Search Results for 'study'

Study: even light activity helps elderly

By LINDSEY TANNER | July 12, 2006

CHICAGO (AP) – Forget jumping jacks and treadmills. Just doing household chores and other mundane activities of daily living is enough to help older adults live longer, new research suggests….

… the study should be encouraging for those intimidated by traditional exercise, illustrating that activity doesn’t have to be strenuous to be beneficial.

“They used state-of-the-art methodology to answer a very important question, which is how important is it to remain physically active.” … the gold standard of measuring expended energy and more reliable than self-reported activity levels, although they also questioned participants about their habits.

Participants drank specially formulated water that is expelled from the body as carbon dioxide, which is a direct measure of energy use.

[doubly-labelled water using stable isotopes. Still “state of the art” after 30 years!! However, stable isotopes are an excellent, non-invasive method of looking at nutrition, physiology, energy use, etc. ]

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Prisons Not Geared to the Needs of the Elderly, Study Finds

http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000157/story

By 2022, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will incarcerate about thirty thousand elders — individuals who, while they represent the smallest threat to public safety among the prison population, cost the most to imprison, a new report from Legal Services for Prisoners with Children ( http://prisonerswithchildren.org/ ) finds.

Funded by the Los Angeles-based California Endowment, Dignity Denied: the Price of Imprisoning Older Women in California documents the conditions of confinement for the more than three hundred and fifty women over the age of fifty-five in state prisons. According to the report, the “Three Strikes” law and a reluctance to grant parole have left more Californians growing older in prison than ever before. Moreover, health-related expenses push the estimated annual cost of imprisoning an older person to at least $70,000, twice that of a younger prisoner.

The authors of the report further assert that prisons aren’t geared to the needs and vulnerabilities of older people and that their continued incarceration raises fundamental questions of how society treats elders. While many aging prisoners share the same challenges faced by elders in the outside community — bathing, dressing, and using the bathroom — prison policies and everyday routines present unique problems, such as undressing for strip searches, getting assigned to difficult-to-reach top bunks, fighting over limited laundry slots, and waiting in long lines to receive medication. Many older prisoners also report feeling unsafe in their cells and experience difficulties getting help during emergencies.

In an effort to reduce the number of older prisoners, the report recommends the early release of elderly prisoners and supports policy changes to improve prison conditions.

To read or download the complete report (81 pages, PDF), visit: http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000156/report/download

“New Report Calls for Early Release of Elderly Prisoners.” Legal Services for Prisoners With Children Press Release 12/15/05.

http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10000157/story

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Internet an Important Health Tool, But Not for Seniors, Study Finds

http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/189/story

Even as the Internet becomes an increasingly important resource for individuals making decisions about health and healthcare options, a national survey of older Americans by the Kaiser Family Foundation ( http://kff.org/ ) finds that less than a third of seniors age sixty-five and older have ever gone online, compared to more than two-thirds of those between the ages of fifty and sixty-four. According to the report, e-health and the Elderly: How Seniors Use the Internet for Health, only 20 percent of today’s seniors have gone online to look for health information, compared to 53 percent of fifty- to sixty-four-year-olds, who rank the Internet first on a list of media sources of health information. The survey also found that seniors whose annual household income is less than $20,000 a year, including most people on Medicare, are much less likely to have gone online than those with incomes between $20,000 and $49,000.

With the passage of Medicare reform that allows recipients to choose prescrip-tion drug discount cards, the federal Web site Medicare.gov ( http://medicare.gov/ ) has become an important resource for comparing the benefits of competing cards, but the survey finds that few seniors had gone online for such information. “We know that the Internet can be a great health tool for seniors, but the majority are lower-income, less well-educated, and not online,” said Kaiser president and CEO Drew Altman. “It’s time for a national discussion on how to get seniors online.”

“Online Health Information Poised to Become Important Resource for Seniors, But Not There Yet.” Kaiser Family Foundation Press Release 1/12/05. http://kff.org/entmedia/entmedia011205nr.cfm


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Liz Taylor takes comments

One of the best reads ever on aging deliberately is Liz Taylor–
Her series has been mentioned previously –

I just discovered that the columns published at Kitsap Sun Stories: Liz Taylor: Aging Deliberately allow comments (registration required) and have an RSS feed . This is so much more convenient and useful than the Seattle Times venue. I’m not sure which is the primary home for Liz’s work, however, and Kitsap may not carry all her columns. At the Seattle Times I have to subscribe by E-mail to their health series (once a week e-mail, all health stories which are interesting) to get notice of her columns. Otherwise I have a Google News Alert for Liz Taylor+ aging, which sometimes brings in notice of National Velvet. [the colors behind some items below mean nothing except straightening out the code remains to be done.]

