Search Results for 'barrier free'

Accessible jails

Good news. See previous
Nonagenarian: prison care
A say in one’s or other’s life?

Source: Reuters TOKYO, Jan 4 (Reuters) – Faced with a prison population ageing as rapidly as the rest of the country, Japan is to build new jails with disabled access, including elevators, slopes for wheelchairs and grab-bars in toilets and baths.

The three new penal facilities will offer healthy meals and may also have specialists in nursing and rehabilitation on staff […]

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/T173848.htm


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Champion of women’s rights 1910-2006

María Concepción Ortiz y Pino de Kleven, “Concha”, 1910-2006

Champion of women’s rights. Pioneer in bilingual education. Three-term state legislator.“Her mere presence seemed to link the traditions of old Spain to this lost child, the city of Santa Fé.”

María Concepción Ortiz y Pino de Kleven was a legend in the state.

She was a very modern person, he added, “while remaining firmly anchored in the past. She saw herself as the bearer and preserver of the old Spanish culture.”…Concha’s roots in New Mexico go deep. Nine generations of her family lived in the state before her…

Just 17 years after women won the right to vote in 1919, she became New Mexico’s third female legislator, and by far its most influential…. In 1941, barely 30 years old, unmarried and Hispanic, she became Democratic majority whip — the first female in the U.S. to hold such a position in a state government. Her causes included letting women serve on juries, equalizing funding for urban and rural schools, and mandatory Spanish-language instruction for seventh- and eighth-grade students.
“All the legislation I introduced was to change things,” she later reflected….

Five U.S. Presidents — Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford and Carter — appointed her to national boards such as the National Commission on Architectural Barriers, the National Advisory Council to the National Institutes of Health (twice) and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Please read the rest at

and here, http://tinyurl.com/gm55v

Concha Ortiz y Pino with Frank Baca at San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo), circa 1929. See also,


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On-line history making

How to organize photos and text across time and space (collaboration amongst multiple people, known and unknown, the quick, the will be, and those who came before)?

The Al-Can and Aleutians WWII special project has been interesting for finding the limitations of the the existing “cyberspace” and “virtual communities” of “Web 2.0” that are all the buzz. [Running into the barriers came from day one; inadvertent trouble-shooting is a specialty skill of mine.]

While Flickr and blogs (MySpace, LiveJournal, and the new one for the middle-ageing, eons.com), are by definition solipsist and therefore especially useful for exhibitionism and voyeurism; they aren’t yet easy for creating and retrieving information.

from an E_lder-mailer, RE: On 8/15/06, A social networking Web site for Americans aged 50-plus went live on Monday — complete with an online obituary database that sends out alerts when someone you may know dies and that plans to set up a do-it-yourself funeral service.

http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2006/08/15/ new-social-networking-site-for-age-50-plus-americans/


Indeed precisely what I was looking for. The automatic obituary and the self funeral! All these while the new definition of planet assigns 53 to our solar system. School books re-writers will be in demand [i.e., hire the over-50].

There are speciality websites for recording genealogy and family history. The more extensive ones require an annual fee. Many of the data sites are free, such as the Latter Day Saints archive. The web log might be an ideal venue for people to record anecdotes– one can record brief remembrances or notes as they occur; each post is dated; the text can be archived (a little more difficult, currently); and the postings can be collected into a more polished history or biography later. WordPress.com now allows for private posts. However, as I hope becomes clear, the interaction with others is needed.

Family histories can be done without the Internet, of course— The archival quality rag bond notepaper and Noodler’s permanent ink with “copperplate” script writing, recorded in great detail everyday by great great so-and-so, a nosy Parker with nothing better to do and who didn’t mind answering even the “cheeky” hygiene questions of the great great grandrelations to be — is exciting to look at (unless the fourth cousin thrice removed that one has never heard of lost it in a move or for gambling debts).

Life is interactive (see Erving Goffman’s work on social interaction). It is difficult for most people to conceive of what may be interesting of their lives to others. Strangers tell me they want to read about my “interesting life” but from this side it’s just ordinary and gets overlooked (fish in water, etc. I wouldn’t wish to undo an interesting life, but I’m too thoughtful to wish one on anyone else).

    What’s needed is a personal ethnographer or oral historian. Someone to ask questions.

Charlie King’s son points this out very well in a recent E-mail.

Spent virtually the whole morning reading some of the interviews from 341st ? guys. I copied out a bit that described the difficulty of creating the corduroy roads.

Too bad I never recorded any of Dad’s memories of the experience. He wasn’t one to elaborate greatly but could if he was pressed and I’d bet his would have been as detailed and well spoken as this guy who advanced from private to Master Sargent while up there indicating him to have been a uniquely talented guy:

http://www.livinglandscapes.bc.ca/prnr/alaska/wallace.htm

In this one example, you can see some of the strengths of using the Internet, especially the world-wide web and E-mail. But also look at the Dawson project description,

http://www.livinglandscapes.bc.ca/prnr/alaska/history.htm

The project was done with face-to-face (F2F) collaboration and tangible artifacts (photos) and only then assembled for later on-line use. Other projects come in “jukebox” format, CD-ROM or DVD and/or on-line.

Project Jukebox is the digital branch of the Oral History Program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Project Jukebox was originally developed using hypercard in 1988, with initial support from Apple Computer’s Apple Library of Tomorrow program, and is a way to integrate oral history recordings with associated photographs, maps, and text.

http://uaf-db.uaf.edu/Jukebox/PJWeb/pjhome.htm

None of this has solved the problem of linking pictures at Flickr or elsewhere with comments and annotations from others (moderated) and downloadable with metadata intact (unless one has money for a personal website and server). The work-around here doesn’t work — photo index CKing — even if one had highest speed internet, multiple monitors, touch-toe typing, Dragon Naturally Speaking transciption, multi-feed document scanner/fax, a cat that won’t walk the keyboard, ….

Oh, and even with the bestest of tech help 😉


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HomeMods!

Home modification is adaptation to the living environment intended to increase ease of use, safety, security and independence. Some home modifications include:

* Lever door handles that operate easily with a push
* Handrails on both sides of staircase and outside steps
* Ramps for accessible entry and exit
* Walk-in shower
* Grab bars in the shower, by the toilet, and by the tub
* Hand-held, flexible shower head
* Lever-handed faucets that are easy to turn on and off
* Sliding shelves and lazy susan in corner cabinet
* C or D ring handles on cabinet doors and drawers for easy gripping

Home Modification can Promote Independence and Prevent Accidents

* Many persons are living in older structures that are deteriorating to the point that they are hazardous and contribute to the falss and injuries.

* Home modification and repair can help prevent accidents and falls. Research by the National Centers for Disease Control (CDC) suggests that one-third of home accidents can be prevented by modification and repair.

* Modification to the home environment can be a key factor in increasing the likelihood of older persons remaining independent and injury-free in their homes and active in their communities as long as they desire.

* Home modifications can enhance comfort, increase safety, prevent injuries, and facilitate ongoing access to community social, recreational, and supportive activities and services.

* Removing barriers and safety hazards also helps reduce the stresses associated with the reduction in physical capabilities as people age.


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

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