Search Results for 'DVD'

More on the Aleutians war (WWII)

In the comments to the Special Projects page about the Aleutians War and the building the Al-Can highway, I’ve been tracking the newest documentary about the little known battles of Attu Island and others of the Aleutians, including Dutch Harbor / Unalaska.

However, because comments and pages have separate notifications on the Internet, I thought I would also post a separate notice, especially for those who read this web log with an RSS feed reader.

The latest published film was televised last week on the US Public Broadcasting System, Independent Lens. The film focuses on intimate interviews with Bill and Andy, the film explores what it means to be a soldier then and now. And for Bill, that means continuing the battle—even at the cost of his own peace of mind. and not on the battle details, per se. However, there is fascinating blended footage from the present day terrain morphing into the WWII terrain (actual footage or photos of the battle).

It is also a good presentation of the mixed emotions (and some rather unmixed) of veterans of the Pacific war. I had an uncle in Attu (Claude I. Green) who never spoke much of the Aleutian horror– part of the horror was the transfer from the tropical Marshall Islands to Attu without a change in uniforms (he was in the Navy). The monument is dedicated to all in the campaign (the necessity of which is also controversial still, as is the forced removal and internment of Alaskans by the USA.)

Aleutian Island documentary RED WHITE BLACK and BLUE is going to have a special one-hour broadcast on PBS November 6, and it’s going to be released on home video on November 7. We’re also finishing up some community screenings around the country, mostly in Florida, Michigan, and Indiana.

You can click the link below to read more about the film, get a list of upcoming local screenings, and broadcast information for your area, as well as information about how to purchase the film.

Thanks so much, and if you do get a chance to see the film we’d love to hear your thoughts.

Take care,
Tom Putnam

Here’s their website, http://www.alaskainvasion.com/

The Independent Lens website has a summary, several references to additional information, and a viewer feedback. Read more about the making of RED WHITE BLACK & BLUE »

See also previous
John Huston movie from the Aleutians
Al-Can Highway and the Aleutians War, Alaska in WWII


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Pablita Velarde exhibition

Ms Velarde’s work, like Ms Martinez’
https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/09/18/american-indian-linguist/ remained controversial even late into their lives for many people [a sign of living tradition].

David Collins | For The New Mexican, February 19, 2007

A yearlong exhibition that opened Sunday at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture memorializes Santa Clara Pueblo artist Pablita Velarde the way she wanted to be remembered.

“I want the Earth to remember me through my works,” Velarde says in a DVD presentation that offers museum guests a posthumous first-person explanation of her work.

A collection of 58 paintings from the 84 works that Bandelier National Monument officials commissioned Velarde to produce between 1939 and 1945 went on display on Museum Hill. The collection is recognized as a premiere documentation of Pueblo life at that time. …

“It was because of the WPA that many artistic traditions survive today,” museum director Shelby Tisdale said.

Born in 1918 at Santa Clara as Tse Tsan, or “Golden Dawn,” Velarde’s father sent her to St. Catherine Indian School in Santa Fe when she was 5. In the eighth grade, she transferred to Santa Fe Indian School. There, she studied with Dunn, who was renowned for training a generation of American Indians for careers in art.

At the Cerrillos Road school, Velarde’s art developed in a direction that defied tradition, even as she documented and interpreted the traditions she learned from elders. …

Velarde’s work for Bandelier includes traditional motifs but relies on illustration styles and materials typical of the era. Later in her life, Velarde experimented with natural media until she perfected her own rendition of media used in ancient petroglyphs. Velarde called them earth pigments.

By her own account, Velarde battled a stigma as a woman working in a medium traditionally reserved for men until 1953, when she became the first woman to receive the prestigious Grand Purchase Award from the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Okla.

Tisdale said the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture started negotiating an exhibit of Velarde’s work for the Bandelier monument a few months before her death Jan. 10, 2006, at age 87.


