Search Results for 'linguist'

Walter Soboleff, Tlingit linguist 1908-2011

2011-05-22
“Tlingit Elder Walter Soboleff Dies at 102” http://www.ktuu.com/ktuu-walter-soboleff-obituary-052211,0,4639306.story

Noted Tlingit elder Walter Soboleff dies from the Juneau Empire.

http://aprn.org/2011/05/23/tlingit-leader-walter-soboleff-passes-away/

2009-11-14 Celebrating 101 years Juneau Empire – Juneau,AK,USA
In the summer, he’d return to Alaska and work on the seine boats out of Sitka or the cold storage. The price of salmon then included humpies selling for 4 …
http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/111309/loc_516060703.shtml

2008-11-14 nonagenarian centenarian Tlingit linguist

Dr Soboleff was a main speaker at the Elders and Youth Conference and at AFN in Anchorage this year. Elders and Youth is the convention which precedes the statewide Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention. Soboleff is important in anthropological linguistics but better known for his contributions to Alaska as reverend, teacher, organizer, archivist.

Walter Soboleff, AFN 2008

1908 was the year that the 88 million Americans living at the time heard about a “ball” dropping in New York’s Time Square to celebrate the coming of a New Year; it was the first year that Americans would honor their mothers (Mother’s Day). Teddy Roosevelt was president, a postage stamp cost 2 cents, and Henry Ford was developing the Model T, which would sell for $850.
….
Kajakti, “One Slain in Battle,” was born November 14, 1908, to Alexander Ivan Soboleff, the son of a Russian Orthodox priest, and his wife, Anna Hunter of Killisnoo, Alaska. Kajakti (also spelled Kha’jaq’tii) was born into a world where his mother’s Tlingit culture was being forever changed by his father’s European one. He was named after an Angoon Clan leader to whom he was related.

As a 7 year old, Kajakti was taken to an Iicht (shaman) by his mother and was treated for reasons he never understood. He also experienced being sent to the “Russian school” in Sitka as an 8-year-old, only to be sent home again because it closed due to the overthrow of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, its benefactor (1917). A year later, the 10-year-old served as an interpreter for a doctor who visited Killisnoo during the 1918 flu epidemic that brought many Alaska Native tribes to the edge of extinction.

JUNEAU — More than 1,000 papers documenting Alaska Native history by Tlingit elder Walter Soboleff have been posted on the Internet by Sealaska Heritage Institute in what officials are calling a unique and priceless collection.

Running from 1929 to 1995, the documents provide insight into the Native land claims struggle and the Alaska Native Brotherhood, institute president Rosita Worl said. … “He begins at a real pivotal time in our history,” she said.

from APRN.org
Web Extra: Dr. Soboleff at 100 (extended version)

Tue, October 21, 2008 At the Elders and Youth gathering that precedes the AFN convention, First Alaskans Institute trustee Byron Mallot spoke about the incredible legacy of Tlingit elder Dr. Walter Soboleff. Soboleff will turn 100 years old in November and Mallot said introducing him was humbling. Here is an extended interview with Dr. Soboleff.

[revised 2008-11-14] The Anchorage Daily Newsreader provides additional links to his birthday celebration.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY-OLD NATIVE LEADER: The tributes continue for Walter Soboleff of Juneau – a Tlingit scholar and Presbyterian pastor – who turns 100 years old today, reports the Juneau Empire. In a speech Thursday at the Southeast Alaska Native Summit, Soboleff said that as white culture overtook Alaska, he “tried to take the best of both worlds.”

His son Ross Soboleff, 57, said that pluralist attitude was novel in his father’s time. “It certainly was presented to us, and to his generation, ‘The Native ways are old. We’ve got to put those aside and take on the new life.’ He was someone who pioneered the idea that, well, no, you don’t have to put those aside, those things are part of who you are. … I can make it in this greater society we live in, but I’m still a Native. Things that are part of our way of life have validity and value. Someone had to come up with that idea. This guy was one of the first to see that it’s possible – not just see that it was possible, but to actually do it.”

The article includes photos from Soboleff’s life. Soboleff gave a dramatic keynote speech at the Elders and Youth Conference last month in Anchorage. You can hear it at the Alaska Public Radio Network site. More than 1,000 papers by Soboleff documenting Alaska Native history are being archived by the Sealaska Heritage Institute. Many can be seen here.


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Esther Martinez, nonagenarian Tewa linguist, 2008 honor

For more on the remarkable Ms Martinez see the earlier post

Esther Martinez: ‘A way to honor her spirit’ Historical roadside marker celebrates Tewa linguist and renowned storyteller
11/8/2008 – 11/9/08
OHKAY OWINGEH — New Mexico honored Ohkay Owingeh storyteller and Tewa linguist Esther Martinez Blue Water (P’oe Tsáwä) on Saturday by unveiling a new roadside marker at the pueblo north of Española.

