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Senior Services Transportation

senior bus steps 0

The photo is of Bethel’s senior bus. The bus makes rounds on a set schedule, but the schedule is infrequently posted on the bulletin board. The first step is at the level of the person’s knees. Note also the narrow doorway, the grab bars are inside, and the lack of assistance.

…Santa Fe Ride provides around-the-clock, curb-to-curb transportation for residents with disabilities and eligible seniors. It logs 150 to 200 trips a day, Granillo said.

Changes will include a telephone-reservation system and a service that lets customers schedule recurring trips up to two weeks in advance. Also, for the first time, city employees will drive customers between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Previously, the city contracted with Capital City Cab to transport all its clients to grocery stores, the doctor, friends’ houses and elsewhere in the city. The cab service still will transport Santa Fe Ride customers on weekends and from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. Monday through Friday. …

One-way trips for riders holding an Americans With Disabilities Act card — issued by the city transit division — will still cost $2. Seniors with a “ride card” will continue to pay $5 per one-way trip. “I don’t see Santa Fe Ride fares going up,” Granillo said. The city has nine vans for the program, eight of them with raised roofs and mechanical lifts to accommodate wheelchair-bound customers, she said. The ninth vehicle is a minivan equipped with a ramp but not a mechanical lift. In some cases, Granillo said, seniors prefer the minivan because it is lower to the ground and easier to climb into and out of. If the minivans prove durable enough, the city might buy more, Granillo said….

http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/45473.html

Alaska FY2006 Nutrition Transportation and Support Services Awards

Anchorage region
ANCHORAGE CENTER INC.
$37,434

CHUGIAK SENIOR CITIZENS INC.
$133,268

MUNICIPALITY OF ANCHORAGE
$545,000

THE SALVATION ARMY
$772,163

VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA/ALASKA
$50,000

Interior
FAIRBANKS NATIVE ASSOC.
$34,265

NENANA TORTELLA COUNCIL ON AGING
$83,956

NORTH STAR COUNCIL ON AGING
$149,227

TANANA TRIBAL COUNCIL
$40,000

UPPER TANANA DEVELOPMENT CORP.
$301,822

NATIVE VILLAGE OF FORT YUKON
$33,000

MINTO VILLAGE COUNCIL
$40,000

North Slope
NORTH SLOPE BOROUGH
$140,000

NW region
MANIILAQ
$31,246

NOME COMMUNITY CENTER
$210,000

South Central
CORDOVA COMMUNITY MEDICAL CENTER
$57,600

HOMER SENIOR CITIZEN
$123,000

KENAI, CITY OF
$104,969

MID-VALLEY SENIORS, INC.
$50,000

NIKISKI SENIOR CITIZENS, INC.
$15,000

PALMER SENIOR CITIZENS
$161,000

SELDOVIA VILLAGE TRIBE
$27,833

SENIOR CITIZENS OF KODIAK INC.
$185,000

SEWARD SENIOR CITIZENS INC.
$38,940

SOLDOTNA AREA SENIOR CITIZENS INC.
$45,000

VALDEZ SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER INC.
$31,563

STERLING AREA SR. CIITZENS
$13,599

WASILLA AREA SENIORS
$137,633

CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICE
$923,068

SE
METLAKATLA INDIAN ASSOCIATION
$54,508

MT. VIEW FOOD SERVICES INC.
$22,815

ALASKA COMMUNITY SERVICES
$97,538

STW (?)
ALASKA LEGAL SVC CORP.
$132,159

OLDER PERSONS ACTION GROUP
$103,000

ALEKNAGIK, CITY OF
$6,597

SW
BRISTOL BAY NATIVE ASSOC.
$176,613

DILLINGHAM, CITY OF
$153,608

ORUTSARARMIUT NATIVE COUNCIL
$74,388

UNALASKA SENIOR CITIZENS
$23,620

KUSKOKWIM NATIVE ASSOCIATION
$26,797

LOWER KUSKOKWIM
$45,000

http://www.hss.state.ak.us/dsds/ntsforms/ntsawards.htm

Picturing Alaska history : USA territory to statehood

Turner Publishing (http://www.turnerpublishing.com) asked if I would consider reviewing a new book. I’m glad I agreed. Historic Photos of Alaska has just been published, a large format book of black and white photographs from the period 1867 to 1979. Dermot Cole, long-time columnist for the Fairbanks Daily Newsminer, provides the text and captions.

