Search Results for 'tribal government'

veterans tribal cemetery bill

This will be great news. The cemeteries won’t be huge national cemeteries. But now the developing or improvement of veterans’ gravesites can be supported. Let’s hope the law also applies to tribal governments in Alaska (all but one do not have lands under their jurisdiction, i.e., are not “Indian country”)

A bill that would enable American Indian veterans to be buried on their tribal lands passed Congress on Saturday and awaits President Bush’s signature to become law.

The Native American Veterans Cemetery Act, a bill sponsored by U.S. Rep. Tom Udall, D-N.M., allows tribes to apply for grants to establish, expand or improve tribal veterans’ cemeteries on trust land. Currently, tribal governments are not eligible for money from the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the bill would put tribes on the same level as states.

December 12, 2006

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Reverend David Salmon, Athabascan nonagenarian

The first link to the audio story is quite good. Father Salmon and Peter John (another nonagenarian) were extraordinarily accomplished.
Rev. David Salmon

Flags are at half-staff across Alaska today, following the death of an Athabascan elder and leader. The Reverend David Salmon died yesterday. He was the first traditional chief for the Tanana Chief’s region, and the first Athabascan ordained to the Episcopal ministry.
Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks
http://aprn.org/2007/10/12/alaska-remembers-tanana-elder-david-salmon/

  • The 95-year-old cherished Gwich’in elder has been first traditional chief since August 2003, following the passing of Chief Peter John of Minto. The position is … held in high esteem.

  • Last Modified: October 12, 2007 at 02:43 PM
    Athabascan traditional chief Salmon dies at 95

    FAIRBANKS — The first traditional chief for the Athabascan people of the Interior died Thursday at his home in Chalkyitsik. The Rev. David Salmon was 95. “He was sitting in his favorite chair when he passed,” Salmon’s granddaughter, Patricia Salmon”

    http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/story/9374481p-9287881c.html

    Father Salmon’s biography is here, from the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments,

  • http://www.catg.org/gallery/elders/DavidSalmon.html
  • and another one is here, Tanana Chiefs Conference–

  • Chief Salmon, who was first made Chief of Chalkyitsik at the age of 29, helped shape the community and was instrumental in building a school and starting a store. He introduced the first Christmas tree and potlatch, and built the church by hauling 90 logs at the age of 70, using only a chainsaw.
  • Chief David Salmon – “My father saved my life”
  • He received an honorary degree from the University of Alaska.

    “Athabascan elder Rev. David Salmon, traditional chief of Chalkyitsik and second chief of Interior Alaska villages with the Tanana Chiefs Conference, just celebrated his 90th birthday, was the first Gwich’in to be ordained as a priest in the Episcopal Church where he served for more than 42 years.

    Salmon has had a life-long interest in education and sharing his cultural knowledge with others through programs such as UAF’s Elder in Residence program and the Academy of Elders, an intense immersion program for certified teachers intent on developing K-12 curriculum and teacher training programs. Salmon has collaborated extensively with UAF’s anthropology department and has been a Geist lecturer at the University of Alaska Museum for the past five summers. Salmon is considered a master toolmaker and his tools, fish traps and canoes are on display at the museum and in other university buildings. Salmon is a founding member of Denakkanaaga nonprofit elders’ organization. In January, the David Salmon Tribal Hall was opened in Fairbanks and dedicated by TCC in recognition of a lifetime of service. Salmon will receive an Honorary Doctor of Laws.”
    http://www.uaf.edu/commencement/2002/hdr.html

    Chief David Salmon 2006
    Chief David Salmon Traditional Athabascan Tool Collection, a new art acquisition purchased jointly by Doyon, Limited and the Doyon Foundation.

    “I knew that if I didn’t make the tools, that they would just stay back there to be forgotten… How can the young people learn without seeing the tool? The Athabascan way is to teach by showing you; then when you see, you will learn. That is why when I speak about a tool, it must be in my hand. That is how it always was; that is how it should be.” — Chief David Salmon

    … in the summer of 1994, Chief David Salmon began to craft a collection of tools, illustrating the pre- and early post-contact technology of theAthabascans of Alaska’s Interior. Most of these tools were used in the Athabascans’ subsistence lifestyle into the 1920s.

    http://www.doyon.com/pdfs/news_august04.pdf

    Both Chief Salmon and Chief Peter John spoke widely about their religious faith.
    “The history of this country is not known,” Salmon explains his reasons for doing that book, plus another on the oral history of his people. “Young people do not know it. Old people die with it. Well, I don’t want to die with it. I want the young people to have it.”O’Brien, Thomas A. 1997. Athabaskan implements from the skin house days as related by Reverend David Salmon. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1997. OCLC: 42066842

