Search Results for 'grandmother'



Intergenerational Approaches to HIV/AIDS Prevention

2007 Intergenerational Approaches to HIV/AIDS Prevention Education with Women Across the Lifespan Pilot Program Grant
deadline: Jul 02, 2007

http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=13759
The purpose of the Intergenerational Approaches to HIV/AIDS Prevention Education with Women Across the Lifespan Pilot Program is to develop cross-generational HIV/AIDS prevention education approaches specific to women at risk for or living with HIV/AIDS and other female members of the family 12+ years old , particularly African American, Native American/American Indian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian/Pacific Islander women from the Diaspora who are grandmothers, mothers, daughters, granddaughters, and aunts. [Grants.gov Opportunities Posting Update]

It probably would support condom amulets, too.
From the always useful, BHIC blog focuses on health information issues related to the community, especially underserved communities.

http://library.med.utah.edu/blogs/BHIC/archives/cat_scholarships_and_grants.html#002287

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Dr. Lydia T. Black

Dr Lydia T. Black, at Kenai Fjord, July, 2002 by grandson, Andrew McEvoy

Dr. Black survived Stalin, forced labor under the Nazis, refugee status, and never suffered fools, the pompous, the bully, nor laziness or sloppy scholarship. She was fond of cats, dogs, children, and those needing a friend in a strange land.

The following is summarized from documents at Lydia T. Black 1925 to 2007 and from the Kodiak Daily Mirror

Widowed with young children at 44, she went to college and finished her BA and MA in two years and her Ph.D. in another two years.

She studied at Northeastern University and Brandeis University in the Boston area before receiving her doctorate from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She joined the faculty of anthropology in 1973 at Providence College in Rhode Island. She moved to Alaska in 1984 as Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks, whence she “retired” in 1998.

She continued her work in Kodiak, where she helped translate and catalogue Russian archives of St. Herman’s Seminary. The Orthodox Church in Alaska recognized her contribution by awarding her the Cross of St. Herman.

She wrote at least 66 more books and articles appearing in publications as diverse as Natural History, Arctic Anthropology and Studies in Soviet Thought and was a contributor to various exhibits and conferences on the Arctic, including the Library of Congress’ Meeting of the Frontiers, the New York Museum of Natural History’s Jesup Centenary Congress and the Smithsonian Institution’s Crossroads of the Continents.

One of her best-known books, “Aleut art — Unangam aguqaadangin” is a collection of beautifully photographed and carefully documented art made by Alaska Natives of the Aleutian Islands. Another, “Russians in Alaska, 1732 to 1867,” was published in 2004, the year Lydia turned 79.

In 2001, Russia awarded her the Order of Friendship, honoring her contribution to promoting cross-cultural understanding between Russia and America. She received the Alaska Anthropological Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000 and the Alaska Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Award for the Humanities in 2005.

Lydia was born in Kiev, where her grandmother came to live with the family. Her grandmother instituted an educational regimen for her which included two days per week of speaking Russian, two days per week of speaking French and two days per week of speaking German. On Sundays, the family could relax and speak Ukrainian. It was decreed that Lydia would study English in school. Lydia’s grandmother would take her to the ‘secret church’, hosted by three elderly women – the KGB eventually did arrive to arrest them.

Lydia’s father was executed when she was eight years old. At 16 (1941) her mother died of TB. Lydia was picked up into forced labor for Germany. At war’s end, Lydia was in Munich and got a job scrubbing toilets in American officers’ quarters. They realized Lydia could speak six languages (she had learned Polish during the war) so she became a translator at the UNRRA’s displaced children’s camp.

Lydia met and married Igor A. Black. They then emigrated to the U.S. in 1950. Igor became a thermodynamics engineer whose work on the Apollo Mission was officially commemorated by NASA. Lydia was a full-time wife and mother. Suddenly Igor died in 1969, leaving Lydia alone with three teen-aged daughters and a toddler. With her older daughters’ consent, Lydia returned to school as a full-time college student.

Dr Black died in Kodiak, AK, with family, friends, Orthodox services, and the feline sibling companions Masia and Vasia present. Masia, brother Vasia, and companion human Lydia Black
Masia, faithful guardian during Lydia’s illness would wake Lydia in the middle of the night, to great complaint. However, Masia seemed to be sensing something physically awry in Lydia’s breathing while asleep and was waking her to “reset” her. Masia would reach over and: Slap-slap-slap, at which point Lydia would sputter and tell the cat to stop it. [Click on small picture to enlarge.]