Liz Taylor began her career as a federal consumer-fraud investigator and was appointed by Elizabeth Dole in 1976 to direct a nationwide investigation of the nursing-home industry. She’s worked in the aging field ever since.

In the 1980s, Liz became one of the first geriatric care managers in the Pacific Northwest, working with thousands of families and older adults to find high-quality services. In 2000, she founded Aging Deliberately, a business that teaches people how to prepare for their aging so they’ll have more control over what happens to them. In 2005, she served as a delegate to the White House Conference on Aging. She’s won the American Geriatrics Society’s 2007 Aging Awareness Media Award and the Washington Association of Homes and Services for the Aging’s Excellence in Media Award. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/growingolder/

It’s relatively easy to age successfully if you’re wealthy. Money can’t buy happiness, but it certainly allows you to buy the things that make life more comfortable at any age. 1/26/2008 11:00 PM
In my last column, I wrote about a growing problem: what to do when an older person who has dementia hasn’t named anyone she trusts to make decisions for her. This week I’ll tackle a tougher issue: what to do when the person she names does a poor job. 11/17/2007 11:00 PM
My e-mail has had a repeated theme recently: An older person with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, isn’t paying bills, preparing meals, bathing, and other important tasks — but refuses to allow anyone to help.
11/3/2007 09:00 PM |
There’s a certain uniformity to finding a physician under Medicare these days. Rich or poor, if you’re 65 or older, you’re likely to have similar slim pickings (more so if you’re poor and on Medicare and Medicaid). 10/20/2007 11:00 PM |
Most of us want to live a long time, but nobody wants to grow old. The irony is, most of us will — live a long time and grow old. It’s easy to do — all it takes is letting the days roll by. As long as you’re healthy, getting old is a piece of cake.
10/6/2007 11:00 PM |
It’s easy as pie to age well when you’re healthy. The friction comes when you become frail. Sometimes it’s self-inflicted, the product of isolation, poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and falls — all common problems for people who age in their homes but don’t plan it correctly. 9/22/2007 11:00 PM |
A woman in her late 70s, a good friend, is pondering her options. Her home is two stories (or three, including the basement), with many stairs to her bedroom, bathroom and the washing machine. 9/8/2007 11:00 PM
Dad is 87, fun and funny, with moderate dementia. He lived “on the edge” in his own home for years while we kids worried sick. 7/28/2007 11:00 PM
When I was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, cars were sort of round and later sort of square. My dad wore a hat to work and took the bus.
7/14/2007 11:00 PM
I’m 75 and have lived in an assisted-living facility for a year.
7/8/2007 02:00 AM
Older people are not simply younger people with wrinkles our bodies change dramatically as we age, both inside and out; some parts wear out before others, sometimes several at once.
6/17/2007 02:00 AM
Whether you live at home, in a retirement community, or in a yurt on top of a mountain, as you age, you want to do it consciously.
6/3/2007 02:00 AM

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Vibrators and exercise for strength among the frail

There has been additional research into vibrating platforms as a means to improve bone and muscle health. An earlier post is here,

  • Vibrating beds as osteoporosis exercise
  • These platforms may be similar to one manufactured by Soloflex and one about to come out by Nintendo Wii. The Wii will have a game console attached for using video games as an exercise on a balance board. The news reports don’t mention how the human tests are done.

    Other Wii games mentioned earlier–

  • Ideas to exercise in small cold places
  • The SoloFlex would be easy to set-up as a study in a senior center. See the news story (Boston Globe) Vibrating machines are studied for health benefits. A home machine called Soloflex Whole Body Vibration Platform is smaller and less powerful, generating more of a massage sensation at the lowest setting. More and stronger vibration doesn’t mean faster results and could be dangerous as the article points out. There would have to be modifications for those with balance problems. However, measures of muscle strength, balance, and coordination are easy enough to set up.

    Here’s a cautious review from epinions.com– It is considered a class 1 Medical Device by the FDA. Those who shouldn’t use this are recovering from surgery, have heart disease, neurological conditions, pre-existing deep vein thrombosis, joint implants or are pregnant.

    No one has yet tested vibrating motel beds (don’t forget your condom amulets http://www.alittleredhen.com/a_little_red_hen/2007/09/safe-sex-alerts.html or http://www.alittleredhen.com/a_little_red_hen/2007/10/jenna-bush-wear.html

    Vibrations Shown to Build Bone, Reduce Fat (National Public Radio)

    Morning Edition, October 29, 2007 · Standing on a gently vibrating platform for 15 minutes a day can build bone mass and reduce fat in mice, according to a new study. The changes are due to a stem cell in bone marrow that can become muscle, bone or fat. Testing has begun in humans…. Scientists are about to launch a similar study in humans. Douglas Kiel works at the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew Senior Life in Boston, where subjects will soon get 10 minutes of jiggling a day.

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