Search Results for 'sustainable'



new life-course for an aging society

There needs to be an adjustment of living to fit the lifespan, but this seems an incomplete assessment. For example, if older workers weren’t discriminated against in hiring and in employment quality, I doubt there would be so few participating in work. The other bizarre aspect of changing demography, at least in the USA, is the voiced-in-public wondering Where is the educated workforce (and the post-bachelors educated)? I’d believe more in this “brains deficit” if I didn’t know so many bright people who are under- and un-employed against their will.

Of particular significance to western Alaska or any other small island developing state or rural province is the need as well to adjust social living to fit space. That is, many people, traditionally or as a “modern” adaptation, have seasonal residences. People work in one location, sleep in another or visit relatives and friends throughout an annual or multi-annual round. Remittances are sent around; children are sent around; knowledge is sent around. (Global kula ring)
Continue reading ‘new life-course for an aging society’

CHECKLIST FOR STAIRWAYS, ESPECIALLY FOR HOMES

This comes from the National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modification, which has lots of other nifty resources in their library for Strategies for Aging in Place

Their main site is featuring

Our vision is to create a Center of excellence to ensure the independence, safety, and well being of older persons through fall prevention. Our mission is to provide leadership, create new knowledge, and develop sustainable programs for seniors and their families, professionals, program administrators, and policy makers.

CHECKLIST FOR STAIRWAYS, Recommended by Jake Pauls, CPE

GENERAL

[ ] Locate steps only where they are necessary and logical.
[ ] Avoid small changes of levels, especially single steps.
[ ] Use safety glazing for glass that could be impacted in a fall on a stairway.
[ ] Arrange for any doors adjacent to steps not to swing over any steps.
[ ] Install gates to prevent infant and toddler use.
[ ] Avoid sudden changes of views and visual distractions from stairways.
[ ] Make steps visually prominent so that their presence is obvious.

STEPS

[ ] Build step riser dimensions no higher than 180 mm or 7 inches.
[ ] Build step tread dimensions at least 280 mm or 11 inches front to back.
[ ] Keep risers and treads consistent in size (to within 5 mm or 3/16 inch).
[ ] Conspicuously mark flights having inconsistently sized steps; e.g. paint a contrasting stripe (25 to 50 mm, 1 to 2 inches wide) on all stepnosings (right at the leading edges of the treads) so that the nonuniformity stands out.
[ ] Remove thick (10 mm, 3/8 inch, or more) carpets and underpads on treads.
[ ] Fix tread coverings securely; coverings must be tight against the nosings.
[ ] Remove/repair tripping surfaces and projecting screws or nails on treads.
[ ] Provide slip-resistant (rough) finish on stair treads subject to wetting.
[ ] If stairs are subject to wetting, slope treads approximately 1 percent (1/8 inch per foot) to drain water away from nosings.
[ ] If nosings project (and they do not need to if treads are 280 mm, 11 inches, deep), keep nosing projections uniform in the flight and configure them so that there is no tripping hazard to persons with poor foot control.

VISIBILITY

[ ] Provide slightly rounded nosings (maximum radius 13 mm, 0.5 inch) for visibility and injury reduction.
[ ] Avoid tread materials and coverings with visually distracting patterns.
[ ] Mark nosings permanently (not with tape) if they are not distinctly visible. Note that a painted stripe even works very well, and looks good, on carpet.
[ ] Provide lighting that makes tread nosings distinctly visible.
[ ] Provide lighting that does not cause glare or strong shadows.
[ ] Illuminate stairs with no less than two bulbs (especially if incandescent).
[ ] Have light levels on stairs at least as high as on adjacent areas.
[ ] Unless continuously lit or automatically switched on, provide light switches at each point of stairway access.
[ ] Install permanently illuminated, small light sources (e.g., night lights) on stairs.

HANDRAILS

[ ] Provide at least one handrail on each stair regardless of the number of steps.
[ ] On wide, monumental stairways provide at least one handrail at the normal path of travel. If used by crowds, space handrails 1525 mm (60 inches) apart.
[ ] Continue handrails between stair flights at the shortest path of travel.
[ ] Extend the handrail, without a break, the full length of the stair between floors.
[ ] Augment any decorative stair railing system with a functional handrail.
[ ] Install a handrail around which fingers and thumb can encircle. If you wrap a measuring tape around the railing, the loop should be shorter than 160 mm (6 1/4 inches) for adult hands. A smaller railing is desirable for children.
[ ] Maintain adequate hand clearance between the handrail and nearby surfaces.
[ ] Position handrails at about adult elbow height, 900-1000 mm or 36-39 inches.
[ ] Provide handrails that are visually prominent.
[ ] Repair or replace broken handrails.
[ ] Fix handrails securely to walls and posts. You should be able to bear your entire weight on the handrail without damaging the handrail.

« Previous Page


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • ROBERT REA WALKER, AGE 97 - 1057news.com
    ROBERT REA WALKER, AGE 97  1057news.com
  • Longtime Camel Pawn Shop owner Harris Clein dies at age 90 - Winston-Salem Journal
    Longtime Camel Pawn Shop owner Harris Clein dies at age 90  Winston-Salem Journal
  • Lotte Group founder dies at age 98 - UPI News
    Lotte Group founder dies at age 98  UPI News
  • Doc Shurlow, physician to Clare County, dead at age 90 - The Morning Sun
    Doc Shurlow, physician to Clare County, dead at age 90  The Morning Sun
  • Virginia B. Schmitz, 95 | MN South News - New Prague Times
    Virginia B. Schmitz, 95 | MN South News  New Prague Times
  • Longtime Bakersfield educator Don Pruett dies at age 92 - KGET 17
    Longtime Bakersfield educator Don Pruett dies at age 92  KGET 17
  • Sister of Charity of Cincinnati Rosalie Riggio dies at age 90 - The Catholic Telegraph
    Sister of Charity of Cincinnati Rosalie Riggio dies at age 90  The Catholic Telegraph
  • Lawrence Michael Haider Jr., 90, Belgrade - WJON News
    Lawrence Michael Haider Jr., 90, Belgrade  WJON News
  • Mrs. Zelma Lucille Clements, age 92, of Rome - Coosa Valley News
    Mrs. Zelma Lucille Clements, age 92, of Rome  Coosa Valley News
  • Mrs. Mary Lee Towe Prince, age 93, of Rome - Coosa Valley News
    Mrs. Mary Lee Towe Prince, age 93, of Rome  Coosa Valley News
January 2020
M T W T F S S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 197,093 visitors