Search Results for 'family'



Another resource for in-situ eldercare

I ran across this link from the state’s health and human services department. Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about it. The parent website isn’t helpful. It sounds like a health payment manager of some sort; sort of a personal Medicaid manager, maybe, authorized under contract to the state. It would certainly be a useful role for families or individuals looking for individual home health care. It doesn’t sound like it is an employer. It might be useful if a family member wishes to become a caregiver and receive Medicaid or insurance coverage for that service. I know there are other programs to train family members as caregivers (can’t remember the specific programs, sorry. However, the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. once had training for personal care attendants, PCA)

The company homepage is almost no help.

“CDPC performs fiscal intermediary functions for the Consumer, including processing time sheets, billing Medicaid, and caregiver payroll. CDPC provides training for the Consumer and resources for caregiver training and also assists the Consumer in maintaining program compliance.”

The Arizona program description is a bit more helpful–

“What is Consumer-Directed Personal Care?
Consumer-Directed Care is available to individuals who need attendant care services in their home. Self-Directed care puts you in control, allowing you to arrange and direct your own services. You select, train and manage your caregiver who may be a trusted friend, neighbor or relative. Individuals must be capable of directing their own services or arranging for a representative to act on their behalf.”

Contact info for the Alaska program is http://www.consumerdirectonline.net/alaska/ Anyone have any experience with this group?

Invited by the state in 2001 to help develop the Consumer Directed Personal Care Services Program, we are proud to be part of communities across the state of Alaska by supporting and promoting self-directed personal care services. The program is specifically intended to allow individuals with health care needs to remain in their homes and communities avoiding placement in an institution. This program is designed for individuals who are capable of directing their own personal care services or appointing a Personal Representative to act on their behalf.

Alaska program requirements include:
* Eligibility for Alaska Medicaid
* The need for assistance with activities of daily
living such as:
– medication reminders – transfers
– bathing & hygiene – dressing & grooming
– ambulation – eating
– toileting, bowel & bladder care
* Authorization by a health care professional that assistance is necessary
* Completion of an assessment for placement in the program
* There is no age requirement in the state of Alaska

Contact a program coordinator at:
Anchorage
The Emerald Building
615 East 82nd Ave, Suite 101
Anchorage, AK 99518
Phone: (907) 222-2652
Toll free: 1- 888 – 966-8777
Fax: (907) 677-8777
infoAK AT ConsumerDirectOnline DOT net

Wasilla
Kenai
Kodiak


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Grants, fellowships– caregivers, planning, poetry

Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program
Supported by The Atlantic Philanthropies and administered by Columbia University, this national program seeks to provide professionals in health and aging with the experience and skills necessary to make a positive contribution to the development and implementation of health policies that affect older Americans. Deadline extended: May 27, 2008. For more information, see http://www.healthandagingpolicy.org/apply/index.html

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Family and Informal Caregiver Support Program
The Weinberg Foundation will help community partnerships develop innovative ways to support these devoted caregivers. Available Funding: Up to $9 million over three years, the Family and Informal Caregiver Support Program will support from 12 to 20 community-based Projects with grants ranging from $100,000 to $300,000 per year. Deadline: Letters of Inquiry: Thursday, June 12, 2008 http://www.epa.gov/aging/grants/grant-list/2008_0612_grant_ofo_1.htm

Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program

The Indian Health Service announces the availability of grants to support planning and implementation of sustainable long-term care services for American Indians and Alaska Native elders. Deadline: June 20, 2008.
http://www.ihs.gov/NonMedicalPrograms/gogp/index.cfm?module=HHS-2008-IHS-LTC-0001


2nd Annual Rachel Carson Intergenerational Poetry, Essay and Photo Contest

The EPA Aging Initiative, in partnership with Generations United and the Rachel Carson Council, Inc., is inviting submissions for its Second Annual Rachel Carson Sense of Wonder Intergenerational Poetry, Essay and Photography Contest. The contest’s intergenerational approach reflects Carson’s desire to have adults and children share a sense of wonder about nature to discover nature’s gifts. Entries must be an intergenerational project. The deadline for entries is Monday, June 16, 2008. For more information see http://www.epa.gov/aging/resources/thesenseofwonder/index.htm

revised 2008-04-19
[from BHIC. See sidebar. Because so many older people are now raising their grandchildren, this program may be of interest.]

