Search Results for 'NIH'



Grants: Developmental Research on Elder Mistreatment

This could be especially useful for small communities. Some of our neglect and mistreatment can be spotted, if not understood why (Neglect of Bethel Elders again, Senior Center staff defends care of elders, Letter to the Editor On Neglecting Seniors, ). But we have other instances which are not seen, not recognized Elder Abuse and Neglect Assessment, or even generally recognized as acceptable (and therefore not recognized as mistreatment). We tend to think of mistreatment as only an institutional problem, but if a community is too small to have institutional awareness, what then?

Department of Health and Human Services announces funds to initiate the systematic scientific study of Elder Mistreatment in community and institutional settings. The research priority areas include: (1) innovative methods for estimating incidence; (2) standardization of definitions and measurement; (3) elaboration of risk factors; (4) methods of survey, clinical, and psychosocial identification of Elder Mistreatment; and (5) identification of Elder Mistreatment in institutional settings. Eligible applicants include city or township governments, county governments, independent school districts, public and state controlled institutions of higher education, state governments, nonprofits, faith-based organizations, private institutions of higher education, and for-profit organizations. The deadline for applications is October 25, 2006. Approximately $1,100,000 is available to fund awards up to $200,000. For further information, contact NIH OER Webmaster at FBOWebmaster AT OD DOT NIH.GOV; or go to:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-06-009.html

Info courtesy of http://library.med.utah.edu/blogs/BHIC/archives/cat_scholarships_and_grants.html#001735


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Conversando con su médico—Free Publication to Improve Doctor/Patient Communication

May 18, 2006
Free Publication Helps Older Hispanics Improve Doctor/Patient Communication

How well patients and doctors talk to each other is one of the most important parts of getting good health care. As we get older, it becomes even more important to talk often and comfortably with the doctor. Unfortunately, talking to the doctor isn’t always easy. It takes time and effort. A new publication from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) can help older adults learn to communicate more effectively with their doctors.

Conversando con su médico is a 38-page Spanish-language publication. To order a free copy, please call the NIA Information Center toll free at 1-800-222-2225 Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

# Choosing a doctor,
# Communicating effectively with the doctor and other health care providers,
# Working with an interpreter,
# Discussing sensitive issues such as incontinence or sexuality, and
# Finding additional health information in Spanish.

NIA Web site at http://www.nia.nih.gov

http://medlib.med.utah.edu/blogs/BHIC/ archives/cat_minority_health_concerns.html#001560

The BHIC blog tracks all sorts of interesting stuff, and it is available by RSS feed.
http://medlib.med.utah.edu/blogs/BHIC/
Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC) By Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, Community Outreach Liaison, MidContinental Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine

Dramatic Changes in U.S. Aging


By Sara Miller Llana
| Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

Census 2006 report: rising well-being
Dramatic Changes in U.S. Aging Highlighted in New Census, NIH Report
Impact of Baby Boomers Anticipated

….Seniors like Dr. Palmore are helping redefine notions of “getting older.” Forgotten by the media, passed over for promotions, and teased by birthday cards, they have long struggled for dignity in a youth-obsessed society.

But increasingly active and independent seniors, and the baby boomers who will follow, are helping to chip away at the ageism that spans Hollywood to Hallmark. Seniors today are healthier, wealthier, and more educated than their predecessors – and their population will double in the next 25 years.

Those are the highlights from a US Census Bureau report released Thursday on Americans 65 and older….

Some experts worry that the affluence of baby boomers is being overstated, hiding distressing situations for subgroups, especially at a time of soaring healthcare costs. While only 8 percent of older whites lived in poverty in 2003, 20 percent of blacks and 24 percent of Hispanics did, according to the new Census report….

Older people who lived alone faced the highest poverty rates. In 2003, among older women living alone, poverty rates were 17 percent for white women and 40 percent for black and Hispanic women.

And even as standards of living improve, few expect old perceptions to dissolve quickly.

Stereotypes remain rampant in the media, says Todd Nelson, a psychology professor specializing in aging at California State University, Stanislaus….

census.gov Press-Release

The face of aging in the United States is changing dramatically — and rapidly, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau. Today’s older Americans are very different from their predecessors, living longer, having lower rates of disability, achieving higher levels of education and less often living in poverty. And the baby boomers, the first of whom celebrated their 60th birthdays in 2006, promise to redefine further what it means to grow older in America.

“The social and economic implications of an aging population — and of the baby boom in particular — are likely to be profound for both individuals and society,” says Census Bureau Director Louis Kincannon.

