Search Results for 'documentary'

More on the Aleutians war (WWII)

In the comments to the Special Projects page about the Aleutians War and the building the Al-Can highway, I’ve been tracking the newest documentary about the little known battles of Attu Island and others of the Aleutians, including Dutch Harbor / Unalaska.

However, because comments and pages have separate notifications on the Internet, I thought I would also post a separate notice, especially for those who read this web log with an RSS feed reader.

The latest published film was televised last week on the US Public Broadcasting System, Independent Lens. The film focuses on intimate interviews with Bill and Andy, the film explores what it means to be a soldier then and now. And for Bill, that means continuing the battle—even at the cost of his own peace of mind. and not on the battle details, per se. However, there is fascinating blended footage from the present day terrain morphing into the WWII terrain (actual footage or photos of the battle).

It is also a good presentation of the mixed emotions (and some rather unmixed) of veterans of the Pacific war. I had an uncle in Attu (Claude I. Green) who never spoke much of the Aleutian horror– part of the horror was the transfer from the tropical Marshall Islands to Attu without a change in uniforms (he was in the Navy). The monument is dedicated to all in the campaign (the necessity of which is also controversial still, as is the forced removal and internment of Alaskans by the USA.)

Aleutian Island documentary RED WHITE BLACK and BLUE is going to have a special one-hour broadcast on PBS November 6, and it’s going to be released on home video on November 7. We’re also finishing up some community screenings around the country, mostly in Florida, Michigan, and Indiana.

You can click the link below to read more about the film, get a list of upcoming local screenings, and broadcast information for your area, as well as information about how to purchase the film.

Thanks so much, and if you do get a chance to see the film we’d love to hear your thoughts.

Take care,
Tom Putnam

Here’s their website, http://www.alaskainvasion.com/

The Independent Lens website has a summary, several references to additional information, and a viewer feedback. Read more about the making of RED WHITE BLACK & BLUE »

See also previous
John Huston movie from the Aleutians
Al-Can Highway and the Aleutians War, Alaska in WWII


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Nonagenarian archaeologist Kathleen Gilmore

2011-08-17 Dr Gilmore’s death was npt widely known, unfortunately, in the news media. She would have been someone to have known. Kathleen Kirk Gilmore | Visit Guest Book Gilmore, Kathleen Kirk Kathleen Kirk Gilmore, born Nov. 12, 1914, in Altus, OK. Passed away March 18, 2010. She was the daughter of Jessie Horton Kirk and Rufus Patrick Kirk and wife of late Robert Beattie Gilmore. She worked since Junior High at various jobs while going to school to earn her BS in Geology from Oklahoma University. After raising 4 daughters, she returned to school earning her PhD in anthropology in 1973 from SMU and she has been working as an archaeologist since. She was an adjunct professor at North Texas University from 1974 to 1990 and led many archaeology digs in Texas and elsewhere. Past contributions in her field include the first female President of the Society for Historical Archaeology, President of the Texas Archaeological Society, President of the Council of Texas Archaeologists, served on the Texas Board of Review, Board of Directors of the Texas Historical Foundation. In 1995 she was the first woman to receive the Harrington Medal in Historical Archaeology and in 2008 she received the Governor’s Award for Historical Preservation. She was the first archaeologist to prove the location of La Salle’s Fort St. Lewis settlement. Survived by daughters Judy Gilmore Lepthien, Pat Gilmore, 5 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchild-ren. Donations can be made to Texas Historical Commission, Texas Archeological Society, or the Society for Historical Preservation. Services will be held at Sparkman/Hillcrest Funeral Home at 4 pm on Tuesday March 23, 2010 and following the services will be a celebration of her life at the house.

Archaeologist Kathleen Gilmore has unlocked some of the most elusive mysteries of Texas history.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/stories/082807dnmetarc.3157d1e.html
By ALLEN HOUSTON, The Dallas Morning News, 05:01 AM CDT on Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Kathleen Gilmore by JIM MAHONEY/DMN

VICTORIA, Texas –
Kathleen Gilmore, the first archaeologist to prove the location of explorer La Salle’s Fort St. Louis, returned to the site near Victoria, Texas, earlier this year with a French documentary film crew.

