Search Results for 'rescue'

Pets and Katrina

There has been a lot of discussion since Katrina about the role of companion animals in disaster preparation and evacuation. Animals have demonstrated advantages for the health of older people, even the very old and frail (and even as visitors than live-in companions).

Here is another aspect to the discussion.

Lost in Katrina and in new homes – whose pet now? By Patrik Jonsson, The Christian Science Monitor

…The lawsuits are efforts to reunite family members – even fuzzy ones – who have been separated by Katrina. They also raise troubling questions about whether animals should be treated as property or as members of the family – and which homes they belong in.

“We’re trying to distinguish between dog-nappers and good-faith finders, and that’s a huge gray area right now from hurricane Katrina,” says David Favre, a law professor at Michigan State University in Lansing and an animal law expert….

In many cases, overwhelmed shelters were forced to find new homes for pets that had not been claimed even after pictures were posted on the Internet….

State laws, so far, are on the side of the original owners because pets are considered property, not family, law experts say. “Finders, keepers” laws state that property must be abandoned for at least a year before original owners lose their rights to it unless the finders can prove they made a good-faith effort to find the owner. In Louisiana, the requirement is three years. In January, a New Jersey judge ordered a family to return a dog adopted after Katrina to its owner in New Orleans….

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0721/p01s03-ussc.html?s=hns


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New international consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation

American Heart Association emergency cardiovascular care guidelines 2005 are now available here, offering lay rescuers and healthcare providers recommendations for treating cardiovascular emergencies. The importance of effective chest compressions also is stressed.

The European guidelines have been adopted by the Resuscitation Council (UK) without modification (www.resus.org.uk).

The Resuscitation Council (UK) now recommends:

For adults:

* CPR with a chest compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2
* no initial ventilations before starting compressions
* when professional help is delayed for more than 4-5 minutes, one option is to give compressions for up to three minutes before attempting defibrillation
* compressions for two minutes after defibrillation
* if coordinated rhythm is not restored by defibrillation, second and further shocks should be given only after additional cycles of chest compressions

For children:

* solo lay rescuers should give CPR with a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2
* two rescuers (usually healthcare professionals) should use a ratio of 15:2

For neonates:

? will almost certainly be anoxic, so still need a ratio of 3:1″

Nosy sons save mother via webcam – Engadget

Really wasn’t nosiness (see here http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/11/18/internet.rescue.ap/)

Posted Nov 18, 2005, 11:40 AM ET by Marc Perton

If you thought webcams were only good for video calls, monitoring coffee pots and traffic conditions and, of course, pr0n, think again. Karin Jordal, a 69-year-old artist was recently rescued by her far-flung sons after they discovered, via her webcam, that she had collapsed in her California home. One son, in the Philippines, was spying checking up on his mom, when he saw her lying motionless on the couch in her living room. He called his brother in Norway, who contacted an ambulance, which arrived in 10 minutes, telemergency style. The mother had apparently been in a diabetic coma for about two hours, and is now in a hospital recovering. Of course, she’s lucky that her boys were checking the cam when she passed out; they may want to consider giving her some kind of panic button to use in case they’re not glued to the screen next time she collapses.

Special-needs evacuation

City had evacuation plan but strayed from strategy
By LISE OLSEN Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle

….
The Chronicle reviewed Louisiana’s Emergency Operations Plan, adopted in 2000. It calls for the establishment of specialized shelters for people with special medical needs. It also recommends that cities use public transportation to evacuate residents if necessary.
….
People who called for information on special needs shelters Saturday were directed to sites in Alexandria and in Monroe, La. — cities 218 and 326 miles away. The state scrambled to find 20 ambulances and some specialized vans to pick up fragile residents who needed rides.
….
Some, including Lower 9th Ward resident Lois Rice, a paraplegic, became trapped in their homes when the floodwaters rose. She was rescued after using her air mattress to float into her attic.

Florida, by contrast, for two decades has required counties to establish and maintain permanent databases of “special needs citizens,” and arrange rides for people with no transportation. The state also has sheltersestablished for myriad medical conditions.

Florida emergency officials agree that last-minute planning simply doesn’t work.
….
In New Orleans, many people with special medical needs ended up at the last resort shelter in the Superdome.
….

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

Fran Marscher Christian Science Monitor, Aug 22, 2004

HILTON HEAD, S.C. — Hurricane Charley demonstrated last weekend why some of the nation’s most vulnerable folk — the ill, the disabled, and the frail elderly — should think twice before taking up residence in the most dangerous parts of the hurricane-prone coastal regions. For those most at risk, public policymakers ought to discourage or prohibit development on the riskiest lands.

Last Saturday morning, rescue workers found a stunned and bewildered elderly woman alone in a smashed cinder-block condominium in a retirement community in one of the hard-hit areas of southwest Florida. Could she have evacuated? Did she understand ahead of time – – and in time — the threat to her life? Could she have packed her most precious belongings and driven herself through heavy traffic out of harm’s way to a safe place to spend the night? Now that her retirement home is wrecked beyond livability, where will she go?
….

Along with the responsibility of individuals for their own choices, elected officials have responsibilities for planning and zoning restrictions in the public interest. To often, they fan the fires of growth instead of looking after those unable to help themselves.

Assisted-living facilities have sprung up almost as fast as tennis courts near the nation’s beaches. By definition, thousands of their residents are incapable of evacuating themselves when a hurricane whirls offshore and aims landward. Their problems range from aches, pains and stiffness, to dependence on wheelchairs and bottled oxygen. In short, they need others to help them make it through every day. They should not be subjected either to the stress of hurricane evacuations or to the havoc of hurricane impact.
….

Living quarters for folk who are fragile, whether because of illness or age, should be sited appropriately — miles inland if necessary — certainly not on land likely to be flooded or subject to a hurricane’s highest winds. Further, all buildings anywhere in the coastal zones — but especially those housing the ill and the disabled, and those unable to live on their own — should be required to be built or retrofitted to withstand hurricane-force winds.

Where we call ourselves civilized, policymakers are obligated to protect those who cannot protect themselves.


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

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