The report, 65+ in the United States: 2005 [PDF], was commissioned by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), a component of the National Institutes of Health, to provide a picture of the health and socioeconomic status of the aging population. It highlights striking shifts in aging on a population scale and also describes changes at the local and even family level, examining, for example, changes in family structure as a result of divorce.”


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Publications List from National Institute on Aging

You can get a list of all their stuff just by leaving the search box empty, too. Visit here http://www.nia.nih.gov/data/pubsearch.asp

When you visit the senior center

Senior centers have provided services under the Older Americans Act since 1965. One of the objectives of the OAA is Freedom, independence, and the free exercise of individual initiative…..and protection against abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

Not all Alaska communities are fortunate enough to have a senior center. Nevertheless, small places are able to contract with their local restaurants or a van owner to provide basic services.

Bethel has a senior center and nearly $1 million dollars a year is spent on the program. About 300 of us are old enough to be eligible to use the senior center, although fewer than 10% or so are regulars.

When next you go (if you can’t go in person, go virtually here), try these ideas—Because, not everyone has had a chance to use a wheelchair or a walker, or hasn’t pushed their grandbabies stroller, or hasn’t had a bad cataract surgery—

  • Before leaving your vehicle or taxi, take off your shoes and socks. Enter the senior center (do not use any stairs).
  • Inside, unless you have just been to the eye doctor, wear your darkest glasses or double-up sunglasses, or borrow someone’s “coke-bottle” glasses. Or, perhaps, smear a light coating of Vaseline or motor oil on your glasses. Quickly walk from the lunch room through to the other room and back again (yes, you are still barefoot).
  • Try to read a book while sitting in front of the reception desk or in the seats away from the windows.
  • Go up to the open loft area where the day program for the most frail occurs. Grab a pillow with one hand. Put the other hand behind your back or in your waistband. Quick! you have fewer than 90 seconds to get 150 feet away from the building (remember, no stairs, no elevator, no shoes). How many cars were parked in front of the bottom exit? (Grate Sidewalks (Bad gate)
  • Go to the toilet—While balancing on only one leg, sit on one of the commodes. Stand up.
  • Pretend you are Goldilocks—sit back in each of the chairs and sofas. Place your hands on your shoulders (hug yourself tightly). Now stand up.

Matt Erin sit-to-stand Image from Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute

  • Do you remember building a sled or repairing a boat in the workshop? Try to take it back in to the renovated shop. While you are there, point to the fire alarm or emergency telephone. Be sure to wash your hands of chemicals before returning to the main building.
  • Back inside the main room, lie on the floor and look up. How long have those clerestory windows been boarded over? When was that piece of cardboard tacked on the ceiling to cover where the heating stove was?
  • I don’t know how one can mimic hearing difficulties. I do know that people have said that even with the loud speakers it is very difficult to make out the Yup’ik or Cup’ik or English used in meetings.

Ask the Senior Director to see—

  • the last 5 logs of the regular fire drills
  • the certificate of national accreditation for senior centers (National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC), a unit of the National Council on the Aging, Inc. (NCOA)
  • minutes of the Senior Advisory Board for the past 5 years
  • staff roster


The following are suggested to bring with you when visiting adult day centers (from the National Adult Day Services Association, Inc., http://www.nadsa.org)

Adult Day Centers provide a planned program that includes a variety of health, social and support services in a protective setting during daytime hours. This is a community-based service designed to meet the individual needs of functionally and/or cognitively impaired adults.

The following list will help you decide which day center is the right one for you.

http://www.nadsa.org/quality_providers/default.asp#s5

SITE VISIT CHECKLIST (retrieved 2005)
Yes / No Did you feel welcomed?
Yes / No Did someone spend time finding out what you want and need?
Yes / No Did someone clearly explain what services and activities the center provides?
Yes / No Did they present information about staffing, program procedures, costs and what they expect of caregivers?
Yes / No Was the facility clean, pleasant and free of odor?
Yes / No Were the building and the rooms wheelchair accessible?
Yes / No Was there sturdy, comfortable furniture?
Yes / No Loungers for relaxation? Chairs with arms?
Yes / No Is there a quiet place for conferences?
Yes / No Is there a place to isolate sick persons?
Yes / No Did you see cheerful faces on staff and participants?
Yes / No Do volunteers help?
Yes / No Are participants involved in planning activities or making other suggestions?
=====================================================

And don’t be a such a stranger; it’s your center.


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