She spent decades hunting down the location of the French explorer La Salle’s lost fort before discovering it near the Gulf Coast. She also excavated a number of Spanish colonial forts in Texas, including Mission Rosario, near Goliad.

At age 92, the Preston Hollow resident will visit Spain in December to study a recently discovered cache of documents sent from early Texas missions.

But her greatest accomplishment may have been digging the way for other women to follow in her footsteps….

[Now, why would she need to dig her/our way forward? for example,

Jeff Durst, an archaeologist with the Texas Historical Commission, added: “She’s got an incredible amount of spirit and spunk for her age.

Time’s passage hasn’t slowed Dr. Gilmore.]

Dr. Gilmore grew up in Tulsa and in the 1930s attended the University of Oklahoma, where she studied geology, believing that it would be easier to help support her family during the Depression.

Instead, the only work she could find was as a secretary for a geologist in Houston.

“That’s the way it was at the time, and me and a lot of women were forced to accept that,” she said.

In the early 1940s, Dr. Gilmore married her husband, Bob, and moved to Dallas, where they had four children. She didn’t go back to school until she was 49, enrolling in the archaeology program at Southern Methodist University.

… Dr. Gilmore became the first female president of the Society for Historical Archaeology and was an adjunct professor at the University of North Texas for 15 years. She also was the first archaeologist to prove the location of La Salle’s Fort St. Louis, according to the Texas Historical Commission….

Fort St. Louis lasted from 1685 to 1689 before its last inhabitants were killed by Indians, according to the Texas Historical Commission. By the camp’s end, La Salle had been murdered by some of his men while trying to make his way to French settlements in Canada.

Dr. Gilmore’s search for the fort began in the early 1970s when she helped analyze some ceramic fragments found in a field near Victoria. The shards turned out to be from the Saintonge area of France…. “One of the great what-ifs of Texas history is, ‘What would our state be like today if the French had been successful with their colony?’ ” Dr. Bruseth said, laughing….


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Nonagenarian long-lived arts figures

List of 10 long-lived arts figures

The article has good reviews of two of Bergman and Antonioni films.

After Ingmar Bergman and Michelangelo Antonioni died on the same day, those shocked by their passing were outnumbered only, perhaps, by those shocked that Antonioni had still been alive, at age 94. Here is our list of 10 quietly long-lived arts figures who are still with us:

Sid Caesar, 85. Pray for a screen comeback for the TV legend so his final credit won’t be as “Old Army Buddy” in Comic Book: The Movie.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, 88. The oldest living Nobel laureate for literature, the author of Cancer Ward returned to Russia in 1994 after his exile, and now writes speeches and pamphlets in which he rails against East and West alike.
Arthur C. Clarke, 89. How great a sci-fi writer is the creator of 2001: A Space Odyssey and Childhood’s End? So great, he has actually found the secret for travelling into the future: take care of yourself and just wait.
Vera Lynn, 90. The British songbird whose songs like “The White Cliffs of Dover” kept morale high in World War II has outlasted the Nazi threat by 62 years. The optimism of her wartime hit “We’ll Meet Again” was made to seem outdated at the climax of Dr. Strangelove, but then again she has outlived all of that movie’s principals. Who’s old hat now, Stanley Kubrick?
Olivia de Havilland, 91. Hollywood’s full of humiliations for older actresses. For example, de Havilland’s onscreen paramour Dick Powell (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 1935) has been dead for 44 years.
Les Paul, 92. Never mind mere survival: The man who pioneered the solid-body electric guitar – without whom rock `n’ roll couldn’t have existed – is still playing every Monday at New York’s Iridium Club.
Budd Schulberg, 93. He helped write A Star Is Born – the original 1937 version, starring Janet Gaynor – and also won an Oscar for writing On the Waterfront. So you kids stay off his lawn.
Pinetop Perkins, 94. Three years ago, this piano bluesman became the oldest person ever nominated for a Grammy. He still gigs weekly, like Les Paul, at the Broken Spoke in Austin, Tex.
Studs Terkel, 94. The famed broadcaster and documentarist of the U.S. working class recently said, “The older you are, the freer you are, as long as you last.” The productive Terkel seems to believe it; he’s got a memoir coming out in November. (J.D. Salinger, seven years younger, hasn’t published anything new for 42 years.)
Albert Hofman, 101. Not strictly an artist, but this European scientist’s creation of LSD in 1938 made acid rock, Robert Crumb and other ’60s innovations possible. Here’s a one-hour NFB documentary on him: tinyurl.com/yr44r7
-Garnet Fraser

