Search Results for 'long term'

Alaska Long Term Care Community Forum August 2008

Not exactly community-involvement but at least comments are possible on the draft.

[deadline]

Long Term Care Community Forum for Stakeholders of State Long Term Health Care Services and Supports [sic]

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) has hired HCBS Strategies Inc. to develop recommendations for improving the long term care services it provides to older adults and individuals with disabilities of all ages. As part of developing these recommendations we have obtained feedback from stakeholders such as consumers and their families, providers and direct care workers. We are holding Community Forums to gain reactions from stakeholders on our draft set of recommendations before they are finalized. All those interested may attend.

Individuals are welcome to participate in person or through a web-enabled conference call. Individuals must pre-register for webinars in advance! For those that have limited computer or internet access they may participate by phone only by using the conference call numbers listed below.

Dates/Locations:
Tuesday, August 26th from1:00 – 4:00pm: Downtown Anchorage Marriott- Anchorage/ Via Phone: (702) 824-9512 Access code: 224-977-617 Audio Pin: #

Wednesday, August 27th 5:00 – 8:00 pm: Centennial Hall Convention Center- Juneau /Via Phone: (702) 824-9512 Access code: 126-987-378 Audio Pin: #

Friday, August 29th 1:00 – 4:00pm: Westmark Fairbanks Hotel- Fairbanks Via Phone: (702) 824-9512 Access code: 177-724-278 Audio Pin: #

To for more information or to register for the Forum webinars please go to www.AKLTC.com
If you have questions please contact Kristy Michael with HCBS Strategies by e-mail Kristy AT hcbs DOT info or by phone: 410-858-0807


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IHS 2008 Long Term Care Grants

Subject: IHS 2008 Long Term Care Grants announcement
To: ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV
The 2008 Long Term Care Grants request for application has been published in the Federal Register. These are grants for $50,000 – 75,000 per year for two years to either plan or implement long term care services.
Key Dates May 2 for mandatory Letter of Intent.

The Letter of Intent does not obligate you to apply, but we cannot accept applications unless there has been a letter of intent to apply. So if you think you might apply, send in a letter of intent!

June 20 application deadline
A pdf of the Federal Register Announcement can be found at: http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2008/pdf/E8-6409.pdf

The application has not yet been posted but will be on www.Grants.gov using Funding Announcement Number: HHS–2008–IHS–EHC–0001 or CDFA number:93.933.

Bruce Finke, MD
IHS / Nashville Area Elder Health Consultant
Chronic Care Initiative
(413) 584-0790
(615) 417-4915 cell
http://www.ihs.gov/MedicalPrograms/ElderCare/index.asp

The AI/AN elder population is growing rapidly and the Al/AN population as a whole is aging. The prevalence of chronic disease in this population continues to increase, contributing to a frail elder population with increasing long-term care (LTC) needs.

LTC is best understood as an array of social and health care services that support an individual who has needs for assistance in activities of daily living over a prolonged period. LTC supports elders and their families with medical, personal, and social services delivered in a variety of settings to support quality of life, maximum function, and dignity.

While families continue to be the backbone of LTC for Al/AN elders, there is well documented need to support this care with formal services. The way these services and systems of care are developed and implemented can have a profound impact on the cultural and spiritual health of the community.

Home and community-based services have the potential for meeting the needs of the vast majority of elders requiring LTC services, supporting the key roles of the family in the care of the elder and the elder in the care of the family and community.


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Call for presentations AIAN Long Term Care conference

The 3rd Annual AIAN Long Term Care conference will be in Albuquerque, September 5-7, 2007. We’re still looking for presenters for IHS and Tribal Long Term Care programs. We are hoping once again to have travel stipends available for presenters through a grant from the Retirement Research Foundation.

Please take a minute and send in an abstract before April 30th [deadline] – we hope to select the presenters shortly after that deadline and offer invitations. This will give both Tribal and federal programs plenty of time to make their arrangements for travel.

Visit the conference website at http://www.aianlongtermcare.org. In addition to promising practices and model programs in LTC, we will have intensive daylong workshops on the PACE and Green House models of long term care.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Best regards, Bruce Bruce Finke, MD Acting Chief Medical Officer Nashville Area Indian Health Service IHS Elder Health Consultant, ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV
413-584-0790
615-727-2044 (cell)


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AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Honoring our Elders: Best Practices in Long Term Care

Come join us in Tulsa, Oklahoma in Honoring our Elders, Second Annual American Indian and Alaska Native Long Term Care Conference on September 18 & 19, 2006. [deadline]

Native Americans have strong family ties, traditions and a desire for independence. The rural environments where many Native Americans live are not conducive for traditional home health care models. (C. Jameson, 2006 Abstract)

This conference highlights best practices in long term care for American Indians and Alaska Natives, come and learn from the people that are making long term care work in urban and reservation communities for AI/AN Elders. Find out how to develop comprehensive services for Elders and the Disabled.

LTC Conference offers an opportunity to: form new partnerships; get new ideas; learn about Aging services and how to make it accessible for Elders; start a long term care program in your community; get family members together to plan for the well-being and safety of their Elders; or when Elders require care in urban settings due to proximity of hospitals, incorporating cultural practices and communication in the health care setting to alleviates homesickness, while assisting the Elder to become more accepting of the needed care.

The founding philosophy of the American Indian and Alaska Native Long Term Care Conference is: To honor our Elders, by learning from each other to successfully make long term care a reality in Indian Country.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers: Dr. Charles Grim, IHS Director, Ms. Carol Kelly, CMS, Chief Chad Smith, Cherokee Nation, Bill Thomas, Eden Alternative/Green House Project, Connie Bremner, Eagle Shield Senior Center,

Attend the virtual site visit for the Cherokee Nation s Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly, (PACE), Luncheon Network Sessions and much, much more.

For more conference information and registration materials please visit,

www.aianlongtermcare.org


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Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/bmj.38586.448704.E0v1?ecoll
BMJ, doi:10.1136/bmj.38586.448704.E0 (published 21 October 3005)

[But, why did early retirees retire early? feeling unwell?]

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population: prospective cohort study
Shan P Tsai 1*, Judy K Wendt 1, Robin P Donnelly 1, Geert de Jong 2, Farah S Ahmed 1

1 Shell Health Services, Shell Oil Company, 910 Louisiana, Houston, TX 77002, USA
2 Shell International, Hague, Netherlands
* Correspondence to: shan.tsaiAT shell DOT com

Objective To assess whether early retirement is associated with better survival.
Design Long term prospective cohort study.
Setting Petroleum and petrochemical industry, United States.
Subjects Past employees of Shell Oil who retired at ages 55, 60, and 65 between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 2003.
Main outcome measure Hazard ratio of death adjusted for sex, year of entry to study, and socioeconomic status.

Results Subjects who retired early at 55 and who were still alive at 65 had a significantly higher mortality than those who retired at 65 (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.73). Mortality was also significantly higher for subjects in the first 10 years after retirement at 55 compared with those who continued working (1.89, 1.58 to 2.27). After adjustment, mortality was similar between those who retired at 60 and those who retired at 65 (1.06, 0.92 to 1.22). Mortality did not differ for the first five years after retirement at 60 compared with continuing work at 60 (1.04, 0.82 to 1.31).

Conclusions Retiring early at 55 or 60 was not associated with better survival than retiring at 65 in a cohort of past employees of the petrochemical industry. Mortality was higher in employees who retired at 55 than in those who continued working.

(Accepted 16 August 2005)

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