    The Gospel according to Peter John
    # Publisher: Alaska Native Knowledge Network (1996)
    # Language: English
    # ASIN: B000BSFGQY

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    Neglect of Bethel Elders again

    October 2005

    We’ve just had the third instance (at least) of an elder denied senior services (transportation) because of neglect. Adult Protective Services has been contacted each time. Cold weather is here and the elder is unable to walk home. The only two cabbies who would have conveyed him can no longer accept him (they are usually not near the senior center when the call comes in and the elder must remain outdoors waiting.) The situation is known to the senior director, who has in the past refused to speak to the cabbies reporting the neglect. The local paper Tundra Drums refused to assist in this latest instance when the cabbie went to them for information.

    Aside from APS, where do people go to change the situation? Individuals on the Senior Advisory Board have been attacked by senior services personnel when bringing the issues to public attention (even at a City Council meeting.)

    This is why older people must be active in their own lives. These are your services. When the senior services program itself denies services to elders, it is up to the rest of us to protest. We just need ideas to overcome the local news media reluctance to act; the City of Bethel’s refusal to act; and the ONC tribal government’s inaction.

    [It should also be noted that the neglect was also reported to the regional health corp. with trust responsibility, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. (YKHC), which runs the personal care program. YKHC was supposed to have an assisted living home opened last month, too, but which doesn’t even have a footprint staked out.]


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    Grants: Family Caregivers

    Weinberg Foundation Announces Grant Program to Support Family Caregivers

    Deadline: June 12, 2008

    The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation
    ( http://www.hjweinbergfoundation.org/ ) has announced an innovative new program to provide $9 million in grants to assist caregivers across the United States.

    The Family and Informal Caregiver Funding Program was developed by the Weinberg Foundation to provide the critical resources necessary to support caregivers in innovative ways and facilitate partnerships among agencies and organizations. The primary goal of the program is to increase support for family and informal caregivers who assist older adults living in the community.

    Eligible grant recipients include nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations; faith- and other community-based organizations; tribal organizations; and units of local government nationwide.

    The grant program will support from twelve to twenty community- based projects with grants ranging from $100,000 to $300,000 each (for a total of $300,000 to $900,000 for each grant recipient from March 2009 through February 2012).

    Complete application details and additional information are available at the foundation’s Web site or by contacting the foundation’s offices.

    Contact Information:
    Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation
    Tel: (410) 654-8500
    Email: CaregivingRFP at theweinbergfoundation dot org

    RFP Link:
    http://fconline.foundationcenter.org/pnd/15012257/weinberg

    For additional RFPs in Aging, visit:
    http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/rfp/cat_aging.jhtml


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    Funding, grants available 2007 2008

    Brookdale Foundation: Relatives as Parents Program

    This program is designed to encourage and promote the creation or expansion of services for grandparents and other relatives who have taken on the responsibility of surrogate parenting due to the absence of the parents. The program awards seed grants of $10,000 over a two-year period in two categories: local agencies and state public agencies. Deadlines Local proposals are due January 10, 2008 and State proposals are due by February 8, 2008. For more information see http://www.epa.gov/aging/index.htm#2007_0110_grant_1

    National Center on Senior Transportation: Requests for Proposals for Demonstration Grants Deadline December 17, 2007

    The National Center on Senior Transportation is soliciting proposals from aging/human service agencies, tribal organizations, faith-based organizations, units of state and local government, public and private transportation providers and other entities interested in developing and implementing innovative approaches to increasing senior transportation options and improving older adult mobility. Successful projects will be collaborative, replicable, and consistent with senior transportation-related goals of the national United We Ride initiative of the Federal Transit Administration. The goals are to: 1.Increase transportation options for older adults; 2. Simplify older adults’ access to transportation services; and 3. Increase the quality of transportation services for older adults. Successful applicants will receive grant awards ranging from $50,000 – $90,000. For more information see http://www.seniortransportation.net

    Proposals are due Deadline Monday, Dec. 17, 2007, and should be submitted electronically via email to twilson AT n4a DOT org or using the online form which can be reached through the center’s Web site ( http://www.seniortransportation.net). Electronic or online submission is preferred but hard copies will be accepted. Hard copies of the proposal must be received on or before Dec. 17, 2007. The mailing address is Tabitha Wilson, Assistant Director, NCST, 1730 Rhode Island Ave., NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20036


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