Search Results for 'long-term care'



Call for presentations AIAN Long Term Care conference

The 3rd Annual AIAN Long Term Care conference will be in Albuquerque, September 5-7, 2007. We’re still looking for presenters for IHS and Tribal Long Term Care programs. We are hoping once again to have travel stipends available for presenters through a grant from the Retirement Research Foundation.

Please take a minute and send in an abstract before April 30th [deadline] – we hope to select the presenters shortly after that deadline and offer invitations. This will give both Tribal and federal programs plenty of time to make their arrangements for travel.

Visit the conference website at http://www.aianlongtermcare.org. In addition to promising practices and model programs in LTC, we will have intensive daylong workshops on the PACE and Green House models of long term care.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Best regards, Bruce Bruce Finke, MD Acting Chief Medical Officer Nashville Area Indian Health Service IHS Elder Health Consultant, ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV
413-584-0790
615-727-2044 (cell)


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Getcare.com Checklist Summary

http://www.getcare.com/learn/checklistsummary.shtml

Our checklists are designed to help you select care providers that best meet your needs. You can view the checklist for any service type simply by clicking on ‘checklist’ in the table below. You may also click on any service type to learn about it.

Print the checklists before you visit or speak with potential care providers and they’ll remind you what to look for and what to ask. Your completed checklists will make it easier to compare providers and make informed decisions.

In-Home Care
Home Care Services checklist
Home Health Care checklist
Hospice checklist
Home-Delivered Meals checklist
Community Health and Social Services
Adult Day Services checklist
Meal Programs checklist
Senior Center checklist
Transportation checklist
Medical Services
Rehabilitation Services checklist
Residential Facilities
Assisted Living checklist
Board and Care Home checklist
Congregate Housing checklist
Hospice checklist
Independent Living Community checklist
Nursing Home checklist
Care Coordination and Other Services
Care Manager checklist
Elder Law Attorney checklist
Long-Term Care Insurance checklist


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Liz Taylor takes comments

One of the best reads ever on aging deliberately is Liz Taylor–
Her series has been mentioned previously –

I just discovered that the columns published at Kitsap Sun Stories: Liz Taylor: Aging Deliberately allow comments (registration required) and have an RSS feed . This is so much more convenient and useful than the Seattle Times venue. I’m not sure which is the primary home for Liz’s work, however, and Kitsap may not carry all her columns. At the Seattle Times I have to subscribe by E-mail to their health series (once a week e-mail, all health stories which are interesting) to get notice of her columns. Otherwise I have a Google News Alert for Liz Taylor+ aging, which sometimes brings in notice of National Velvet. [the colors behind some items below mean nothing except straightening out the code remains to be done.]

Liz Taylor began her career as a federal consumer-fraud investigator and was appointed by Elizabeth Dole in 1976 to direct a nationwide investigation of the nursing-home industry. She’s worked in the aging field ever since.

In the 1980s, Liz became one of the first geriatric care managers in the Pacific Northwest, working with thousands of families and older adults to find high-quality services. In 2000, she founded Aging Deliberately, a business that teaches people how to prepare for their aging so they’ll have more control over what happens to them. In 2005, she served as a delegate to the White House Conference on Aging. She’s won the American Geriatrics Society’s 2007 Aging Awareness Media Award and the Washington Association of Homes and Services for the Aging’s Excellence in Media Award. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/growingolder/