Mentoring Children of Prisoners: Caregiver’s Choice Program
Caregiver’s Choice makes it possible for many more kids across the country to have mentors, and for many more families to enjoy all the benefits of mentoring. This program is unique because it gives the child’s caregiver the power to choose—to look at the possibilities and decide on the best mentoring program to meet their needs and the needs of the child. Through Caregiver’s Choice, you can: – Access funding to serve more children; – Tap into federal funds; – Manage your participation level; – Leverage national efforts to recruit children of prisoners; and – Benefit from cutting-edge training and tools. For more information visit, http://www.mentoring.org/find_resources/caregiverschoice/


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Picturing Alaska history : USA territory to statehood

Turner Publishing (http://www.turnerpublishing.com) asked if I would consider reviewing a new book. I’m glad I agreed. Historic Photos of Alaska has just been published, a large format book of black and white photographs from the period 1867 to 1979. Dermot Cole, long-time columnist for the Fairbanks Daily Newsminer, provides the text and captions.

As a journalist, Dermot also has an interest in history (apart from his twin brother, Terrance, history professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks). Dermot Cole is the author of Amazing Pipeline Stories published by Epicenter Press in 1997, about the people and Fairbanks during the Alaska oil pipeline construction.

The perspective of Historic Photos of Alaska, is for those readers outside Alaska. That is, this is a pictorial history of Alaska as part of “America”. [Through no fault of this book, many in the US will still consider Alaska as a foreign body, along with New Mexico.]

The photos are arranged by time periods, from purchase to statehood– 1867-1905, 1906-1919, 1920-1940, and 1941-1979. These periods represent significant periods of US and Alaska relations. The orientation is a deliberate effort to stand apart from the usual Alaskana picture books. Another significant difference in this book is the choice of rarely seen photos and not the ubiquitous ones. The photos are reproduced with sufficient quality to review again and again and see something new each time.

Readers can follow themes such as regional changes (southeast Alaska also known as the Northwest Coast compared to Nome in northwest Alaska) and transportation. However, other themes can be chosen by readers according to personal interest.

    Dogs
    Most of the dogs are Alaska huskies (freight variety), such as ones on pages 44 and 55 and in harness, page 58. However, the team on page 67 is actually part of a Saami family (reindeer herders originally from Scandinavia. Note the hats and boot toes.) The harness setup is very different from that of the Eskimo family team on page 128. There are also sporting dogs (early 20th century conformation) such as the one on page 92 belonging to Jim Haly. Look carefully. The dog has just spotted another dog out of view, and kicked up a cloud of dust with his hind legs.

    Electric trees
    Even on the frozen tundra of Nome (page 111) and sprouting ever more branches over time in populated areas such as Cordova page 120 and Fairbanks page 151.

    Military
    One way to trace the influence of the military in Alaska is through men’s hats in the photos. Since Territorial days, the military has been a significant economic and development force in Alaska. Much of the early geological studies and geodetic surveys were military. World War II and then the Cold War continued the inflow of money and people. Photos from pages 168 to 180 show differing aspects of building the Al-Can or Alaska Highway and the later battles of Attu and the Aleutians. (see related posts here on the Al-Can and the Aleutians, https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/special-projects/photo-index-cking-wwii/)

    Miscellany
    Everywhere. The curiosity of Edwardian women’s fashion in open-air fish camp (useful against mosquitoes I suppose); the plank streets (for cars and horses) 400 miles from the nearest highway; even a Piggly-Wiggly store outside of the South.

Dermot Cole avoided the shop worn stash of Alaska photos. However, the next to last photo, page 197, is of the oil pipeline’s zigzagged engineering (to avoid temperature stresses) up the North Slope and over the Brooks Mountain Range. It’s a clever homage to the iconic Klondike gold rush photo of the future miners traipsing up the Chilkoot Pass.

I do have some quibbles with the book. There is an amazing variety of horses depicted but no photos of cows at Creamer’s Dairy in Fairbanks (I like the image of the wood stove chimney peeking out the milk truck to keep contents from freezing at 40 below).

