Search Results for 'movies'

Six retirees, recalling their delight in outdoor movies, bring free films to remote villages.

Six retirees, recalling their delight in outdoor movies, bring free films to remote villages.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-movies25dec25,0,4337246,full.story?coll=la-home-headlines

About a generation ago, this was how most Chinese watched movies: under
the stars, and mostly for free. Now a group of six retired men is trying to revive this Maoist-era tradition. Strapping an old projector and rusty cases of film reels on the back of a motorbike, they’ve been traveling rugged country roads to bring the magic of cinema to remote villages untouched by the marvels of the big screen….

This year is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Chinese cinema. In 1905, the story goes, China’s first homemade silent movie was born in a Beijing photo studio. By the 1930s, the cosmopolitan city of Shanghai had become known as China’s Hollywood….

But it was communism that gave Chinese motion pictures a new purpose. The Communist Party relied on films to deliver mass entertainment as well as political propaganda. Film brigades became part of the landscape….

Now that China has switched to a bustling market economy, even in the countryside people can watch grainy television soap operas and pop in a pirated DVD for less than a dollar. Many old cinemas have shuttered their doors. Outdoor theaters are practically unheard of….

“China has 900 million peasants, and they need spiritual nourishment,” said Rao Changdong, 62, one of the founders of the movie caravan, whose volunteers fund the project almost entirely out of their own pockets. “VCDs and DVDs are fine, but they are limited to the small family and small screen. Movies are better because it’s more about community interaction and the big family.”…

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Otto Friend, nonagenarian

The Delta Discovery is one of our regional newspapers. Many of the articles may also be read on-line. Unfortunately, there isn’t a photo of Mr. Friend.

10-15-08
by Jodi Friend, student Kuskokwim Campus

My paternal grandfather Otto Friend has lived in the native village of Kwigillingok, a costal village located on the Southwestern Region of Alaska, nearly all his life.

When my grandfather was a young boy, most of the Yup’ik people in the village lived on the left side of the Kwigillingok River, while only a few lived on the right side.

…what are my grandfather’s personality, favorite foods, and hobbies?
My grandfather is mean, grumpy, strict, selfish, and forgetful at times, but he is also humorous, caring, and loving. His nickname is “Apiin” (similar to grandfather) and “Dad.”

Otto loves to eat blackberry “akutaq” (Eskimo ice cream), beluga whale blubber, dried salmon, white fish, bird soup, and loves drinking Red Rose tea with his elder friends.

His hobbies include watching Kung Fu movies, taking naps, snow machine riding, checking the Kwigillingok River, playing with his grandchildren, working on seal skin, carving wood, and taking steam baths.

… After serving in the Alaskan Territorial Guard (ATG), his sight has not been the same. My paternal aunts and uncles told me that Otto, little by little, stopped going subsistence hunting because of his affected vision. Although he has this problem, it does not keep him from being in charge of how the gathered and hunted food is prepared or stored for the winter.

Right now, he’s 90-years-old and he still walks and takes a steam bath in the “maqivik” (steam house or sauna) just about every night…. In conclusion, Otto is a lot of fun to be around. I admire and respect him because he has been through so much in his life and because he has a lot of experience when it comes to subsistence living. He is also a very good grandfather, not just to me, but to my other relatives as well. […]


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Boris Chertok, nonagenarian, and Sputnik, quinquagenarian

It’s pretty amazing to have outlived the Soviet Union and been able to recall how science is actually conducted (gosh, it’s a human activity!)

Boris Chertok, Oct 2006 photo click photo to view Voice of America article

the first artificial satellite in space was a spur-of-the-moment gamble driven by the dream of one scientist, whose team scrounged a rocket, slapped together a satellite and persuaded a dubious Kremlin to open the Space Age.

And that winking light that crowds around the globe gathered to watch in the night sky? Not Sputnik at all, as it turns out, but just the second stage of its booster rocket, according to Boris Chertok, one of the founders of the Soviet space program.

Chertok couldn’t whisper a word about the project through much of his lifetime. His name, and that of Sergei Korolyov, the chief scientist, were a state secret. Today, at age 95 and talking to a small group of reporters in Moscow, Chertok can finally speak about his pivotal role in the history of space exploration.

“Each of these first rockets was like a beloved woman for us,” he said. “We were in love with every rocket; we desperately wanted it to blast off successfully. We would give our hearts and souls to see it flying.” …

The satellite, weighing just 184 pounds, was built in less than three months. Soviet designers built a pressurized sphere of polished aluminum alloy with two radio transmitters and four antennas. An earlier satellite project envisaged a cone shape, but Korolyov preferred the sphere.

“The Earth is a sphere, and its first satellite also must have a spherical shape,” Chertok, a longtime deputy of Korolyov, recalled him saying. […]

I hope the story stays up on the news site. It is an interesting read.


