Search Results for 'technology'



Why blog? Who, me?

Lorelle VanFossen who advocates for blogs as accessible tools (and not as look-at-me! toys) tells this interesting story of another Tolstoy’s Bicyclist. Click below to read the entire post and then visit her other work.

When a friend turned 80, she announced that she was going to buy her first computer. I asked her what she was going to do with it. She didn’t know. “Everyone was talking about it, so I thought I should get one to see what all the fuss is about. Now that I have one…” I could see her mind grinding away at the possibilities as she confronted this more-than-a-television thing….

A woman who once traveled by horse and buggy and lived the first 10 years of her life without electricity wasn’t going to let anything stop her now, not even the learning curve of new technology. […]
http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2007/06/04/are-you-blogging-your-passion-or-blogging-to-blog/

[see earlier posts, Blog readers feedback needed]

Add this to Bookmarks:

Site Search Tags: , , , , , ,

Advertisements

Typewriter repairer 1930 to 20??

click photo to view story

When he started in 1930, Charles Lindbergh’s transatlantic flight was a fresh memory, Herbert Hoover was president, and the Empire State Building was under construction… Whitlock says that he has repaired around 300,000 typewriters in his career. The avocado IBM was job No. 300,001. “If you put the typewriters I’ve repaired end to end, it would take days to drive past them,” he boasts….

A 1910 Oliver is the oldest machine that Whitlock keeps in his shop today. Despite its ears, it is fairly conventional compared with other early typewriter designs. There was the Hammonia, Germany’s first writing machine, which looked like a bread-slicer. The Blickensderfer No. 5, which had keys that stuck out in all directions, making it look, in Whitlock’s words, “sort of like a centipede.” And, best of all, the Williams, which had a “grasshopper” type-action in which a jointed typebar kicked up, over, and down onto the platen roller.

Today, despite his former objections, Whitlock works mostly on electric and electronic typewriters (electrics are mechanical but run by a motor; electronics have computer chips). That’s all people bring. There isn’t any point in keeping manuals other than for decoration and company. […]

continue reading at the Christian Science Monitor

Typist sells tradition
January 23, 2007
Lea Yu, Staff Reporter

Whitlock’s Typewriter Shop is at 272 York St. After 77 years in business, Whitlock continues to reconcile tradition with technology, catering to a new clientele of Yale and New Haven button pushers…

“William Manchester wrote all his books on typewriters and would not let anyone else touch his typewriter,” Frost said. “When Manson moved his shop, Manchester wrote a note comparing him to Leonardo [da Vinci].” … Frost, who majored in computer science at Yale, now repairs computers instead of typewriters and instructs individual offices on computer troubleshooting. He said much of his success comes from applying the valuable work ethic he acquired while watching Whitlock manage his business.

read more […]


Site Search Tags:

Add this to Bookmarks:

Senior Center Self-Assessment

The Joint Committee on Senior Centers is comprised of members of the Pennsylvania Association of Senior Centers, the Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. They have a number of other resources, Learn about items of Special Interest

The following checklist has been designed to help you think about your Center from the “first impression” perspective. These are some of the things you could be looking at in your Center to prepare to make a positive, lasting impression on those who come to your Center.

If you are answering “no” to questions, you may want to look at modifying or improving that item. For best results, have a person who is unfamiliar with the Center complete the survey. Problems that we see on a daily basis can sometimes become “invisible” to our eyes.

This checklist can help prepare your Center to be in the best position possible for welcoming the new seniors who respond to the Senior Center Marketing Initiative of June 2002. Prepared by the Joint Committee on Senior Centers, February 2002.

The checklist is available as a pdf file here,

Compare this checklist with the one for the Bethel senior center, When you visit the senior center https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2005/08/06/when-you-visit-the-senior-center/ and try it out, Grabbing public toilets https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/10/24/grabbing-public-toilets/ or Visit Bethel Alaska’s Eddie Hoffman Senior Center

1 OUTSIDE AREAS

1. Is there clear signage identifying the location of the Center from the road?
2. Is a sign posted next to or above the entrance door to the Center so participants can easily find it upon approach to the Center?
3. Is the building exterior free from peeling paint or other repairs?
4. Is the parking lot free from debris and weeds?
5. Is the walkway and parking lot adequately lighted?
6. Are the shrubs, outside plants and lawn well maintained?
7. Are outside walkways free of hazardous objects, including debris, weeds and uneven or broken steps?
8. Is outdoor furniture clean and in good shape?
9. Is there easy access for individuals with disabilities?
10. Are rails leading to the doors secure and well maintained?
11. Are curbs painted to signify distinction of levels?
12. Is the outside of the Center attractive and inviting?