More importantly, an outline map of Alaska is needed, with the places of photos identified.

The southwest of Alaska is mostly excluded. Considering that most folks in or outside Alaska believe everyone lives in an Eskimo igloo, it would also be helpful to include a map of languages/cultural regions in the state. Most readers will not be aware of the significance of the temporary, river going, hide boat depicted on page 44 built by the Athabascan Indian trapper to bring his skins to market. Compare with the more permanent skin boat built by Iñupiat Eskimo marine hunters on page 103. I already noted the Saami family.

The period of the first half of 1919 is missing although extremely important in the demography and history of non-urban Alaska. Upwards of 80% to 100% of people in some communities died during the pandemic of the “Spanish Flu”. The Jesse Lee Home (I ran across this recently published history) was one of several that cared for orphans left behind (those that survived long enough for help to reach them).

A suggested reading list would be nice, including Steven Langdon’s 1993. The Native People of Alaska. Anchorage, AK : Greatland Graphics. ISBN: 0936425172 9780936425177 OCLC: 27405205

A great companion volume would be John S. Whitehead’s 2004. Completing the Union: Alaska, Hawaii, and the Battle for Statehood. Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press. ISBN: 0826336361 9780826336361 082633637X 9780826336378, OCLC: 55665367

This book is not supposed to be a comprehensive pictorial history. Cole did an amazing job just to make a selection from all the possibilities and put together such an enjoyable book.


——————-
[Dermot Cole. 2008 Historic Photos of Alaska. Nashville: Turner Publishing Co.
# ISBN-10: 1596524243
# ISBN-13: 978-1596524248
# LoC 2007938665
Hardcover: 216 pages, Language: English, Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 10.1 x 1 inches, list price $39.95]


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Amenities for those in LTC

Maya’s Granny (see sidebar) unfortunately had a heart attack recently and is struggling back. While she isn’t blogging as regularly as before, she does explain why. In addition, her children have also helped everyone keep up with news. This is an excellent although unplanned use of a web log.

Today she posted a list of items from the expert’s perspective (recipient) that we all too often forget or wished we knew when a friend or family is in care.

Amenities:
If you know anyone staying for a while in a hospital or extended care facility, among the things that will make life good for them, are: […]

I would add a flannel shirt or some other easy to use coverup. Add your suggestions to Maya’s Granny or below.


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IHS 2008 Long Term Care Grants

Subject: IHS 2008 Long Term Care Grants announcement
To: ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV
The 2008 Long Term Care Grants request for application has been published in the Federal Register. These are grants for $50,000 – 75,000 per year for two years to either plan or implement long term care services.
Key Dates May 2 for mandatory Letter of Intent.

The Letter of Intent does not obligate you to apply, but we cannot accept applications unless there has been a letter of intent to apply. So if you think you might apply, send in a letter of intent!

June 20 application deadline
A pdf of the Federal Register Announcement can be found at: http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2008/pdf/E8-6409.pdf

The application has not yet been posted but will be on www.Grants.gov using Funding Announcement Number: HHS–2008–IHS–EHC–0001 or CDFA number:93.933.

Bruce Finke, MD
IHS / Nashville Area Elder Health Consultant
Chronic Care Initiative
(413) 584-0790
(615) 417-4915 cell
http://www.ihs.gov/MedicalPrograms/ElderCare/index.asp

The AI/AN elder population is growing rapidly and the Al/AN population as a whole is aging. The prevalence of chronic disease in this population continues to increase, contributing to a frail elder population with increasing long-term care (LTC) needs.

LTC is best understood as an array of social and health care services that support an individual who has needs for assistance in activities of daily living over a prolonged period. LTC supports elders and their families with medical, personal, and social services delivered in a variety of settings to support quality of life, maximum function, and dignity.

While families continue to be the backbone of LTC for Al/AN elders, there is well documented need to support this care with formal services. The way these services and systems of care are developed and implemented can have a profound impact on the cultural and spiritual health of the community.

Home and community-based services have the potential for meeting the needs of the vast majority of elders requiring LTC services, supporting the key roles of the family in the care of the elder and the elder in the care of the family and community.


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