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Tolstoy’s bicyclists

more nonagenarians and centenarians

Too old to scuba dive at 80? Don’t believe it. We talk to eight intrepid people who prove it’s never too late to learn something new, whether it’s dancing, making a keep-fit video – or skydiving

Friday January 12, 2007, The Guardian

The journalist: Rose Hacker, 100

Last year, at the age of 100 and after being a politician, writer, artist, sex therapist and peace activist, Hacker became a journalist. She was at the anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima in Tavistock Square in London when a local newspaper reporter saw her give a speech and suggested she write a regular column. Called “She’s 100 so she should know a thing or two”, it runs in the Camden New Journal, a north London newspaper, every fortnight. She has written about issues including homelessness, the wealth gap, the divisiveness of religious education, greed and property ownership. “I’ve got so much I have to say. I look at my great-granddaughter who is three years old and think, what sort of world has she been brought into? I just can’t bear it.”

Every couple of weeks, a reporter comes to her room at the retirement home in north London where she lives and types away at a laptop while Hacker talks, surrounded by books on politics and art and photographs of her family. “Then he shows me on the screen in a big font so I can read it,” she says. “It’s very exciting. I can do anything – they don’t tell me what to write.

“It has given me a new lease of life. I was dying. I had my 100th birthday and everybody gave me parties; I had a wonderful time. Then I collapsed. I was unconscious; I had everything wrong with me. Now, in my second century, I’m like a baby, I’ve started all over again. I had to learn to walk again, come out of nappies.”

It’s not often that you meet 100-year-olds, but it seems unlikely that many are as lively as Hacker. She is partially deaf and blind but she walks unaided and her mind is crammed with information. She is funny, too. She’s wearing glamorous, big silver earrings that dangle furiously when she leans forward in her chair to make a point – and she has an opinion on everything.

Hacker was born in east London to Jewish parents. Her father, an immigrant from Poland, ran a tailoring business and Hacker became one of his clothes designers. Having always been interested in politics, she joined the Labour party and got married – to Mark, an accountant (he died in 1982, after 52 years of marriage). She gave up being a designer when she had children – two sons – but later joined the Marriage Guidance Council and became one of Britain’s first sex therapists. She wrote several books, including one about sex for teenagers. “Nobody talked about sex in those days,” she says. “These days, it’s all everyone seems to talk about”.

“It would be so easy for me to sit in this chair, listen to music and do nothing,” she says. “I can understand people my age who just give up.” So why doesn’t she? “Because of the state of the world. I think it’s very important that people should listen to people like me – and we’re being totally ignored.” Does that make her angry? “Yes. But I’m furious about everything.” Not least what Hacker, a lifelong socialist, sees as the betrayal by New Labour. “I wrote to Blair and said if you go to war in Iraq, after 80 years of hard work I will resign. The same day I got a certificate that makes me an honorary lifetime member of Highgate Labour party, so I’m not sure I can.” Did she ever think the future would be this bad? “No, I thought we would have a wonderful future. We’d built a welfare state and it worked. We had a health service. We built schools. But the monsters have taken over the world.”
Emine Saner

The keep-fit fanatic: Seona Ross, 90

Ross is 90 and has just made her first exercise video. “I enjoyed it thoroughly,” she says. “It was fun, a real challenge. I had three members of the exercise class I run working with me to show that older people can do it. I had thought about doing a video before when I was younger but never did, so when Help the Aged asked me, I agreed without even thinking about it. I hadn’t seen any [other videos] I thought were suitable for older people.” For the elderly, exercise is, she says, “absolutely essential. The main thing about the work I do with senior citizens is it is keeping them in their own homes. I’m saving the NHS and the government a hell of a lot of money. I’ve had people come to me who decide they don’t need to take all the pills they had been taking – they’re not going into care homes.”