But, there are others, too, such as Jack LaLanne and Wow!!! Lena Horne

Born Sept. 26, 1914, Jack LaLanne says he started life “as a weak, sick, miserable kid,” who was addicted to sugar. He learned about exercising and eating healthy when he was 15 and began his fitness crusade. At age 35, he was a living example of the positive effects of exercising and eating right.”

Trained as a chiropractor, LaLanne began advocating weight training in the 1930s even though doctors at the time thought the new practice would give people heart attacks and lower their sex drives. Science has since proved LeLanne was right…

LaLanne took his ideas on health and fitness to the national airways with the Jack LaLanne Show, which ran from 1951-1985. The show earned LaLanne a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. […]

http://www.wpostflash.com/wp-srv/photo/gallery/070608/GAL-07Jun08-77378/captions/PHO-07Jun08-77383.html

Jack LaLanneJack LaLanne — who’s planning a long swim for his 95th birthday — demonstrates how to keep in shape in the gym of a Washington hotel. (Photos By Carol Guzy — The Washington Post)

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Nonagenarian painter still fights for Minamata patients

Painter, 91, still fights for Minamata patients
07/20/2007, BY AYAKO TSUKIDATE, THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Kikue Wakatsuki, moved by the plight of the mercury-poisoning victims, decided to bill her customers specifically for “fund-raising,” saying their “donations” would be sent to help the patients in Minamata, Kumamoto Prefecture. No one complained.

Wakatsuki retired from the bar called Noa Noa long ago. She is now 91 years old and uses a wheelchair. But she continues to help Minamata disease victims.

Last month, Wakatsuki, who is also a painter, held her first private art exhibition in her hometown of Niigata, bringing her together with mercury-poisoning victims in the city for the first time….

Kikue Wakatsuki, 91, at her art exhibition in Niigata, greets former patrons of her bar in Tokyo’s Shinjuku district. (AYAKO TSUKIDATE/ THE ASAHI SHIMBUN)

Sanji Watanabe, 91, a Japanese folk singer who is also a victim of industrial mercury poisoning, sang in front of Wakatsuki.

Many of Wakatsuki’s fans, including former patrons of her bar in Shinjuku, showed up and danced to the music….

Minamata disease is a neurological syndrome first discovered in 1956. It is caused by consumption of marine products tainted with methyl mercury discharged from a Chisso Corp. plant into Minamata Bay. Although certified Minamata disease patients are entitled to payments for medical treatment, the standards for certification are rigid, and many sufferers have been left out.

Hideto Hatano… is also a key figure in managing the Niigata Eya art gallery, and he said he remembered hearing about Noa Noa’s manager who continued to support Minamata disease victims. When Hatano learned that Watatsuki had never held a private showing in her hometown, he invited her–and her paintings–to Niigata. […]

See also
A Case Study of a Documentary Portrait (the article discusses the impact of the Eugene Smith photo on the family under a discussion of ethics in photography)

Editor’s Note: If you wish to view the photograph discussed in this article, it is still viewable online at www.masters-of-photography.com. Click on Smith, then click through the slides to the last one, which is “Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath.”

Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thursday, Sept. 12, 2004 THE ASIAN BOOKSHELF MINAMATA DISEASE Exploring a cautionary tale By STEPHEN HESSE

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Comments on Al-Can and Aleutians photos

I think this may be a way for people to more easily add their knowledge about the Aleutians War and building the Alaska-Canada Highway. Easier than what was originally posted on the Special Projects page Al-Can Highway and the Aleutians War, Alaska in WWII

The photos are hosted at Flickr, but only those with an account can comment there. Fortunately, a “newsreader” such as http://www.curiostudio.com/ Great News feed reader, can collect the comments on Flickr, along with the tiny images to which the comments are attached. This means anyone can comment here, but one can see the full-size photos there. I would advise you to open the links (click on the thumbnail pictures below) to the pictures on Flickr in a separate tab or window. In some cases, tech support has re-arranged the original comment or changed the titles, but the photos should still be there.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
revised 2007-10-10
There is another way to view the photos as a set (but not the comments as posted below). Flickrleech.net provides a really nice way to view Flickr photos (please support his bandwidth). Any small picture can then be clicked on to view the actual Flickr hosted image and comments. Here’s the link

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Comment about Shemya Attu Agattu NGeo

Gruscana has posted a comment:

“National Geographic map, can be purchased. Attu and Shemya can be viewed in “more views”, all the way to the west in the margin”
theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/07/12/charlie-king-builds…

Shemya Attu Agattu NGeo

8/27/2006 07:23 PM


Comment about River camp

csking has posted a comment:

The exposed barren slope on the right may be the same slope shown in the later photo titled “blasting.” If so, that picture may be incorrectly noted as having possibly been at the 1,040-foot Slim’s River crossing. On the other hand, this could be the same crossing which from this distant perspective makes the width of the river seem less than a thousand feet. Quien sabe?

River camp

8/27/2006 10:24 AM


Comment about Scan7281

csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

Scan7281

8/24/2006 05:31 PM


Comment about plank bridge, finished
csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects. This appears to be at the time of “draggin’ up” and on to the next camp.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

plank bridge, finished

8/24/2006 05:27 PM


Comment about Plank bridge, side view
csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects. This would appear to have been taken upon completion.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

Plank bridge, side view

8/24/2006 05:23 PM


Comment about plank bridge
csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

plank bridge

8/24/2006 05:05 PM


Comment about blasting, csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

blasting

8/24/2006 05:04 PM |


Comment about major river crossing

csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

major river crossing

8/24/2006 04:59 PM |


Comment about major river crossing

csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

major river crossing

8/24/2006 04:58 PM


Comment about major river crossing, blasting

csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

major river crossing, blasting

8/24/2006 04:57 PM


Comment about major river crossing, staging

csking has posted a comment:

One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

major river crossing, staging

8/24/2006 04:56 PM


Comment about Plane crash 1-a

csking has posted a comment:

From other reading I’ve done on how the route was determined, a lot of the flying was done by a guy personally contracted by the General in charge who flew along…one General Hoge (sp?) till he went on to notable successes in Europe after having been replaced. This pilot is described in the most stellar terms by the general. I didn’t read the whole narrative but I didn’t see any reference to his plane ever having crashed.

Plane crash 1-a

8/24/2006 04:46 PM


Comment about Plank bridge

csking has posted a comment:

Gruscana has added several more to the original two. I sent when I realized that they were almost certainly of the same project and would provide an interesting progression from the picture showing where they had decided to cross and the final convoy crossing the bridge and on to the next camp and project.

I can’t help but wonder what was next and remember the picture of the North River project (many miles and bridges later) in another picture that was done in the dead of winter. In line with that I remember the first time I heard Dad convey the universal sentiment contained in the saying, “things can always get worse.” I think his actual words were, “Things are never as bad as they seem,” as he tried to assuage some silly childhood concern.

Plank bridge

8/24/2006 11:15 AM


Comment about Plank bridge

csking has posted a comment:

Some of the pictures in this sequence, and out of sequence, could be of the construction of the 1,040 foot Slim’s River Bridge mentioned on page 12 of “Building the Road to Alaska.” Quoting from the document, “Few obstacles slowed construction except the major water courses, such as Slim’s River which required the 18th Engineers to build a 1,040-foot pile stringer bridge and the 340th’s bridge over the Rancheria River.”

Plank bridge

8/24/2006 11:09 AM


Comment about Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

csking has posted a comment:

Picture #10 labeled “Canyon Creek Bridge” at another Internet site is apparently the same bridge.

