Search Results for 'Japan'

Japan Today – Abuse of elderly – a secret sin

http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=comment&id=860

….
This week, a law was passed requiring anyone who discovers abuse to inform local authorities, who then will be required to investigate each case in cooperation with the police. This new law defines abuse as assault that could cause physical injury, verbal abuse, neglecting care and wrongful management of the property of the elderly. The law will become effective in April, 2006.
….
So, just who are these hidden victims and who is mistreating them? There were two studies conducted in 1993 and in 1997 in Japan that produced some of the answers. The victims are mostly over the age of 80 and 70% of them are women. The most common form of abuse was financial and sons most commonly perpetrated it. Somewhere between 33 to 57% of the elders were physically abused and 57% were victims of neglect.

Almost half of the elders were very dependent on their families for assistance. The highest rated cause for this abuse was stress, followed by poor relationships, particularly between older women and their daughters-in-law. A perception of a lack of appreciation for the care being provided and physical fatigue from care giving were additional reasons.

Perhaps, one of the most disturbing aspects of this study was the fact that many of the abusers believed they were entitled to the financial resources of the older person. This may be a result of the pre-World War II inheritance law that gave older people’s inheritance directly to the eldest son.

The types of abuse cited included mental abuse, willful neglect, denying food, physical beatings and tying the old people to their beds. According to a government poll, in over 54% of the cases, the alleged abusers did not recognize that they were abusing their victim, while only 24% stated that they knew what they were doing.

The elderly people often hesitate to call out for help and sometimes even try to conceal the abuse from outsiders. The reasons why they do not flee vary, but in some cases they fear their children will steal their possessions, they blame themselves for having raised such children and they feel it is their duty to stay until they die.

Last April, Japan released its first survey on elderly abuse, finding 1,991 cases. While this appears to be a small number, some experts believe the actual number may be as high as 10,000 and all experts agree that the numbers are increasing.

Elderly abuse is an international problem with Scandinavian countries reporting somewhere between 1 to 8% of the population over the age of 65 years as victims of abuse. In the United States, the percentage ranges between 4 to 10% and in Britain, it is estimated to be around 10%. In fact, in Britain this past February, the BBC launched a television drama, “Dad” in an effort to shed light on this growing problem.
….

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Supercentenarians January 2009

Ms Baines is featured in the LATimes article, Gertrude Baines may be 114, but she’s not counting

http://www.latimes.com/news/local January 11, 2009 Oldest on Earth
1. Gertrude Baines, 114, Los Angeles; born April 6, 1894
2. Beatrice Farve, 113, Georgia; April 30, 1895
3. Kama Chinen, 113, Japan; May 10, 1895
4. Mary Josephine Ray, 113, New Hampshire; May 17, 1895
5. Olivia Patricia Thomas, 113, New York; June 29, 1895
6. Neva Morris, 113, Iowa; Aug. 3, 1895
7. Chiyo Shiraishi, 113, Japan; Aug. 6, 1895
8. Tomoji Tanabe, 113, Japan; Sept. 18, 1895 9. Maggie Renfro, 113, Louisiana; Nov. 14, 1895 10. Yoshino Ide, 113, Japan; Jan. 1, 1896
Source: Inglewood-based Gerontology Research Group


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Search for MIA at Attu

re: the Aleutians War, —

According to Charlie King (see photos), the dead were so numerous that the bulldozers used for the Al-Can were used to push the bodies into mass graves, disturbing to everyone.

revised The story from APRN.org focusses on the search for purposes of cremation and immediate re-burial in situ rather than identification of individuals. Search for Japanese remains on Attu resumes

U.S. and Japan search for WW II Japanese MIAs in Alaska. A team of three Japanese and 11 Americans departed Kodiak this morning aboard a C-130 bound for the U.S. Coast Guard Station on Attu. There, they’ll search burial sites for the bodies of soldiers still missing from a 1943 World War II battle there, according to the Department of Defense.

In June 1942, a unit of the Japanese Army occupied Attu, capturing and imprisoning many of its inhabitants. In May 1943, American forces began to recapture the island in fierce hand-to-hand battles. Casualties were estimated at 540 Americans and 2,300 Japanese.

The Japanese government assisted an American group’s 2007 visit to Iwo Jima in a similar search for missing American MIAs.

***”
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/newsreader/story/404583.html


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Accessible jails

Good news. See previous
Nonagenarian: prison care
A say in one’s or other’s life?

Source: Reuters TOKYO, Jan 4 (Reuters) – Faced with a prison population ageing as rapidly as the rest of the country, Japan is to build new jails with disabled access, including elevators, slopes for wheelchairs and grab-bars in toilets and baths.

The three new penal facilities will offer healthy meals and may also have specialists in nursing and rehabilitation on staff […]

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/T173848.htm


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More on the Aleutians war (WWII)

In the comments to the Special Projects page about the Aleutians War and the building the Al-Can highway, I’ve been tracking the newest documentary about the little known battles of Attu Island and others of the Aleutians, including Dutch Harbor / Unalaska.

However, because comments and pages have separate notifications on the Internet, I thought I would also post a separate notice, especially for those who read this web log with an RSS feed reader.

The latest published film was televised last week on the US Public Broadcasting System, Independent Lens. The film focuses on intimate interviews with Bill and Andy, the film explores what it means to be a soldier then and now. And for Bill, that means continuing the battle—even at the cost of his own peace of mind. and not on the battle details, per se. However, there is fascinating blended footage from the present day terrain morphing into the WWII terrain (actual footage or photos of the battle).

It is also a good presentation of the mixed emotions (and some rather unmixed) of veterans of the Pacific war. I had an uncle in Attu (Claude I. Green) who never spoke much of the Aleutian horror– part of the horror was the transfer from the tropical Marshall Islands to Attu without a change in uniforms (he was in the Navy). The monument is dedicated to all in the campaign (the necessity of which is also controversial still, as is the forced removal and internment of Alaskans by the USA.)

Aleutian Island documentary RED WHITE BLACK and BLUE is going to have a special one-hour broadcast on PBS November 6, and it’s going to be released on home video on November 7. We’re also finishing up some community screenings around the country, mostly in Florida, Michigan, and Indiana.

You can click the link below to read more about the film, get a list of upcoming local screenings, and broadcast information for your area, as well as information about how to purchase the film.

Thanks so much, and if you do get a chance to see the film we’d love to hear your thoughts.

Take care,
Tom Putnam

Here’s their website, http://www.alaskainvasion.com/

The Independent Lens website has a summary, several references to additional information, and a viewer feedback. Read more about the making of RED WHITE BLACK & BLUE »

See also previous
John Huston movie from the Aleutians
Al-Can Highway and the Aleutians War, Alaska in WWII


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