The video and DVD, Step to the Future, contains 40 minutes of exercises for older people. “Exercise is vital in having the right attitude to life. All those endorphins are good for you. The video shows that older people can exercise and enjoy it, but we focus a lot on how to do it safely.” In her classes, Ross, a music fan, relies on good tunes to keep her members moving. What did she choose for her video? “The music was dead boring, to be honest,” she says and laughs. So what does she choose for her class? “All sorts, but very little of your modern music – as far as I’m concerned, that’s not music at all. All that repetitiveness.” She makes an exasperated noise. Ross likes Latin American music and old showtunes.

Ross, who has three children, six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren and lives in Wiltshire, decided she wanted to become an exercise instructor when she was 14 and saw a demonstration by the Women’s League of Health and Beauty in Glasgow, the institution founded by Mary Bagot Stack to introduce exercise to all women. “My parents thought I was mad and said I had to finish school.”

Just before she turned 17, she moved to London and attended Stack’s school to train instructors at a time when women were expected to be able to dance, but not do these strange stretches and jump around in shorts and vests. “We were pioneers,” says Ross. “We would do demonstrations in Hyde Park and great crowds would come. They must have thought we were mad but we were treated like pop stars.”

Now, in her 10th decade, she says it is exercise that has kept her young. “I still go out and enjoy myself and see my friends. I’m just as fit and frisky as I was when I was 70.” Step to the Future is available on DVD and video (£12) from http://www.helptheaged.org.uk/homeshopping or 0870 770 0441
Emine Saner

“The student: Bernard Herzberg, 98

Herzberg was 81 when he did his first degree, and is now just months away from getting his MA in African economics and literature at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) in London. His final paper, an essay on the inevitability of military rule in Africa after decolonisation, was handed in four months ahead of the deadline.

“This is the second time I have written this essay,” says Herzberg, who lives in East Finchley. “The first time the lecturer did not agree with the way I wrote it, so I had to redo it.” This time the 98-year-old is confident that he will pass. But whether he does or not hardly seems to matter: his wife died last month, and studying is now a way for him to keep himself occupied. “I didn’t want to sit at home doing nothing, especially now that I am alone,” he says.

At Soas he has made many friends among his fellow students and lecturers, all of whom are a lot younger than him. “Do they treat me well? Oh, yes, very much so.”

As a Jew growing up in 1930s Germany, Herzberg was denied the chance of a university education. In his early 20s he emigrated to South Africa, where he lived for half a century before moving to London in 1985. Married with two children, he didn’t get round to university until after he had retired from the chemical industry in his early 80s. But this latest MA will join a long list of educational achievements, including another MA in refugee studies gained in 2005, and a degree in German and German literature before that.

Whatever the outcome in May, Herzberg is satisfied with his accomplishments. “Whether I get the third degree or not is immaterial,” he said. “I have lived a good life.”
Mildred Amadiegwu”


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name not a number pedal cycle“Name not a number”

On-line history making

How to organize photos and text across time and space (collaboration amongst multiple people, known and unknown, the quick, the will be, and those who came before)?

The Al-Can and Aleutians WWII special project has been interesting for finding the limitations of the the existing “cyberspace” and “virtual communities” of “Web 2.0” that are all the buzz. [Running into the barriers came from day one; inadvertent trouble-shooting is a specialty skill of mine.]

While Flickr and blogs (MySpace, LiveJournal, and the new one for the middle-ageing, eons.com), are by definition solipsist and therefore especially useful for exhibitionism and voyeurism; they aren’t yet easy for creating and retrieving information.

from an E_lder-mailer, RE: On 8/15/06, A social networking Web site for Americans aged 50-plus went live on Monday — complete with an online obituary database that sends out alerts when someone you may know dies and that plans to set up a do-it-yourself funeral service.

http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2006/08/15/ new-social-networking-site-for-age-50-plus-americans/


Indeed precisely what I was looking for. The automatic obituary and the self funeral! All these while the new definition of planet assigns 53 to our solar system. School books re-writers will be in demand [i.e., hire the over-50].