It’s relatively easy to age successfully if you’re wealthy. Money can’t buy happiness, but it certainly allows you to buy the things that make life more comfortable at any age. 1/26/2008 11:00 PM
In my last column, I wrote about a growing problem: what to do when an older person who has dementia hasn’t named anyone she trusts to make decisions for her. This week I’ll tackle a tougher issue: what to do when the person she names does a poor job. 11/17/2007 11:00 PM
My e-mail has had a repeated theme recently: An older person with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, isn’t paying bills, preparing meals, bathing, and other important tasks — but refuses to allow anyone to help.
11/3/2007 09:00 PM |
There’s a certain uniformity to finding a physician under Medicare these days. Rich or poor, if you’re 65 or older, you’re likely to have similar slim pickings (more so if you’re poor and on Medicare and Medicaid). 10/20/2007 11:00 PM |
Most of us want to live a long time, but nobody wants to grow old. The irony is, most of us will — live a long time and grow old. It’s easy to do — all it takes is letting the days roll by. As long as you’re healthy, getting old is a piece of cake.
10/6/2007 11:00 PM |
It’s easy as pie to age well when you’re healthy. The friction comes when you become frail. Sometimes it’s self-inflicted, the product of isolation, poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and falls — all common problems for people who age in their homes but don’t plan it correctly. 9/22/2007 11:00 PM |
A woman in her late 70s, a good friend, is pondering her options. Her home is two stories (or three, including the basement), with many stairs to her bedroom, bathroom and the washing machine. 9/8/2007 11:00 PM
Dad is 87, fun and funny, with moderate dementia. He lived “on the edge” in his own home for years while we kids worried sick. 7/28/2007 11:00 PM
When I was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, cars were sort of round and later sort of square. My dad wore a hat to work and took the bus.
7/14/2007 11:00 PM
I’m 75 and have lived in an assisted-living facility for a year.
7/8/2007 02:00 AM
Older people are not simply younger people with wrinkles our bodies change dramatically as we age, both inside and out; some parts wear out before others, sometimes several at once.
6/17/2007 02:00 AM
Whether you live at home, in a retirement community, or in a yurt on top of a mountain, as you age, you want to do it consciously.
6/3/2007 02:00 AM

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nesting in place

Liz Taylor’s articles are linked on the sidebar. She practices aging in place, too.

By Rebecca Teagarden

LIZ TAYLOR IS a specialist in matters of aging and long-term care…. “Let’s talk about what the boomers need to think about as 77 million of us grow old — in a society that’s not at all prepared,” she says.

“It’s not one thing, but a combination — and more attitude and planning than architectural. When I see older people moving into two- and three-story humongous houses all around me, I think living on one level is probably the most important thing you can do to age in place.

“That, and exercise!”

… I’m almost ready for the rest of my life.”

“Almost” means Taylor wants to make her property available to friends, perhaps building two or three more small houses there so the group can care for each other or possibly share a caregiver.

Taylor would offer part of her house, either the main house or the B&B suite, to the caregiver. She hopes that attractive housing will attract more caregiving candidates. To pay for the help, Taylor bought long-term-care insurance seven years ago. She also serves on an island task force planning for Bainbridge’s growth over the next 20 years. She is working to change island zoning and sewer ordinances to permit such huddled housing….

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

The Federal agency, Administration on Aging, has a preparedness guide. One is for general emergency assistance and one is specific to a pandemic influenza.

Unfortunately, each Emergency Assistance Guide chapter is it’s own pdf file to download, Start here,
http://www.aoa.gov/press/preparedness/preparedness.asp

For a copy of the Letter from the Assistant Secretary about Pandemic Flu preparation (pdf file)  click here.

 For a copy of the AoA Pandemic Flu Plan (pdf file)  click here.

A copy of the “Long-Term Care and Other Residential Facilities Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Checklist” is available at http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/LongTermCareChecklist.html.

Preparedness suggestions include:

  • Have a structure for planning and decision-making, with a multidisciplinary group created to specifically pandemic influenza preparedness planning.
  • Develop a written pandemic influenza plan that identifies the person or persons authorized to implement the plan and the organizational structure to be used.
  • Develop a facility communication plan that includes key points of contact such as local and state health department officials, and a person responsible for communicating with staff, residents and families.
  • Have a plan to provide education and training to ensure that all personnel, residents and family members of residents understand basic prevention and control measures for pandemic influenza.
  • Have an infection control plan in place for managing residents and visitors with pandemic influenza.
  • Have a plan to get and use vaccines and antiviral drugs.
  • Address issues related to sudden increased needs, such as prioritizing services, staffing and supply shortages, and alternative care for residents who need acute care when hospital beds are unavailable.

I haven’t had a chance to review these yet. I have yet to see any evidence of local planning for the elderly. We just last week went through breakup and spring flooding. It happens every year. Yet once again an elder was moved to higher ground, but without taking along the required meds which were left in the house or clinic.

Also, no one recalls a fire drill in the past several (five +?) years at the senior center. See the checklist for When you visit the senior center – https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2005/08/06/when-you-visit-the-senior-center/

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