Search Results for 'Yup'ik'



Mary Ann Sundown

Ms Sundown is almost a nonagenarian. More importantly, as a highly accomplished dancer and creator she has certainly brought a liveliness and attention to modern traditional dance in our region. [see previous post on Eskimo dancing

Yupik’ elder Mary Ann Sundown, 87, of Scammon Bay made a quest appearance with Upallret Dancers from Bethel during Quyana Alaska presented by the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention at the Egan Center on Wednesday, October 25, 2006

Read the entire story at

Mary Ann Sundown

2008-04-06
Ms Sundown danced at Cama’i this year.

Related post:
mary-ann-sundown-on-youtube


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Ethnic stereotyping and ageism

The post office box this week held an issue of the New Yorker which generated mixed feelings. Many New Yorker cartoons (http://www.cartoonbank.com/) are funny because they skewer our fallacies and foibles using the stereotypes we all have about each other. Most of the stereotypes protrayed are of rich white folk.

This recent cartoon is funny because it reveals the biased attitude many employers have towards older workers. Unfortunately, the medium of expressing a worthy idea is based upon an ethnic stereotype which is problematic, at the best.


by Lee Lorenz

Hold it—we almost forgot his benefits package.” (Two eskimos sending a third out to sea on a small slab of ice.)

ID: 122851, Published in The New Yorker September 11, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/fzgsq

The stereotype underlying the cartoon’s point about ageism is false. Recently we had a physician lie about just such a scenario, up north. People were quite hurt by the accusation.

JAMA falls foul of fabricated suicide story [JAMA is Journal of the American Medical Association]

by Deborah Josefson, San Francisco

An essay published in JAMA’s Piece of my Mind section, has stirred controversy after it was revealed that the events depicted in it were fictional.

The essay was written by a medical student, Shetal Shah, and appeared last October (JAMA 2000;284:1897-8). In his essay, Mr Shah described an encounter with a 97 year old Inuit [sic. Eskimo people live in Alaska and Inuit people live in Canada.] man, a toothless elderly member of the Siberian Yupik tribe, who, feeling useless, came to say goodbye to the young medical student before committing suicide by walking off into a frozen tundra in the morning fog.

In a letter to JAMA, Dr Michael Swenson, a physician with Norton Health Sound in Nome, Alaska, and Shah’s tutor during his elective, denied the existence of such a patient. Moreover, Dr Swenson charged that Mr Shah’s false account promulgates false stereotypes about the Inuit people and perpetuates ancient myths…. Dr Swenson said that he understood Mr Shah’s tweaking of events to make them more of a story but said that the account was entirely fictional and as such reflected more of our culture’s prejudices towards elderly people than those of the Siberian Yupik….

Read the story in the British Medical Journal, on-line here

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/323/7311/472/a

I’m not sure there is any evidence for any such a scenario in the past, except maybe under extreme conditions of long ago.

Certainly, such a slur against a large group of US citizens should not have been printed in the New Yorker. As the response to the BMJ article said,

When will medical journals learn to leave anecdotes for Cosmopolitan and fictionalized accounts for the New Yorker? The author’s explanatory note is lame in the extreme. BMJ 2001;323:472 ( 1 September )

On the other hand, I am not as troubled by Sam Gross’ cartoon at the bottom, in part because he skewers every stereotype and in part because it highlights so well the predominant establishment attitude around here about caring and valuing older people.

This is 2006. We have no nursing home; we had an assisted living residence, which was never used as such. Another assisted living residence was promised to open September 2005. After several people inquired publicly, the health corp. finally announced it might open in 2008.

July 15, 2006, Assisted living home construction could begin soon

Construction on an Assisted Living Home in the YK Delta for elders and adults with disabilities may be just beyond the horizon.

“Establishing an assisted living home is important because we have an aging population in our region and we don’t have a facility where we can take care of them properly,” said Gene Peltola, CEO of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation.

Despite the fact that the elderly make up one of the fastest growing populations in the YK Delta, the region remains as the only area in Alaska that has no long-term assisted living facility.

http://www.ykhc.org/1253.cfm

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by Danny Shanahan

“Remember, son, it’s never too early to start saving for retirement.” (Father talking to son as he pushes an elderly Eskimo out to sea on an ice floe.)

ID: 46757, Published in The New Yorker November 26, 2001, http://tinyurl.com/gqwvu

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by Christopher Weyant

“It’s your mother. She’s floated back.” (Two eskimos watch a third float back on his ice floe.)

ID: 122883, Published in The New Yorker September 18, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/znx2s

I have never appreciated mother-in-law jokes as they are inherently misogynist. The above is next week’s New Yorker take on Eskimos.

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by Sam Gross

“Are you sure this ice floe is going to pass by the nursing home?” (Elderly Eskimo on ice floe shouts back to family who are waving good-bye.)

ID: 42864, Published in The New Yorker November 22, 1999, http://tinyurl.com/j6soq

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Ann Fienup-Riordan, Ph.D. has explored Alaska Eskimo stereotypes and other portrayals in the movies—
Freeze Frame book jacket

http://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/FIEFRP.html

“Freeze Frame, Alaska Eskimos in the Movies” by Ann Fienup-Riordan, Pub Date: August 2003,
ISBN:Paper: 0-295-98337-X


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NIH Hot Weather Advice for Older People

NB — Alcohol and heat can kill, whether weather-related heat or from spas, hot tubs, or steam / maqaq (steambaths or saunas).

