Archive for the 'retirement' Category



Senior softball champion is an enigma even to his teammates

from Boing Boing

Friday, November 18, 2005
Senior softball champion is an enigma even to his teammates
Sixty-four-year-old John Meeden is regarded as the best player out of the two million aging baby boomers who belong to "senior softball" leagues, but nobody knows much about him, even his teammates. J.R. Moehringer of the LA Times traveled to St. Louis to see if he could find out more about the mysterious Meeden. It’s a wonderfully-written piece.

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How much money does a centenarian need for retirement?

October 31, 2005 edition, By Steve Dinnen
http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/1031/p15s01-wmgn.html?s=hns

Q: How much should one have saved when it becomes mandatory to start taking money out of an IRA? What would be a reasonable amount for a comfortable retirement which would include a cruise once a year and account for taxes, home insurance, a car, gasoline, food, and inflation? Would $1 million cover all that? All my relatives are over 100 years old and I need to think in the long term. And staying independent is important.
V.C., Missouri

A: A million dollars might sound like a nice, round – and precise – figure. But before determining how much you need to have saved, Tony Proctor, a certified financial planner from Wellesley, Mass., says that you must calculate how much you plan to spend each year. And you must calculate all of your sources of retirement income, such as Social Security and pensions.

Someone who plans to spend $150,000 per year in retirement, and who only has Social Security to offset their spending, will need much more than $1 million in the bank, Mr. Proctor says. But that amount would be a fortune to someone who only spends $40,000 per year and has Social Security income of $20,000 per year.

The key to determining a reasonable amount to have saved is knowing your "annual cash flow need," he says. Proctor defines that as the difference between your spending and your sources of income.

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/bmj.38586.448704.E0v1?ecoll
BMJ, doi:10.1136/bmj.38586.448704.E0 (published 21 October 3005)

[But, why did early retirees retire early? feeling unwell?]

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population: prospective cohort study
Shan P Tsai 1*, Judy K Wendt 1, Robin P Donnelly 1, Geert de Jong 2, Farah S Ahmed 1

1 Shell Health Services, Shell Oil Company, 910 Louisiana, Houston, TX 77002, USA
2 Shell International, Hague, Netherlands
* Correspondence to: shan.tsaiAT shell DOT com

Objective To assess whether early retirement is associated with better survival.
Design Long term prospective cohort study.
Setting Petroleum and petrochemical industry, United States.
Subjects Past employees of Shell Oil who retired at ages 55, 60, and 65 between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 2003.
Main outcome measure Hazard ratio of death adjusted for sex, year of entry to study, and socioeconomic status.

Results Subjects who retired early at 55 and who were still alive at 65 had a significantly higher mortality than those who retired at 65 (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.73). Mortality was also significantly higher for subjects in the first 10 years after retirement at 55 compared with those who continued working (1.89, 1.58 to 2.27). After adjustment, mortality was similar between those who retired at 60 and those who retired at 65 (1.06, 0.92 to 1.22). Mortality did not differ for the first five years after retirement at 60 compared with continuing work at 60 (1.04, 0.82 to 1.31).

Conclusions Retiring early at 55 or 60 was not associated with better survival than retiring at 65 in a cohort of past employees of the petrochemical industry. Mortality was higher in employees who retired at 55 than in those who continued working.

(Accepted 16 August 2005)

Living on cruise ships is cost effective for elderly people

BMJ 2004;329:1065 (6 November), doi:10.1136/bmj.329.7474.1065-b

Janice Hopkins Tanne New York

Living on a cruise ship provides a better quality of life and is cost effective for elderly people who need help to live independently, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society ( 2004;52: 1-4)[CrossRef][ISI][Medline].

…. says Lee Lindquist, instructor of medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, and a geriatrician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. People older than 65 who enjoy travel, have good cognitive function, but need some help in daily living are ideal candidates for care on a cruise ship.

The typical resident in a US assisted living facility is an 80 year old (age range 66 to 94) widowed, white, ambulatory woman who needs help with about two activities of daily living, such as walking, bathing, toileting, feeding, dressing, and transfers (for example, from bed to chair).

Such people might do better on a cruise ship, at a similar cost, even for many years.
….
In the United States, an assisted living facility costs about $2360 (&#A3;1290; {euro}1850) a month or $28 689 a year. In the northeast and the west of the United States, costs are higher.

A one month cruise in November in the Caribbean would cost $2651. Living on board for the entire year would cost $33 260. The authors calculate that the long term cost for a person to live on a cruise ship from the age of 80 until his or her death would be $230 497 compared with $228 075 for an assisted living facility.


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Rolling Stones tour (biologically, the young olds)



Read here
The Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger at Fenway Park in Boston
The combined age of the four band members is 245 – but they proved they have no intention of slowing down.

eyes wide apart: Illustration Friday: AGING

Go view the illustration and have fun. (Another greybeard off his rocker.)

Instead of waxing on and on about aches, wrinkles and those snarky greys…I kept thinking of the song ‘Young-at-Heart’ by ol’ Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra. Great song. Wonderful song. So, then I started thinking about little kids…and this image came to mind. One of those seldom times where the idea AND the execution came together nice and quick. Which is great, considering my age and all!! 😉


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

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