Search Results for 'mental health'

HEALTHY COMMUNITIES FOR ACTIVE AGING GRANTS

I would love to help develop this, but grants aren’t made to individuals.

from WHAT’S UP – October 15, 2008
Compiled Weekly by Peg Tileston On behalf of the Alaska Women’s Environmental Network (AWEN), Alaska Center for the Environment (ACE), and Alaska Conservation Alliance (ACA)

*November 21
Deadline for proposal submission for THE EPA BUILD HEALTHY COMMUNITIES FOR ACTIVE AGING GRANTS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to award in early 2009, two grants for $100,000 each to train older adults to be environmental leaders and demonstrate how greenways and sustainable streets can improve the environment, human health and the quality of life for persons of all ages. Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging Training and Demonstration Projects must include a strategy that either 1) trains older adults to be environmental leaders on local planning decisions that affect their community’s built environment; or 2) demonstrates how greenways and sustainable streets can improve the quality of life for persons of all ages while improving environmental quality. For purposes of this RFP Greenways and Sustainable Streets are defined as follows: Greenways are linear corridors of open space. They include natural corridors (e.g., along a stream, river, or ridge), canals, rail road rights of way converted to recreational use, and trails. They link places together, inviting city and community residents to experience a connection with the natural environment. Greenways connect neighborhoods, downtowns, schools, community centers, and other important public places. They can include waterfront walkways, stream corridors and other natural ecological reserves, as well as off-street biking and walking paths. Sustainable Streets are a multimodal rights-of-way designed and operated to create benefits to mobility, community and ecology. They are streets that use sustainable design principles that promote safe, least-polluting ways to connect people and incorporate natural, landscape-based methods that infiltrate, reuse, or evaportranspirate (allow water to evaporate back into the air) stormwater runoff, and mitigate the “urban heat island effect” (the additional heating in the air over a city as the result of replacement of vegetated surfaces with those composed of heat-retaining, man-made materials such as asphalt and dark colored roofing). Eligible entities include States, or state agencies, the District of Columbia, territories, American Indian Tribes (federally recognized), and possessions of the U.S. It is also available to public and private universities and colleges, hospitals, laboratories, other public or private nonprofit institutions, and 501(c)(3) organizations. For more information, go to http://www.epa.gov/aging/grants/index.htm#2008_1121_grant_1.


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EPA Technical Assistance Building Healthy Communities

Request for Applications: Smart Growth Implementation Assistance
Opportunities for Technical Assistance for Communities Interested in Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging.

Are you trying to encourage smart growth activities that will help prepare for older adults in your community? Are you trying to encourage specific smart growth techniques like transit-oriented development? Or direct your state department of transportation investments to better support smart growth? Are you looking to use smart growth to reach economic development goals? Do you need help analyzing guidelines for school investments that best fit your state or community? Do you need to retrofit a commercial corridor? Or coordinate your community’s smart growth design with an active aging program?

The Development, Community, and Environment Division in U.S. EPA’s Office of Policy, Economics, and Innovation is responding to this need by issuing a request for applications for the Smart Growth Implementation Assistance program. Through this program, a team of multidisciplinary experts will provide free technical assistance to communities, regions, or states that want to develop in ways that meet environmental and other local or regional goals.

Communities, regions, and states around the country are interested in building stronger neighborhoods, protecting their environmental resources, enhancing public health, and planning for development, but they may lack the tools, resources, or information to achieve these goals. EPA can help applicants overcome these roadblocks by providing evaluation tools and expert analysis.

EPA is soliciting applications from communities that want help with either policy analysis or public participatory processes. Selected communities will receive assistance in the form of a multi-day visit from a team of experts organized by EPA and other national partners to work with local leaders. Applications will be accepted until March 8, 2007. [deadline]

For more information and application materials, please go to

    from the EPA Aging Initiative List-Serv

EPA has developed five fact sheets for older adults and their caregivers related to environmental health topics. Many of these fact sheets have been translated into the common languages spoken for older adults and their caregivers. The purple series was also created to reach individuals with limited reading ability, for those persons reading at roughly the 5th grade level. ( See http://epa.gov/aging/resources/factsheets/index.htm#lowlit ) In addition, on line, one can find copies of the fact sheets with large print for persons with limited vision http://epa.gov/aging/resources/factsheets/index.htm#lowvision Fact sheets are available in hard copy at no cost or can be downloaded at the EPA Aging Initiative website. http://www.epa.gov/aging/resources/factsheets/index.htm#fs

[If rural communities need assistance with developing a project, I know of a candidate, willing to relocate.]