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Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

Ethnic stereotyping and ageism

The post office box this week held an issue of the New Yorker which generated mixed feelings. Many New Yorker cartoons (http://www.cartoonbank.com/) are funny because they skewer our fallacies and foibles using the stereotypes we all have about each other. Most of the stereotypes protrayed are of rich white folk.

This recent cartoon is funny because it reveals the biased attitude many employers have towards older workers. Unfortunately, the medium of expressing a worthy idea is based upon an ethnic stereotype which is problematic, at the best.


by Lee Lorenz

Hold it—we almost forgot his benefits package.” (Two eskimos sending a third out to sea on a small slab of ice.)

ID: 122851, Published in The New Yorker September 11, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/fzgsq

The stereotype underlying the cartoon’s point about ageism is false. Recently we had a physician lie about just such a scenario, up north. People were quite hurt by the accusation.

JAMA falls foul of fabricated suicide story [JAMA is Journal of the American Medical Association]

by Deborah Josefson, San Francisco

An essay published in JAMA’s Piece of my Mind section, has stirred controversy after it was revealed that the events depicted in it were fictional.

The essay was written by a medical student, Shetal Shah, and appeared last October (JAMA 2000;284:1897-8). In his essay, Mr Shah described an encounter with a 97 year old Inuit [sic. Eskimo people live in Alaska and Inuit people live in Canada.] man, a toothless elderly member of the Siberian Yupik tribe, who, feeling useless, came to say goodbye to the young medical student before committing suicide by walking off into a frozen tundra in the morning fog.

In a letter to JAMA, Dr Michael Swenson, a physician with Norton Health Sound in Nome, Alaska, and Shah’s tutor during his elective, denied the existence of such a patient. Moreover, Dr Swenson charged that Mr Shah’s false account promulgates false stereotypes about the Inuit people and perpetuates ancient myths…. Dr Swenson said that he understood Mr Shah’s tweaking of events to make them more of a story but said that the account was entirely fictional and as such reflected more of our culture’s prejudices towards elderly people than those of the Siberian Yupik….

Read the story in the British Medical Journal, on-line here

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/323/7311/472/a

I’m not sure there is any evidence for any such a scenario in the past, except maybe under extreme conditions of long ago.

Certainly, such a slur against a large group of US citizens should not have been printed in the New Yorker. As the response to the BMJ article said,

When will medical journals learn to leave anecdotes for Cosmopolitan and fictionalized accounts for the New Yorker? The author’s explanatory note is lame in the extreme. BMJ 2001;323:472 ( 1 September )

On the other hand, I am not as troubled by Sam Gross’ cartoon at the bottom, in part because he skewers every stereotype and in part because it highlights so well the predominant establishment attitude around here about caring and valuing older people.

This is 2006. We have no nursing home; we had an assisted living residence, which was never used as such. Another assisted living residence was promised to open September 2005. After several people inquired publicly, the health corp. finally announced it might open in 2008.

July 15, 2006, Assisted living home construction could begin soon

Construction on an Assisted Living Home in the YK Delta for elders and adults with disabilities may be just beyond the horizon.

“Establishing an assisted living home is important because we have an aging population in our region and we don’t have a facility where we can take care of them properly,” said Gene Peltola, CEO of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation.

Despite the fact that the elderly make up one of the fastest growing populations in the YK Delta, the region remains as the only area in Alaska that has no long-term assisted living facility.

http://www.ykhc.org/1253.cfm

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


by Danny Shanahan

“Remember, son, it’s never too early to start saving for retirement.” (Father talking to son as he pushes an elderly Eskimo out to sea on an ice floe.)

ID: 46757, Published in The New Yorker November 26, 2001, http://tinyurl.com/gqwvu

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by Christopher Weyant

“It’s your mother. She’s floated back.” (Two eskimos watch a third float back on his ice floe.)

ID: 122883, Published in The New Yorker September 18, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/znx2s

I have never appreciated mother-in-law jokes as they are inherently misogynist. The above is next week’s New Yorker take on Eskimos.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

by Sam Gross

“Are you sure this ice floe is going to pass by the nursing home?” (Elderly Eskimo on ice floe shouts back to family who are waving good-bye.)

ID: 42864, Published in The New Yorker November 22, 1999, http://tinyurl.com/j6soq

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ann Fienup-Riordan, Ph.D. has explored Alaska Eskimo stereotypes and other portrayals in the movies—
Freeze Frame book jacket

http://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/FIEFRP.html

“Freeze Frame, Alaska Eskimos in the Movies” by Ann Fienup-Riordan, Pub Date: August 2003,
ISBN:Paper: 0-295-98337-X


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O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

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