From: NIH news releases and news items On Behalf Of NIH OLIB (NIH/OD)
Subject: KEEP IT COOL WITH HOT WEATHER ADVICE FOR OLDER PEOPLE

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News National Institute on Aging (NIA)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, July 24, 2006

CONTACT: Anne Decker, 301-496-1752, nianews AT mailDOTnih.gov

Older people are at high risk for developing heated-related illness because the ability to respond to summer heat can become less efficient with advancing years. Fortunately, the summer can remain safe and enjoyable for everyone who uses good, sound judgment.

Heat stress, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat, heat cramps and heat exhaustion are all forms of “hyperthermia,” the general name given to a variety of heat-related illnesses. Symptoms may include headache, nausea, muscle spasms and fatigue after exposure to heat. If you suspect someone is suffering from a heat-related illness:
Continue reading ‘NIH Hot Weather Advice for Older People’

When you visit the senior center

Senior centers have provided services under the Older Americans Act since 1965. One of the objectives of the OAA is Freedom, independence, and the free exercise of individual initiative…..and protection against abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

Not all Alaska communities are fortunate enough to have a senior center. Nevertheless, small places are able to contract with their local restaurants or a van owner to provide basic services.

Bethel has a senior center and nearly $1 million dollars a year is spent on the program. About 300 of us are old enough to be eligible to use the senior center, although fewer than 10% or so are regulars.

When next you go (if you can’t go in person, go virtually here), try these ideas—Because, not everyone has had a chance to use a wheelchair or a walker, or hasn’t pushed their grandbabies stroller, or hasn’t had a bad cataract surgery—

  • Before leaving your vehicle or taxi, take off your shoes and socks. Enter the senior center (do not use any stairs).
  • Inside, unless you have just been to the eye doctor, wear your darkest glasses or double-up sunglasses, or borrow someone’s “coke-bottle” glasses. Or, perhaps, smear a light coating of Vaseline or motor oil on your glasses. Quickly walk from the lunch room through to the other room and back again (yes, you are still barefoot).
  • Try to read a book while sitting in front of the reception desk or in the seats away from the windows.
  • Go up to the open loft area where the day program for the most frail occurs. Grab a pillow with one hand. Put the other hand behind your back or in your waistband. Quick! you have fewer than 90 seconds to get 150 feet away from the building (remember, no stairs, no elevator, no shoes). How many cars were parked in front of the bottom exit? (Grate Sidewalks (Bad gate)
  • Go to the toilet—While balancing on only one leg, sit on one of the commodes. Stand up.
  • Pretend you are Goldilocks—sit back in each of the chairs and sofas. Place your hands on your shoulders (hug yourself tightly). Now stand up.

Matt Erin sit-to-stand Image from Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute

  • Do you remember building a sled or repairing a boat in the workshop? Try to take it back in to the renovated shop. While you are there, point to the fire alarm or emergency telephone. Be sure to wash your hands of chemicals before returning to the main building.
  • Back inside the main room, lie on the floor and look up. How long have those clerestory windows been boarded over? When was that piece of cardboard tacked on the ceiling to cover where the heating stove was?
  • I don’t know how one can mimic hearing difficulties. I do know that people have said that even with the loud speakers it is very difficult to make out the Yup’ik or Cup’ik or English used in meetings.

Ask the Senior Director to see—

  • the last 5 logs of the regular fire drills
  • the certificate of national accreditation for senior centers (National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC), a unit of the National Council on the Aging, Inc. (NCOA)
  • minutes of the Senior Advisory Board for the past 5 years
  • staff roster


The following are suggested to bring with you when visiting adult day centers (from the National Adult Day Services Association, Inc., http://www.nadsa.org)

Adult Day Centers provide a planned program that includes a variety of health, social and support services in a protective setting during daytime hours. This is a community-based service designed to meet the individual needs of functionally and/or cognitively impaired adults.

The following list will help you decide which day center is the right one for you.

http://www.nadsa.org/quality_providers/default.asp#s5

SITE VISIT CHECKLIST (retrieved 2005)
Yes / No Did you feel welcomed?
Yes / No Did someone spend time finding out what you want and need?
Yes / No Did someone clearly explain what services and activities the center provides?
Yes / No Did they present information about staffing, program procedures, costs and what they expect of caregivers?
Yes / No Was the facility clean, pleasant and free of odor?
Yes / No Were the building and the rooms wheelchair accessible?
Yes / No Was there sturdy, comfortable furniture?
Yes / No Loungers for relaxation? Chairs with arms?
Yes / No Is there a quiet place for conferences?
Yes / No Is there a place to isolate sick persons?
Yes / No Did you see cheerful faces on staff and participants?
Yes / No Do volunteers help?
Yes / No Are participants involved in planning activities or making other suggestions?
=====================================================

And don’t be a such a stranger; it’s your center.


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