As a journalist, Dermot also has an interest in history (apart from his twin brother, Terrance, history professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks). Dermot Cole is the author of Amazing Pipeline Stories published by Epicenter Press in 1997, about the people and Fairbanks during the Alaska oil pipeline construction.

The perspective of Historic Photos of Alaska, is for those readers outside Alaska. That is, this is a pictorial history of Alaska as part of “America”. [Through no fault of this book, many in the US will still consider Alaska as a foreign body, along with New Mexico.]

The photos are arranged by time periods, from purchase to statehood– 1867-1905, 1906-1919, 1920-1940, and 1941-1979. These periods represent significant periods of US and Alaska relations. The orientation is a deliberate effort to stand apart from the usual Alaskana picture books. Another significant difference in this book is the choice of rarely seen photos and not the ubiquitous ones. The photos are reproduced with sufficient quality to review again and again and see something new each time.

Readers can follow themes such as regional changes (southeast Alaska also known as the Northwest Coast compared to Nome in northwest Alaska) and transportation. However, other themes can be chosen by readers according to personal interest.

    Dogs
    Most of the dogs are Alaska huskies (freight variety), such as ones on pages 44 and 55 and in harness, page 58. However, the team on page 67 is actually part of a Saami family (reindeer herders originally from Scandinavia. Note the hats and boot toes.) The harness setup is very different from that of the Eskimo family team on page 128. There are also sporting dogs (early 20th century conformation) such as the one on page 92 belonging to Jim Haly. Look carefully. The dog has just spotted another dog out of view, and kicked up a cloud of dust with his hind legs.

    Electric trees
    Even on the frozen tundra of Nome (page 111) and sprouting ever more branches over time in populated areas such as Cordova page 120 and Fairbanks page 151.

    Military
    One way to trace the influence of the military in Alaska is through men’s hats in the photos. Since Territorial days, the military has been a significant economic and development force in Alaska. Much of the early geological studies and geodetic surveys were military. World War II and then the Cold War continued the inflow of money and people. Photos from pages 168 to 180 show differing aspects of building the Al-Can or Alaska Highway and the later battles of Attu and the Aleutians. (see related posts here on the Al-Can and the Aleutians, https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/special-projects/photo-index-cking-wwii/)

    Miscellany
    Everywhere. The curiosity of Edwardian women’s fashion in open-air fish camp (useful against mosquitoes I suppose); the plank streets (for cars and horses) 400 miles from the nearest highway; even a Piggly-Wiggly store outside of the South.

Dermot Cole avoided the shop worn stash of Alaska photos. However, the next to last photo, page 197, is of the oil pipeline’s zigzagged engineering (to avoid temperature stresses) up the North Slope and over the Brooks Mountain Range. It’s a clever homage to the iconic Klondike gold rush photo of the future miners traipsing up the Chilkoot Pass.

I do have some quibbles with the book. There is an amazing variety of horses depicted but no photos of cows at Creamer’s Dairy in Fairbanks (I like the image of the wood stove chimney peeking out the milk truck to keep contents from freezing at 40 below).

More importantly, an outline map of Alaska is needed, with the places of photos identified.

The southwest of Alaska is mostly excluded. Considering that most folks in or outside Alaska believe everyone lives in an Eskimo igloo, it would also be helpful to include a map of languages/cultural regions in the state. Most readers will not be aware of the significance of the temporary, river going, hide boat depicted on page 44 built by the Athabascan Indian trapper to bring his skins to market. Compare with the more permanent skin boat built by Iñupiat Eskimo marine hunters on page 103. I already noted the Saami family.

The period of the first half of 1919 is missing although extremely important in the demography and history of non-urban Alaska. Upwards of 80% to 100% of people in some communities died during the pandemic of the “Spanish Flu”. The Jesse Lee Home (I ran across this recently published history) was one of several that cared for orphans left behind (those that survived long enough for help to reach them).

A suggested reading list would be nice, including Steven Langdon’s 1993. The Native People of Alaska. Anchorage, AK : Greatland Graphics. ISBN: 0936425172 9780936425177 OCLC: 27405205

A great companion volume would be John S. Whitehead’s 2004. Completing the Union: Alaska, Hawaii, and the Battle for Statehood. Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press. ISBN: 0826336361 9780826336361 082633637X 9780826336378, OCLC: 55665367

This book is not supposed to be a comprehensive pictorial history. Cole did an amazing job just to make a selection from all the possibilities and put together such an enjoyable book.