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Grants: Developmental Research on Elder Mistreatment

This could be especially useful for small communities. Some of our neglect and mistreatment can be spotted, if not understood why (Neglect of Bethel Elders again, Senior Center staff defends care of elders, Letter to the Editor On Neglecting Seniors, ). But we have other instances which are not seen, not recognized Elder Abuse and Neglect Assessment, or even generally recognized as acceptable (and therefore not recognized as mistreatment). We tend to think of mistreatment as only an institutional problem, but if a community is too small to have institutional awareness, what then?

Department of Health and Human Services announces funds to initiate the systematic scientific study of Elder Mistreatment in community and institutional settings. The research priority areas include: (1) innovative methods for estimating incidence; (2) standardization of definitions and measurement; (3) elaboration of risk factors; (4) methods of survey, clinical, and psychosocial identification of Elder Mistreatment; and (5) identification of Elder Mistreatment in institutional settings. Eligible applicants include city or township governments, county governments, independent school districts, public and state controlled institutions of higher education, state governments, nonprofits, faith-based organizations, private institutions of higher education, and for-profit organizations. The deadline for applications is October 25, 2006. Approximately $1,100,000 is available to fund awards up to $200,000. For further information, contact NIH OER Webmaster at FBOWebmaster AT OD DOT NIH.GOV; or go to:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-06-009.html

Info courtesy of http://library.med.utah.edu/blogs/BHIC/archives/cat_scholarships_and_grants.html#001735


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Environmental Impacts of Hurricane Katrina

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2006. http://scout.wisc.edu/ (a most excellent resource)

Environmental Impacts of Hurricane Katrina [pdf]
http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/hurricane_katrina/

Over the past few months, a number of government agencies have worked diligently to assist those affected by Hurricane Katrina, often working in tandem with other units of government throughout the region. One agency that is working to assess the marine environmental impacts of Katrina is the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The site is fairly simple to navigate, as it essentially contains a number of links to some of the projects they are currently working on throughout the region. Some of these projects include assessments of the marine mammal and turtle health and monitoring the area for harmful algal blooms. Visitors may also wish to learn about the currently deployed vessels that are out working in the area, or they may also want to take a look at their links section. [KMG]

How to calculate hazardous materials exposure for older adults

EPA Releases Report on Development of an Exposure Factors Handbook for Aging

Older adults may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of environmental contaminants due to differential exposures arising from physiological and behavioral changes with age, as well as the body’s decreased capacity to defend against toxic stressors. To address these issues and discuss practical considerations of the utility of an Exposure Factors Handbook for the Aging in conducting exposure assessments, a panel of experts in the fields of exposure assessment, risk assessment, physiology, and behavioral science were convened at a national workshop in February of 2007. This report summarizes the discussions held during the workshop, highlights several sources of existing data, and provides recommendations for additional research. Panelists included national and international experts in the fields of gerontology, physiology, exposure assessment, and behavioral science.
The workshop panelists discussed practical issues related to evaluating and protecting against environmental health risks posed to older adults. A summary report of the workshop is now available online […]

http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/CFM/recordisplay.cfm?deid=171923

from Aging Initiative” Listserver! The “Aging_Initiativ” Listserver [sic] is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to raise awareness about the susceptibility of older persons to environmental hazards and to share information on strategies to reduce or prevent exposure. We use the listserver to send email to you, to let you know about important news and updated information.

see earlier, Aging and Toxic Response (EPA review)

Lead and Older Adults

Long-term lead exposure linked to cognitive decline in older adults

The Association between Blood Lead Levels and Osteoporosis among Adults – Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) Campbell JR, Auinger P. 2007. Environ Health Perspect: doi:10.1289/ehp.9716.

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