Anthropologist Lydia Black Dead at 81
Casey Kelly, KMXT

KODIAK, AK (2007-03-13) Anthropologist Lydia Black, author of many books on Alaska Native culture and Alaska history, died Monday morning of liver failure at her home in Kodiak. She was 81. © Copyright 2007, apti

audio file (mp3 format), click to play or right click to download and save.


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meth and elder abuse

Elder abuse pre-dates methamphetamine but this seems even uglier than alcohol abuse in some ways. Elder abuse and neglect exists because bullying is tolerated. The elderlies need to stick together and insist on their rights and protections. Senior centers and church pastors are required to report abuse and neglect (of course, senior centers should not contribute to neglect, either).

Even the smallest Village or Pueblo can take an extra minute to check on folks. In New Mexico, some of the tribal solid waste management planning included an option for the trash haulers to

  • teach recycling and sanitation
  • to stop by each older person’s or shut-in’s residence for a wellness check and pick up trash,
  • and to be trained to know the signs of abuse or neglect.

Friday, February 9 – Elder Abuse:
As the methamphetamine epidemic spreads across Indian Country, reports of elder abuse are on the rise. In some cases, elders are having their retirement checks and supplementary tribal checks stolen by relatives addicted to meth and other drugs. Tribal officials across the nation are putting together infrastructures designed to protect the welfare of our grandmothers and grandfathers. Whatever happened to respecting our elders? Guests include Wilson Wewa (Northern Paiute) Team Leader with the Warm Springs Reservation Senior Program.

Tune in and take part in this intense and stimulating one-hour call-in radio talk show inspiring people from all walks of life to reflect on Native American issues and how they influence our lives. Call toll free at 1-800-996-2848 (1-800-99-NATIV) You can listen to Native America Calling LIVE on-line. Or visit the web site at

Sept. 10 US Grandparents Day

News Headlines from The Christian Science Monitor
http://www.csmonitor.com/

More and more grandparents tend to grandkids
On Sept. 10, the US celebrates Grandparents Day, and with 56 million US grandfathers and grandmothers, there are many good reasons to mark the occasion. Increasingly, however, grandparents aren’t just the warm and generous relatives who visit their families on holidays or call with greetings on special occasions. They are active caregivers to children, especially in this day and age of working couples and single-parent households. Grandparents are often asked or volunteer to help tend their grandchildren, sometimes out of financial necessity. Statistics provided by the Census Bureau that help fill out the picture:

Children living with grandparents 6.1 million

Grandparents responsible for most of the basic needs of live-in grandchildren 2.4 million

Foreign-born grandparents caring for grandchildren 320,000

Grandparents who’ve cared for grandchildren at least five years 920,000

Grandparents in poverty caring for grandchildren 460,000


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Elderbloggers Stake Their Claim

This is from the NY Times,
which usually requires a free registration to read. If you haven’t tried reading blogs or even writing your own, take a look at the article and sample Ronni’s blog and blogroll, linked to the right of this page under more to share. O’Folks, off their rocker is on there, too! although we tend to be more informational rather than expository.

With a breadth of experience and perspective, older bloggers are staking out a place in the blogosphere — a medium overwhelmingly dominated by the young. Perhaps more attentive to grammar and less likely to use cutesy cyberspeak, older bloggers expound on topics as varied as poetry and politics, gardening and grandmothering. According to a recent report by the Perseus Development Corporation, a research company that studies online trends, the Internet is home to approximately 54.3 million blogs, nearly 60 percent written by people younger than 19. Just 0.3 percent of blogs are run by people 50 or older, yet that’s still about 160,000 bloggers.

“I’m a big, big advocate of older people blogging,” said Ronni Bennett, 65, author of the large and active Time Goes By (timegoesby.net). The “blogroll” on the left-hand side of her site has links to more than 100 blogs written by people 50 and older, many of them 65 and older….Blogging helps keep older minds sharp, offers a platform in which to express views and opens social networks all over the world, Ms. Bennett said.

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O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

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