2 INSIDE AREAS

1. Is there adequate lighting in rooms, corridors, elevators and stairways?
2. Are guests acknowledged promptly when they enter your Center?
3. Would the atmosphere be characterized as pleasant?
4. Is there a pleasant smell when entering the Center?
5. Is the Center clean enough to meet your personal standards?
6. Is the area inside clutter free, not only on the floor, but also in the space surrounding it?
7. Is the furniture attractive and easy to get in and out of?
8. Is the furniture arranged to promote interaction and conversation?
9. Are magazines, books or other materials for activities neatly stacked and out of the path of travel?
10. Are curtains and window treatments clean and in good condition?
11. Is there an easy to find and easy to read bulletin board with activities, meal schedules and other current information?
12. Is the activity board or other written materials hanging at a readable level for elderly persons of different heights?
13. Are certificates and licenses posted, if required?
14. Is the lighting adequate for older persons?
15. Is the dining area attractive and inviting?
16. Are participants able to sit where they want during meal times without being assigned?
17. Is the kitchen clean and inviting?
18. Is the meal contribution policy, sign-in sheet, and contribution box easy to locate?
19. Does the noise level allow for conversations and quiet activities?

3 SAFETY

1. Are changes in floor levels or coverings distinct enough to prevent tripping?
2. Are carpets free from wear and frayed ends?
3. Are small rugs and runners slip-resistant and non-moving?
4. Are lamp, extension and telephone cords placed out of the flow of traffic?
5. Are chairs sturdy and not easily tipped?
6. Are there handrails in hallways and grab bars in bathrooms?
7. Are written emergency evacuation plans with center floor plans posted throughout the Center?
8. Is a fire extinguisher easy to find and do participants know how to use one?
9. Are emergency numbers posted near the phone?
10. Are smoke detectors properly located and in working condition?
11. Are hallways, passageways between rooms, and other heavy traffic areas equally well lit?
12. Are exits and passageways free from clutter?
13. In the kitchen area, are towels, curtains, and other things that might catch fire located away from the range?
14. Are all extension cords and appliance cords located away from the sink or range areas?
15. Are emergency exits clearly marked?
16. Is emergency lighting functional and adequate?

4 PROGRAM AND SERVICES

1. Are the Center hours and days of operation posted for participants?
2. Can Center hours be changed or altered if requested?
3. Is access to computers and the internet available?
4. Does the Center offer a wide variety of activities for different interests?
5. Are fitness activities offered regularly?
6. Are participants involved with planning activities?
7. Are costs for activities known to individuals?
8. Are other community groups or non-profits involved with Center activities?
9. Are you conducting marketing/advertising activities in your local area?
10. Are you making use of internet technology for advertising?
11. Are newsletters listing activities and menus given or sent to participants on a regular basis?
12. Is there a posted calendar of activities or a newsletter available for people who enter the Center?
13. Are new participants given an orientation to the Center?
14. Is there a welcoming committee made up of current participants to help make newcomers feel comfortable?


Technorati Tags: , , ,
Site Search Tags: , , ,

Universal Design grant

Speaking of engineering needs, usability and Seating–modify, buy, or build

here’s an opportunity to find funding to design a way for locals to design and build adequate seating for local people (appropriate technology).

4) Universal Design

The National Endowment for the Arts requests proposals for the Universal Design Leadership Project. Work would include creating greater public awareness of and demand for universal designed environments. The intent of universal design is to simplify life for everyone by making products, communications, and the built environment more usable by as many people as possible at little or no extra cost.

$50K expected to be available, 1 award anticipated. Responses due 11/2/06 [ deadline]. For more info, contact William Hummel at contracts AT arts DOT gov or go to:

Notice of this comes from Solicitations an E-mail list.

If anyone you know would like to sign up to receive these funding newsletters, have them send an e-mail request to laurie DOT brown AT ceepinc DOT org. Include subscriber’s e-mail address in the body of the message.


Site Search Tags: , , , ,

another engineering project needed

Here’s a description of why a better walker and cane are needed. (Let’s hear it for perceptive participant-observation!) One thing I’ve noticed locally is that almost no one has a cane of the proper length. How can one be assisted by, much less weaned off of, a device which is incorrectly sized? Worse, ill-fitted and ill-designed devices can cripple.

http://themomandmejournals.net/2005/10/heres-worthy-problem-for-engineers.html


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , , ,

« Previous PageNext Page »


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
October 2019
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 196,346 visitors
Advertisements