——————-
[Dermot Cole. 2008 Historic Photos of Alaska. Nashville: Turner Publishing Co.
# ISBN-10: 1596524243
# ISBN-13: 978-1596524248
# LoC 2007938665
Hardcover: 216 pages, Language: English, Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 10.1 x 1 inches, list price $39.95]


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Alaska day program first national center of excellence (not Bethel)

This is outstanding and goes along with our nationally certified senior center in Kodiak.

Salvation Army center lauded for dementia care program

The Salvation Army Serendipity Adult Day Center in Anchorage has received the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America award as an “Excellence in Care Dementia Program of Distinction.” The Salvation Army center is the first adult day care to receive the national honor. The center offers meaningful activities daily to about 30 adults with special needs, the foundation said. The award “validates what I feel is the culmination of years of hard work constantly trying to be on the cutting edge of new and innovative ideas in working with individuals who live with dementia and their families,” said Jesalyn Stanton, the center’s executive director. […]
Published: January 1st, 2008 http://www.adn.com/money/story/251697.html

Press release

NEW YORK, NY – The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) recently awarded its “Excellence in Care Dementia Program of Distinction” status to the nation’s first adult day center and three more assisted living facilities that have achieved AFA’s nationwide standard of excellence for facilities that provide care to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related illnesses. The Salvation Army Serendipity Adult Day Center, Anchorage, AK, is the first adult day center to receive the distinction. Also awarded Excellence in Care status are the memory care units within these facilities: Warwick Forest, Newport News, VA; The Catholic Care Center, Bel Aire, KS; and The Birches, Clarendon Hills, IL. […]

For more information about Excellence in Care, visit www.excellenceincare.org or call 866-AFA-8484.

In Bethel, we’ve made some progress. Those in the day program are no longer segregated to the loft upstairs. It also seems that older people are no longer forced to enroll in the program (in order to bring in more Medicaid money). The same old puzzles and BINGO are available for everyone.

The assisted living home is still promised by the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. — to open in 2005 next to the assisted living home built in 1997 by AVCP Housing and never used as such (then promised to start construction in 2006 for 2008 opening https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2007/01/21/bethels-assisted-living-home-construction-2006/) and now promised for 2nnn Bethel senior day center sign

In the meantime, the City of Bethel raised the sales tax by 20% starting next week– not to fund senior programs or public transportation or disaster preparedness or public infrastructure or to keep the utility rates from going up, but for annual maintenance of a not-yet built swimming pool. As one local elite stated, the poor and elders won’t feel the regressive tax because they get food stamps.

The tax increase won’t go towards any improvement in “community policing” either. Bethel relies heavily on the police to do the things neighbors, family, and friends would rather not. There are now 3 police officers, instead of 12. The elder abuse hot line [1-800-478-9996] was forewarned last August when this became obvious. Unfortunately, the State of Alaska elder abuse hotline is just one person, although assisted by one or two field investigators.


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Funding, grants available 2007 2008

Brookdale Foundation: Relatives as Parents Program

This program is designed to encourage and promote the creation or expansion of services for grandparents and other relatives who have taken on the responsibility of surrogate parenting due to the absence of the parents. The program awards seed grants of $10,000 over a two-year period in two categories: local agencies and state public agencies. Deadlines Local proposals are due January 10, 2008 and State proposals are due by February 8, 2008. For more information see http://www.epa.gov/aging/index.htm#2007_0110_grant_1

National Center on Senior Transportation: Requests for Proposals for Demonstration Grants Deadline December 17, 2007

The National Center on Senior Transportation is soliciting proposals from aging/human service agencies, tribal organizations, faith-based organizations, units of state and local government, public and private transportation providers and other entities interested in developing and implementing innovative approaches to increasing senior transportation options and improving older adult mobility. Successful projects will be collaborative, replicable, and consistent with senior transportation-related goals of the national United We Ride initiative of the Federal Transit Administration. The goals are to: 1.Increase transportation options for older adults; 2. Simplify older adults’ access to transportation services; and 3. Increase the quality of transportation services for older adults. Successful applicants will receive grant awards ranging from $50,000 – $90,000. For more information see http://www.seniortransportation.net

Proposals are due Deadline Monday, Dec. 17, 2007, and should be submitted electronically via email to twilson AT n4a DOT org or using the online form which can be reached through the center’s Web site ( http://www.seniortransportation.net). Electronic or online submission is preferred but hard copies will be accepted. Hard copies of the proposal must be received on or before Dec. 17, 2007. The mailing address is Tabitha Wilson, Assistant Director, NCST, 1730 Rhode Island Ave., NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20036


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