Pictures are a subset of this site and accessible by clicking on the “Pictures” button:

www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/9977/

Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

8/24/2006 10:46 AM


Comment about equipment, road grader

csking has posted a comment:

All the other pictures of abandoned equipment and ordinance are also interesting.

equipment, road grader

8/24/2006 07:16 AM


Comment about Bridges

csking has posted a comment:

Subsequent to my note above I found an authoritative reference to the number of bridges the 18th Engineers constructed in a U.S. Army historical called, “Building the Road to Alaska.” Page 128 of that document (page 12 of 19 by the Acrobat Reader page counter) states the following:

“The effort expended on bridges and culverts was significant — in the 95 miles fom the Aishihik River to Kluane Lake, the 18th Engineers built 225 stringer bridges, an A-frame at Aishihik, 2 pile stringer bridges, and 138 timber box culverts.” Quote is from the follwing (pdf file):

www.usace.army.mil/publications/eng-pamphlets/ep870-1-42/…

This, of course, is only the number of bridges and culverts constructed over that stretch of the highway.

Bridges

8/23/2006 06:54 AM


Comment about equipment, road grader

Gruscana has posted a comment:

There’s a picture of one of these, 60 years later on the Aleutians, Attu040601-024.jpg

equipment, road grader

8/21/2006 11:58 PM


Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

Gruscana has posted a comment:

There’s a photo of the Marston matting used for the airstrips (importance discussed in thesis), here
static.flickr.com/33/48492349_59c8572ed3.jpg?v=0
from the entire set of contemporary photos of Aleutians war sites.
WWII in the Aleutians (Set)

The Williwaw Wail page 5

8/21/2006 11:42 PM


Comment about Joe Longo

csking has posted a comment:

This barracks photo of another GI cleaining his M1 Garand was probably taken near the end of the war at Ft. Belvoir, VA after 18th Engineers returned to the states from Alaska and The Aleutians.

Notice what appears to be a shiney steel butt plate on the rifle which could indicate an upcoming parade review…possibly the last one.

Joe Longo

8/21/2006 08:49 AM


Comment about Pack Train Inn, Skagway

csking has posted a comment:

“Skagway is … considered the northern most point in Southeast Alaska, 80 air miles from Juneau and 110 road miles from Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada.”

From a history of Skagway as found on the Internet:

“1942 – Skagway is literally invaded by U.S. Army troops, who take over the railroad for a major supply route to build the Alcan Highway. The tracks are moved off Broadway and as many as 20 trains a day climb the pass. Over the next three years as many as 3,000 troops are stationed here. Vacant lots sprout rounded Quonset huts and H buildings. A pipeline is constructed along railway for fuel shipments.”

Pack Train Inn, Skagway

8/21/2006 08:38 AM


Comment about 60 below

csking has posted a comment:

Based on other photographs with notations, the guy on left appears to be William (Bob) E. Porter from Yazoo City, Mississippi and the other Stanwood A. Murphy from San Francisco.

Dad spoke a few times of the danger associated with even the most brief exposure of bare flesh to these temperatures. For my Brother and me the most frightening and memorable was his description of the dangers associated with going to the latrine.

A historical narrative I’ve seen recently stated that there was a low temperature recorded somewhere along the Al-Can during its construction of seventy below zero.

60 below

8/21/2006 07:11 AM


Comment about G McCalla, YT

csking has posted a comment:

G. McCalla, Yukon Territory, somewhere along the AlCan Highway during W.W. II. Photo taken my Father, Charles King.

I’ve gone back and looked in Dad’s photo album and found this man’s bold signature on the first page of three containing twenty-seven signatures and hometowns (some addresses and prepended four-digit phone numbers also…i.e., Mayfair 9139 for one Harry R. Nagel) of friends. The “G” is for George and his hometown is stated as “Phila – Penna.”

Interestingly, every signature is legible and in keeping with the standard handwriting techniques taught in school at that time…and probably to this day for that matter. I’d bet that sixty years later any such list of twenty-seven different signatures of men of this age group (in or out of the service and of any demographic) might reveal the actual names of fifteen to twenty.

G McCalla, YT

8/21/2006 06:12 AM


Comment about Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

csking has posted a comment:

First of two pictures of the same bridge. Note the log cabins in the background of this one.

Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

8/21/2006 05:15 AM


Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

Gruscana has posted a comment:

Williwaw. Williwaw is the [NOT] Aleut word for the violent, hurricane force winds in the region which can exceed 100 miles per hour.”

Weather as the Decisive Factor of the Aleutian Campaign, June 1942 – August 1943
A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE, 1993
CAROL A. WILDER, LCDR, USN
tinyurl.com/zmbs4

Not an Aleut word, according to Dr Lydia Black who knows.

The Williwaw Wail page 5

8/20/2006 09:33 PM


Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

csking has posted a comment:

The following is a short contextual definition of WILLIWAW as taken from what I believe is a U.S. Army historical narrative of the a landing on the Aleutian Island of Amchitka:

“Just surviving the weather on Amchitka was a challenge. During the first night ashore, a “willowaw” (a violent squall) smashed many of the landing boats and swept a troop transport aground.”

Internet address for the whole well written pictorial narrative entitled “Aleutians – The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II is as follows:

Aleutians – The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II

The Williwaw Wail page 5

8/20/2006 09:55 AM


Comment about Shemya2 (back)

csking has posted a comment:

Back side of the next photograph in series. I’ve recently seen a photograph posted by the son of another AlCan vet at another site that shows the hooch looking little ramshackle place that was the Shemya photo shop where this was no doubt developed and stamped.

photo and script by Tec V, Charles King, 18th Combat Engineers

Shemya2 (back)

8/19/2006 11:15 AM


Comment about White River, YT winter

csking has posted a comment:

I don’t know how wide or deep The White River is but it seems to me it would be difficult to overstate the difficulty of constructing almost any size bridge in what appears to be the dead of a Yukon winter.

Photo and script by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Combat Engineers, AlCan Highway, W.W. II.

White River, YT winter

8/19/2006 11:05 AM


Comment about Handling logs for bridge

csking has posted a comment:

To the extent I ever wondered why Dad knew so much about this kind of equipment (winches, gin-pole trucks, cranes, etc.), these pictures answer the question.

Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, AlCan Highway construction, W.W. II

Handling logs for bridge

8/19/2006 10:54 AM


Comment about River camp

csking has posted a comment:

Judging from what appears to vehicles or an encampment on the other side of the river, this is no doubt a view of the point at which a bridge was to be constructed.

Photo by Tec V, Charles King, AlCan Highway construction, W.W. II.

River camp

8/19/2006 10:43 AM


Comment about Scan754

csking has posted a comment:

Picture one of two in a series — herewith showing the bridge under construction and then finished (or at least passable to vehicular traffic) in the second picture (next in this series…as it is now).

Photo by Tec V Charlie King, Alcan Highway construcion, W.W. II

Scan754

8/19/2006 10:37 AM


Comment about Scan7161

csking has posted a comment:

Not visible in this picture is what is likely chains connecting this series of vehicles together as they’re being pulled through the muck by the Caterpillar D-9 up front. I’ve zoomed in on this picture to see if the driver of the cat is my Dad, Charlie King. It’s indeterminable but it probably is with the photo taken by a friend in the truck…somewhere on AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

Scan7161

8/19/2006 10:29 AM


Comment about Scan7321

csking has posted a comment:

From a recently read a transcription of an interview of Brigadier General William M. Hoge (one of the Commanding Generals of the Alaska Highway project), he states that their original road cutting methodology that called for a 100 foot wide clearing through the forests for the roadway was too wide because it let too much sunlight in which allowed the muskeg or permafrost to melt. The problem wasn’t immediately apparent and discovered only after the road was found to be impassable on a return trip days or weeks later. Even after the road clearing width had been reduced to twenty-five feet they still had to lay the cleared trees down in a corduroy fashion in some places.

The Hoge interview address is: (pdf file)
www.usace.army.mil/publications/eng-pamphlets/ep870-1-25/…

Scan7321

8/19/2006 10:19 AM


Comment about Shemya3

csking has posted a comment:

Dad spoke of Agatu also but I think only as an island he saw from a distance.