There are speciality websites for recording genealogy and family history. The more extensive ones require an annual fee. Many of the data sites are free, such as the Latter Day Saints archive. The web log might be an ideal venue for people to record anecdotes– one can record brief remembrances or notes as they occur; each post is dated; the text can be archived (a little more difficult, currently); and the postings can be collected into a more polished history or biography later. WordPress.com now allows for private posts. However, as I hope becomes clear, the interaction with others is needed.

Family histories can be done without the Internet, of course— The archival quality rag bond notepaper and Noodler’s permanent ink with “copperplate” script writing, recorded in great detail everyday by great great so-and-so, a nosy Parker with nothing better to do and who didn’t mind answering even the “cheeky” hygiene questions of the great great grandrelations to be — is exciting to look at (unless the fourth cousin thrice removed that one has never heard of lost it in a move or for gambling debts).

Life is interactive (see Erving Goffman’s work on social interaction). It is difficult for most people to conceive of what may be interesting of their lives to others. Strangers tell me they want to read about my “interesting life” but from this side it’s just ordinary and gets overlooked (fish in water, etc. I wouldn’t wish to undo an interesting life, but I’m too thoughtful to wish one on anyone else).

    What’s needed is a personal ethnographer or oral historian. Someone to ask questions.

Charlie King’s son points this out very well in a recent E-mail.

Spent virtually the whole morning reading some of the interviews from 341st ? guys. I copied out a bit that described the difficulty of creating the corduroy roads.

Too bad I never recorded any of Dad’s memories of the experience. He wasn’t one to elaborate greatly but could if he was pressed and I’d bet his would have been as detailed and well spoken as this guy who advanced from private to Master Sargent while up there indicating him to have been a uniquely talented guy:

http://www.livinglandscapes.bc.ca/prnr/alaska/wallace.htm

In this one example, you can see some of the strengths of using the Internet, especially the world-wide web and E-mail. But also look at the Dawson project description,

http://www.livinglandscapes.bc.ca/prnr/alaska/history.htm

The project was done with face-to-face (F2F) collaboration and tangible artifacts (photos) and only then assembled for later on-line use. Other projects come in “jukebox” format, CD-ROM or DVD and/or on-line.

Project Jukebox is the digital branch of the Oral History Program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Project Jukebox was originally developed using hypercard in 1988, with initial support from Apple Computer’s Apple Library of Tomorrow program, and is a way to integrate oral history recordings with associated photographs, maps, and text.

http://uaf-db.uaf.edu/Jukebox/PJWeb/pjhome.htm

None of this has solved the problem of linking pictures at Flickr or elsewhere with comments and annotations from others (moderated) and downloadable with metadata intact (unless one has money for a personal website and server). The work-around here doesn’t work — photo index CKing — even if one had highest speed internet, multiple monitors, touch-toe typing, Dragon Naturally Speaking transciption, multi-feed document scanner/fax, a cat that won’t walk the keyboard, ….

Oh, and even with the bestest of tech help 😉


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Almost Home-Broadcast Premiere

http://itvs.org/shows/broadcast.htm?showID-1055

from Fwd: [aging_initiativ] January 2006 US EPA Aging List Serve -Feb. 21, 2006 at 10 pm ET on PBS

Shot on location in a nursing home, Almost Home tells real stories of aging: couples bonded and divided by disability, children torn between caring for their aging parents and their own families, attendants doing unsavory work for poverty wages and a visionary nursing home director committed to changes that could shuck the nursing home stigma. Almost Home is scheduled for Tues., Feb. 21, 2006 at 10 pm ET on PBS’ Independent Lens Series (check local listings at http://itvs.org/shows/broadcast.htm?showID-1055). DVDs of Almost Home and clips from the program may be obtained free of charge for educators and others in the aging field, while supplies last, by contacting Lauren Burke, laburkeATuwmDOTedu.

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