Search Results for 'neurology'

Tolstoy’s Bicyclist nonagenarian George Dawson and brain fitness

“Some people say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” Edwards said. “So I always like to mention George Dawson. He died a couple of years ago at age 102 or 103. What’s remarkable about George Dawson is that he learned to read at age 98.”

Dawson, of Texas, who was the grandson of slaves, then collaborated with co-author Richard Glaubman to write his autobiography, “Life is So Good,”‘ published in 2000 by Random House.

2011-05-28 Oprah recently posted this video about Mr Dawson’s legacy, George Dawson’s Legacy May 13, 2011

According to this entry, Mr Dawson published his first book at 102 years.

African American Read-In has a more detailed biography, “George Dawson also received two Doctorates of Humane letters from Texas Weslyan University and New School of New York City. In 2002, George Dawson Middle School was named in his honor in Southlake, Texas.” Click the photo to visit. George Dawson reading at 102

Mr Dawson’s accomplishments came up in a news summary of what the latest studies say about retaining or improving mental agility (caffeine in women. not men, is another finding). The summary is pretty good about the types of “neurobics” (stupid term, IMO) which are recommended more and more frequently. They also note the relationship between physical exercise and mental ability, “The general concept is: what’s good for your heart is good for your brain,” Mirza said.

In Bethel, they will probably just hide another jigsaw piece I hear they still won’t let the elderlies run the place.

Work your way to brain fitness
Posted by Linda S. Mah/Gazette August 21, 2007 17:14PM

…Physical exercise, social involvement, challenging activities and new experiences are all recommended as ways to help keep our brains in top-notch condition.

“The analogy may be trite, but the brain is like a muscle,” said Morry Edwards, a licensed clinical psychologist with Neuropsychology Associates in Kalamazoo. “The circuits strengthen when you use your brain. If you don’t, the circuits fade.”…

“Some more-recent research shows it’s not just the exercise but the type of exercise or variety of exercise that you do which is important,” Mirza said.
[…]

O’Folks off their rocker Add this to Bookmarks:

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Long-term lead exposure linked to cognitive decline in older adults

It is likely that there will be fewer such effects in the future as the use of leaded gasoline and in housepaint would have declined. The problem isn’t so much that the lead is locked into the bone, but that as one ages, and if one reduces activity, the bone will be resorbed (re-used) to provide the calcium needed for muscle (e.g., heart), neuron activity, and for new bone or re-modelling of bone. Thus, the “old” lead becomes accessible to the brain again. If you know of anyone who had exposure to lead as a child, perhaps a more detailed exam would be warranted by a physician.

“Public release date: 13-Sep-2006

American Academy of Neurology
Long-term lead exposure linked to cognitive decline in older adults

ST. PAUL, Minn – Older adults exposed to high levels of lead before the 1980s are showing signs of cognitive decrements as a result of long-term lead exposure in their communities, according to a study published in the online edition of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study involved 985 adults randomly selected throughout the city of Baltimore, Maryland. The participants were between the ages of 50 and 70 years old and had been exposed to higher levels of lead prior to the 1980s when lead had been used extensively in commercial products.

In determining the association between high levels of lead and lower cognitive performance, researchers tested the amount of lead in the tibia, or shinbone, since lead accumulates in bone. Participants also performed 20 cognitive tests to measure language, processing speed, eye-hand coordination, executive functioning, verbal memory and learning, and visual memory.

The study found higher tibia lead levels were consistently associated with worse cognitive performance on tests.

“The analysis showed the effect of community lead exposure was equivalent to two to six years of aging,” said principal investigator Brian Schwartz, MD, with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. “If lead is associated with lower cognitive performance, this may suggest possible treatment and prevention options for older adults.”

In addition, the study found tibia lead levels were significantly higher in African Americans compared to Caucasians. Researchers say the difference likely represents the long-term higher environmental lead exposures sustained by African Americans in the United States, but could also be due to different bone mineral densities in African Americans compared to Caucasians.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-09/aaon-lle091306.php


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About, Site Index

This site is being transferred from theelderlies.blogspot.com. Unfortunately, the links associated with post titles do not import into Word Press. Please bear with me as I tidy up. Or, visit the earlier site for the original postings.

vuee
E-mail address is
ofolkrockers email

2007-02-23 A new way to visualize the site contents is the Tag cloud click here

Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)


Site Search Tags: (in addition to categories) or search on your own terms in the little box in the upper right of the pages. Synonyms will often find different posts. For example, if one is looking for Alzheimer’s checklists, search for dementia, tool (as in assessment tool), neurology, long-term care.

This type of index (search tags) has some bugs, still. It searches the webpage, not the individual posts or pages. Thus, if the term overlaps whatever is in the sidebars or headers, the results may be of everything (and therefore useless). I’m working on this….
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everywhere else,
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Web refs I found useful

http://www.merck.com/mrkshared/mmg/sec5/ch40/ch40a.jsp
Merck Manual of geriatrics Chapter 40. Dementia

Types of Dementia
http://www.cchs.net/health/health-info/doc…2340.asp?index=9170

http://neurology.health-cares.net/dementia.php
http://neurology.health-cares.net/lewy-body-dementia.php (paralysis and cognitive impairment)

Nursing Homes
http://www.longtermcarelink.net/about_nursing_homes.html


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