“It is an honor to have a marker that recognizes her contributions to her pueblo and to others,” said Martinez, speaking to the large crowd gathered at the site along N.M. 68. “She was a person steadfast to the end.”

The wooden marker is the second of 55 that will be installed around the state in recognition of influential New Mexico women. .. The marker program was conceived by three women — Pat French, Beverly Duran and Alexis Girard. They created the New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative and lobbied the Legislature to fund the project.

“As we drove around the state, we realized all the historic markers up and down the road were all for men,” French said Saturday as she waited for the cutting of a silver ribbon around Martinez’s marker. “This is to create a better balance.”

Martinez, born in 1912, was known as an exceptional storyteller. Her family said she could use almost anything as the source of a good yarn, even everyday events. “My mother’s stories had such life and character,” daughter Josephine Binford said with a chuckle. “You could see what she described. When she spoke, it was like she cast a spell.”

… Martinez received many national honors for her work in preserving the language and stories of her people. She taught Tewa in the Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan Pueblo) schools for years and created a Tewa dictionary. She traveled widely to share stories with non-Pueblo people. She received the Teacher of the Year award from the National Council of American Indians in 1997 and a year later was given the Governor’s Award for Excellence.

In 2006, Martinez was named a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts.


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Nonagenarian American Indian linguist

By DON PACE | Associated Press, August 28, 2006

LAS VEGAS, N.M. (AP) – Esther Martinez was born the year the Titanic sank and New Mexico became a state.

Her American Indian name is P’oe Tsawa, or Blue Water, the name her friends and family call her. Martinez, 94, is a renowned storyteller from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo. …

Binford said her mother has written many storybooks, wrote the Tewa dictionary which is still in use in Tewa speaking pueblos, and numerous curriculum guides for the bilingual education program.

Martinez will be honored with the National Heritage Fellowship Award in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 12 for her work in preserving the Tewa language.

Esther Martinez

Tragically, Ms Martinez was killed by a drunk driver on 16 September 2006, as she was driven home from the return flight from DC.

Esther Martinez was known for her career in education, which didn’t begin until she was in her 50s. A mother of 10, she served as Ohkay Owingeh’s Tewa instructor and director of bilingual education for more than 20 years.

…Among Blue Water’s many recognitions are a Living Treasure Award from the state of New Mexico, the Indian Educational Award for Teacher of the Year from the National Council of American Indians and the New Mexico Arts Commission Governor’s Award for excellence and achievement in the Arts…. She was a major conservator of the Tewa language, teaching her native language from 1974 to 1989 at schools in Ohkay Owingeh, formerly known as San Juan Pueblo. …She also helped translate the New Testament of the Bible into Tewa and compiled Tewa dictionaries for pueblos that have distinct dialects of the language, the NEA said.

Since 1988, Esther Martinez told her stories in English to non-Tewa audiences through Storytelling International.

More recently, she was presented an honorary Bachelor of Arts in early education by Northern Community College in Espanola….

For more background on Martinez, check out the following link:

Also, an audio version of stories can be found at the National Endowment for the Arts website:


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Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

Pablita Velarde exhibition

Ms Velarde’s work, like Ms Martinez’
https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/09/18/american-indian-linguist/ remained controversial even late into their lives for many people [a sign of living tradition].

David Collins | For The New Mexican, February 19, 2007

A yearlong exhibition that opened Sunday at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture memorializes Santa Clara Pueblo artist Pablita Velarde the way she wanted to be remembered.

“I want the Earth to remember me through my works,” Velarde says in a DVD presentation that offers museum guests a posthumous first-person explanation of her work.

A collection of 58 paintings from the 84 works that Bandelier National Monument officials commissioned Velarde to produce between 1939 and 1945 went on display on Museum Hill. The collection is recognized as a premiere documentation of Pueblo life at that time. …

“It was because of the WPA that many artistic traditions survive today,” museum director Shelby Tisdale said.

Born in 1918 at Santa Clara as Tse Tsan, or “Golden Dawn,” Velarde’s father sent her to St. Catherine Indian School in Santa Fe when she was 5. In the eighth grade, she transferred to Santa Fe Indian School. There, she studied with Dunn, who was renowned for training a generation of American Indians for careers in art.

At the Cerrillos Road school, Velarde’s art developed in a direction that defied tradition, even as she documented and interpreted the traditions she learned from elders. …

Velarde’s work for Bandelier includes traditional motifs but relies on illustration styles and materials typical of the era. Later in her life, Velarde experimented with natural media until she perfected her own rendition of media used in ancient petroglyphs. Velarde called them earth pigments.

By her own account, Velarde battled a stigma as a woman working in a medium traditionally reserved for men until 1953, when she became the first woman to receive the prestigious Grand Purchase Award from the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Okla.

Tisdale said the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture started negotiating an exhibit of Velarde’s work for the Bandelier monument a few months before her death Jan. 10, 2006, at age 87.


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