Search Results for 'science education'

SEC and NASD Investor Education Foundation

There are lots of good suggestions here. Recurrent themes —

  • need for cooperation amongst the regulators / law enforcement / non-profits / service agencies / etc.;
  • where to find help isn’t clear;
  • socialability (sp?) should be turned against the scammers (don’t isolate yourself: use your social skills to find and share accurate information)
  • as my friend John Aguino (NM Council on Indian Aging) says, elderlies need to know their rights and stand up for themselves.

By Lauren Dake | Contributor to The Christian Science Monitor, from the July 24, 2006 edition

WASHINGTON – Frieda White was the perfect target. Recently divorced, the 70-year-old hoped to supplement her monthly $1,196 fixed income by starting a small business out of her home. When Ms. White received an e-mail purportedly looking for eBay workers, she didn’t see any harm in responding. Not long after White hit “reply,” she received a phone call that would persuade her to take out a $5,365 loan on her Discover card to start her own business….

The SEC took a step in that direction last week when it hosted its first-ever Seniors Summit in Washington, D.C….
[http://www.sec.gov/news/press/2006/2006-109.htm]

Part of the solution, officials say, is teaching seniors how to spot the scammers. Another part is greater cooperation among various levels of law enforcement…. State and federal regulators from across the country met to discuss ways to combat investment fraud as well as a new report on the tactics scammers use. The study, released by the NASD Investor Education Foundation, may help blunt what regulators worry will be an increasing trend: scammers targeting seniors.

…Since states use different titles for their regulators, finding the right person to contact can be difficult. The NASAA’s website (www.nasaa.org), has a link titled “contact your regulator,” and the NASD has a hotline (800-289-9999) that can help investors determine whether sellers are licensed and whether there have been any complaints or legal action taken against their company.

"How seniors can spot a con more easily"
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0724/p13s01-lign.html?s=hns


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Boris Chertok, nonagenarian, and Sputnik, quinquagenarian

It’s pretty amazing to have outlived the Soviet Union and been able to recall how science is actually conducted (gosh, it’s a human activity!)

Boris Chertok, Oct 2006 photo click photo to view Voice of America article

the first artificial satellite in space was a spur-of-the-moment gamble driven by the dream of one scientist, whose team scrounged a rocket, slapped together a satellite and persuaded a dubious Kremlin to open the Space Age.

And that winking light that crowds around the globe gathered to watch in the night sky? Not Sputnik at all, as it turns out, but just the second stage of its booster rocket, according to Boris Chertok, one of the founders of the Soviet space program.

Chertok couldn’t whisper a word about the project through much of his lifetime. His name, and that of Sergei Korolyov, the chief scientist, were a state secret. Today, at age 95 and talking to a small group of reporters in Moscow, Chertok can finally speak about his pivotal role in the history of space exploration.

“Each of these first rockets was like a beloved woman for us,” he said. “We were in love with every rocket; we desperately wanted it to blast off successfully. We would give our hearts and souls to see it flying.” …

The satellite, weighing just 184 pounds, was built in less than three months. Soviet designers built a pressurized sphere of polished aluminum alloy with two radio transmitters and four antennas. An earlier satellite project envisaged a cone shape, but Korolyov preferred the sphere.

“The Earth is a sphere, and its first satellite also must have a spherical shape,” Chertok, a longtime deputy of Korolyov, recalled him saying. […]

I hope the story stays up on the news site. It is an interesting read.


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Summer 2008 New Mexico Geriatric Institute

from ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV– 2008-04-25 mentioned earlier, I see. So this becomes a reminder 😉

https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=486
Information below about the New Mexico Geriatric Summer Institute – a favorite course of many over the years, with no registration fees for Indian Health professionals.
Bruce Finke, MD
IHS / Nashville Area Elder Health Consultant
Chronic Care Initiative
(413) 584-0790

[deadline] June 19-21, 2008 Summer 2008 Geriatric Institute The New Mexico Geriatric Education Center (NMGEC) is pleased to announce the Summer 2008 Geriatric Institute to be held on June 19-21, 2008, at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center, 2500 Carlisle Blvd. NE, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with CME/CEUs offered. The title this year is Better Outcomes, Healthier Elders: Collaboration in Management of Chronic Disease. The last half day of the Institute will be on Health Literacy which can be applied toward a Certificate in Health Literacy of 25 credit hours. Additional sessions for the certificate will be announced soon.

Tuition waivers will be available to Tribal and Indian Health Service health care professionals to attend the Summer Geriatric Institute.