Shemya3

8/14/2006 09:29 AM


Comment about Shemya2 1944

csking has posted a comment:

Backside noted by Tec V Charlie King:

Shemya, Aleutian Island, 1944
8/14/06 (Dad’s birthday)

Shemya2 1944

8/14/2006 09:27 AM


Comment about California Training

csking has posted a comment:

Tec 5 Charlie King 18th Engineers in training or on maneuvers in Calfornia before deployment to Canada and Alaska for construction of the AlCan Highway. Date would be between late 1941 to 5 April 1942 which his papers say was departure date for Canada (arrived 13 April). From other photos I know that one camp where training took place was Camp Hunter Ligget in California.

California Training

8/10/2006 07:02 AM


Comment about Plane crash 1-c

csking has posted a comment:

Thrid of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

Plane crash 1-c

8/1/2006 06:16 AM


Comment about Plane crash 1-b

csking has posted a comment:

Second of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

Plane crash 1-b

8/1/2006 06:15 AM


Comment about Plane crash 1-a

csking has posted a comment:

First of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any way. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

Plane crash 1-a

8/1/2006 06:14 AM


Comment about Bishop’s Lodge wedding

csking has posted a comment:

Bishop’s Lodge is north and east of Santa Fe, New Mexico. I believe the other couple is the soon to be married Joe and Mary Staley.

Bishop's Lodge wedding

7/24/2006 06:13 PM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

csking has posted a comment:

Unknown location in the building of the Al-Can Highway. My Dad, Charlie King, may be driving the cat or he may be the one taking the picture. I believe I’ve seen this very location recently in a documentary or another picture set of the times. Location is probably easily identifiable by anybody highly familiar with the highway. It could be on Lake Kluane.

Charlie's photos (a couple more)

7/20/2006 06:17 AM


Comment about CKing, The Williwaw Wail page 5

csking has posted a comment:

One page from an 18th Engineers news sheet. It is readable if you click on the “All Sizes” button at top and view at the “Original Size.”

From Charlie King’s W.W. II momentos discovered by me in 2005.

CKing, The Williwaw Wail page 5

7/19/2006 12:41 PM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

csking has posted a comment:

War time grim humor during construction of the Al-Can Highway…dehumanizing / disparaging / humiliating the enemy. Not, however, the enemy they would face later on Attu in the Aleutians. Kinda’ makes you wonder if they even knew which enemy the highway was intended to defend against.

Charlie's photos (a couple more)

7/19/2006 12:13 PM


Comment about Charlie King

csking has posted a comment:

Charlie King – photo from about 1957 or 1958.

Charlie King

7/19/2006 11:57 AM


Comment about Jean Roseberry (King)

csking has posted a comment:

My Mother, Wanda Jean Roseberry King, in either her Junior or Senior year of High School. Only a couple of years before meeting my Father, Charlie King.

Jean Roseberry (King)

7/19/2006 11:55 AM


Charlie's photos (more 9...)

7/19/2006 11:52 AM


Charlie's photos (more 9...)

7/19/2006 11:51 AM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 2)

csking has posted a comment:

From Charles King’s war time photo album. On the left is probably from maneuvers in Calfornia before going to Alaska and the on right probably in Washington DC just prior to separation.

Charlie's photos (more 2)

7/19/2006 11:46 AM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

csking has posted a comment:

Sled dog – Al-Can Highway during W.W. II. Photo by Charlie King, 18th Engineers. Judging from the dog’s tail he’s not all that pleased.

Charlie's photos (a couple more)

7/19/2006 10:07 AM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 3)

csking has posted a comment:

Either Les ? or Stanwood Murphy writing letter, duty sheet, or the like during W.W. II on Alcan Highway or Aleutians.

Charlie's photos (more 3)

7/19/2006 10:02 AM


Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 3)

csking has posted a comment:

Duck Hunting – Stan is Stanwood Murphy from San Francisco. Dad said he was from a wealthy family. I did a search for him for Dad on the Internet and was able to find out an impassive and disinterested family member that he had passed away many years ago. Somewhere in Alaska during W.W. II. Photo by Charlie King – 18th Engineers.

Charlie's photos (more 3)

7/19/2006 09:56 AM


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