Search Results for 'prison'

Nonagenarian: prison care

following the earlier post, Prisons Not Geared to the Needs of the Elderly, Study Finds

At 95, killer hopes to win freedom

By J. Michael Kennedy, LA Times Staff Writer, June 29, 2007

SAN LUIS OBISPO – John Rodriguez didn’t seem to know what was happening to him.

The state’s oldest inmate didn’t immediately realize that the state parole board had recommended Thursday that he be freed. Instead, the 95-year-old sat hunched in his wheelchair, looking slightly confused, as he had for much of the four-hour hearing at the California Men’s Colony….

The Rodriguez case is unique in that it casts a spotlight on California’s aging prison population and the reluctance of the governor to release prisoners convicted of murder even if they have served their minimum sentences. In Rodriguez’s case, Thursday’s hearing marked the seventh time the state parole board has recommended that he be released….

Meanwhile, Rodriguez is the epitome of the aging prisoner, a man who uses a walker, is hard of hearing and requires a wheelchair when being moved out of the hospital ward where he lives. His normal attire is pajama bottoms and a blue prison shirt…. One recent projection is that by 2030, California will have 33,000 geriatric prisoners, compared with about 9,500 now. […]

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Prisons Not Geared to the Needs of the Elderly, Study Finds

http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000157/story

By 2022, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will incarcerate about thirty thousand elders — individuals who, while they represent the smallest threat to public safety among the prison population, cost the most to imprison, a new report from Legal Services for Prisoners with Children ( http://prisonerswithchildren.org/ ) finds.

Funded by the Los Angeles-based California Endowment, Dignity Denied: the Price of Imprisoning Older Women in California documents the conditions of confinement for the more than three hundred and fifty women over the age of fifty-five in state prisons. According to the report, the “Three Strikes” law and a reluctance to grant parole have left more Californians growing older in prison than ever before. Moreover, health-related expenses push the estimated annual cost of imprisoning an older person to at least $70,000, twice that of a younger prisoner.

The authors of the report further assert that prisons aren’t geared to the needs and vulnerabilities of older people and that their continued incarceration raises fundamental questions of how society treats elders. While many aging prisoners share the same challenges faced by elders in the outside community — bathing, dressing, and using the bathroom — prison policies and everyday routines present unique problems, such as undressing for strip searches, getting assigned to difficult-to-reach top bunks, fighting over limited laundry slots, and waiting in long lines to receive medication. Many older prisoners also report feeling unsafe in their cells and experience difficulties getting help during emergencies.

In an effort to reduce the number of older prisoners, the report recommends the early release of elderly prisoners and supports policy changes to improve prison conditions.

To read or download the complete report (81 pages, PDF), visit: http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000156/report/download

“New Report Calls for Early Release of Elderly Prisoners.” Legal Services for Prisoners With Children Press Release 12/15/05.

http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000157/story

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Notes for the WWII Aleutians Alaska NM project

Thursday, September 02, 2004
Bataan Prisoners’ Returned to SFe’s Bruns Hospital http://tinyurl.com/j3yak

When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II or http://tinyurl.com/l49ay

Book review of Dean Kohlhoff’s When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II. Lydia T. Black, Ph.D. / Reprinted from: Pacific Historical Review v65, n4 (Nov 1996)

This book about the experience of a small group of indigenous Native American inhabitants of the Aleutian Archipelago during and after World War II. One of the villages was Atka — where the Chapel of St. Nicholas was damaged. […]


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Search for MIA at Attu

re: the Aleutians War, —

According to Charlie King (see photos), the dead were so numerous that the bulldozers used for the Al-Can were used to push the bodies into mass graves, disturbing to everyone.

revised The story from APRN.org focusses on the search for purposes of cremation and immediate re-burial in situ rather than identification of individuals. Search for Japanese remains on Attu resumes

U.S. and Japan search for WW II Japanese MIAs in Alaska. A team of three Japanese and 11 Americans departed Kodiak this morning aboard a C-130 bound for the U.S. Coast Guard Station on Attu. There, they’ll search burial sites for the bodies of soldiers still missing from a 1943 World War II battle there, according to the Department of Defense.

In June 1942, a unit of the Japanese Army occupied Attu, capturing and imprisoning many of its inhabitants. In May 1943, American forces began to recapture the island in fierce hand-to-hand battles. Casualties were estimated at 540 Americans and 2,300 Japanese.

The Japanese government assisted an American group’s 2007 visit to Iwo Jima in a similar search for missing American MIAs.

***”
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/newsreader/story/404583.html


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Grants, fellowships– caregivers, planning, poetry

Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program
Supported by The Atlantic Philanthropies and administered by Columbia University, this national program seeks to provide professionals in health and aging with the experience and skills necessary to make a positive contribution to the development and implementation of health policies that affect older Americans. Deadline extended: May 27, 2008. For more information, see http://www.healthandagingpolicy.org/apply/index.html

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Family and Informal Caregiver Support Program
The Weinberg Foundation will help community partnerships develop innovative ways to support these devoted caregivers. Available Funding: Up to $9 million over three years, the Family and Informal Caregiver Support Program will support from 12 to 20 community-based Projects with grants ranging from $100,000 to $300,000 per year. Deadline: Letters of Inquiry: Thursday, June 12, 2008 http://www.epa.gov/aging/grants/grant-list/2008_0612_grant_ofo_1.htm

Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program

The Indian Health Service announces the availability of grants to support planning and implementation of sustainable long-term care services for American Indians and Alaska Native elders. Deadline: June 20, 2008.
http://www.ihs.gov/NonMedicalPrograms/gogp/index.cfm?module=HHS-2008-IHS-LTC-0001


2nd Annual Rachel Carson Intergenerational Poetry, Essay and Photo Contest

The EPA Aging Initiative, in partnership with Generations United and the Rachel Carson Council, Inc., is inviting submissions for its Second Annual Rachel Carson Sense of Wonder Intergenerational Poetry, Essay and Photography Contest. The contest’s intergenerational approach reflects Carson’s desire to have adults and children share a sense of wonder about nature to discover nature’s gifts. Entries must be an intergenerational project. The deadline for entries is Monday, June 16, 2008. For more information see http://www.epa.gov/aging/resources/thesenseofwonder/index.htm

revised 2008-04-19
[from BHIC. See sidebar. Because so many older people are now raising their grandchildren, this program may be of interest.]

Mentoring Children of Prisoners: Caregiver’s Choice Program
Caregiver’s Choice makes it possible for many more kids across the country to have mentors, and for many more families to enjoy all the benefits of mentoring. This program is unique because it gives the child’s caregiver the power to choose—to look at the possibilities and decide on the best mentoring program to meet their needs and the needs of the child. Through Caregiver’s Choice, you can: – Access funding to serve more children; – Tap into federal funds; – Manage your participation level; – Leverage national efforts to recruit children of prisoners; and – Benefit from cutting-edge training and tools. For more information visit, http://www.mentoring.org/find_resources/caregiverschoice/


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