Please visit the NMGEC website at http://hsc.unm.edu/som/fcm/gec for more information on upcoming events. If you should require additional assistance, you can reach
Cly Clytemnestra Davison, Program Coordinator cdavison AT saludDOTunmDOTedu New Mexico Geriatric Education Center UNM Health Sciences Center, Dept. FCM MSC09 5040
1001 Medical Arts Ave NE, Room 244 Albuquerque, NM 87102-2708
505-272-4934 phone
505-272-4962 fax


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Bath falls common among older adults, but can be prevented

This isn’t new news but the use of videotape for actual “ethology” (observation of behavior) is a good idea. It is most worthwhile to remind everyone that ordinary bathroom fixtures are not suitable for those needing assistance and are not appropriate for older people; frequently not even appropriate for anyone, tall or short, lithe or lazy. See the Bethel Senior Center for what should be banned in public facilities (When you visit the senior center). Emphasis added.

Public release date: 13-Sep-2006,

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-09/uomh-bfc091306.php

Installation of proper equipment essential

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Getting in and out of the bathtub or shower can be a perilous journey for older adults, even when they have bathrooms already equipped with safety features, according to research by the University of Michigan Health System.

Researchers videotaped people ages 60 and older who demonstrated (while fully clothed) how they normally climbed in and out of the shower or tub. One-third of the 89 participants in the study had difficulty, such as plopping onto a tub seat or hitting the side of the tub or the shower threshold with their legs.

“We found that there are a lot of independently bathing older adults who have trouble or are unsafe getting into and out of the tub or shower stall,” says lead author Susan L. Murphy, ScD, OTR, an occupational therapist and research assistant professor with the University of Michigan Medical School’s Division of Geriatric Medicine, part of the Department of Internal Medicine. The study appears in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

“For older adults, losing the ability to bathe is associated with having falls, fracturing bones, and even being admitted to a nursing home. It is important that we take steps to help to prevent bathing disability before it occurs,” Murphy says.

One of the major problem areas the researchers found involved sliding glass doors in showers. Three-quarters of participants who used shower stalls with sliding glass doors tried to utilize the door for stability or balance.

“This is extremely unsafe because shower doors were not designed to support a person’s weight,” Murphy says. “This problem could be easily remedied by educating older adults not to use the door as a support or possibly replacing it with a shower curtain, which was used only rarely by older adults in this study.”

Participants in the study were residents of two congregate housing facilities and had no cognitive impairment. They were videotaped as they demonstrated how they used their environment while getting into and out of the shower or tub – that is, whether they used grab-bars, towel bars, shower curtains, glass doors, tub seats, and other parts of the tub to assist themselves.

The videotapes were also evaluated for the participants’ fluidity of movement and whether they had difficulty negotiating the environment. While the majority of people using both tubs and shower stalls used safe environmental features such as grab bars, many used unsafe features in addition to the safe ones. Nineteen percent of participants using a tub were evaluated as using unsafe features, and more than 70 percent of those with shower stalls used unsafe features, such as the glass door, towel bar or a tub seat. One participant had a plastic lawn chair as a tub seat, a particularly dangerous device given curved shape of the tub floor.

Some safety problems researchers observed can be fixed easily such as the installation of a shower curtain in place of a door, and proper instruction about built-in bathroom safety features (such as grab bars designed for weight-bearing) for new residents of senior housing facilities. A focus on better designs of bathrooms in senior housing facilities was also suggested by the researchers.

“We think the results from this study demonstrate the need for healthcare professionals to become involved in helping to prevent bathing disability, instead of just treating people in the hospital after they have had a fall in the bathroom,” she says. “While bathrooms in senior housing facilities are designed to be safe, we have found that older adults often do not know the difference between a grab bar and a towel bar. They also have unsafe strategies of getting into and out of their shower or tub. Occupational therapists often see older adults for bathing problems and would be ideal to intervene with older adults before they start to lose the ability to bathe.”

###

In addition to Murphy, the authors on the paper were Neil B. Alexander, M.D., professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and director of the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System; Linda V. Nyquist, Ph.D., senior research associate-social sciences, Institute of Gerontology; and Debra M. Strasburg, M.S., P.T., research physical therapist, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System.

The research was supported in part by grants from the AARP Andrus Foundation, the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research & Development, and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Claude Pepper Older Adults Independence Center. Murphy is a recipient of a K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and Alexander is a recipient of a K24 Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research from NIA.

Citation: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Aug. 2006, “Bath Transfers in Older Adult Congregate Housing Residents: Assessing the Person-Environment Interaction.”

Contact: Katie Gazella, kgazella AT umich DOT edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System


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Algorithm as aid to improve seating

Someone else has been looking for information about making or modifying seating and furniture for older people. I tracked down this article, but it is unavailable to non-subscribers.

There is a need for a procedure or instructions for producing (or purchasing, High Seat Chairs – UK Furniture for the elderly) safe furniture. [see earlier, ES&H Avoid dangerous furniture design principles and here, furniture [ES&H]] I once located a little software program ** which could calculate ergonomical designs for lifting, sitting, etc. But that isn’t sufficient or clear enough for the ordinary consumer or handyperson to use.

We could use up-to-date, cross-cultural anthropometric research, too.

If anyone finds a good resource, let us know, please.
Continue reading ‘Algorithm as aid to improve seating’

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