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New international consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation

American Heart Association emergency cardiovascular care guidelines 2005 are now available here, offering lay rescuers and healthcare providers recommendations for treating cardiovascular emergencies. The importance of effective chest compressions also is stressed.

The European guidelines have been adopted by the Resuscitation Council (UK) without modification (www.resus.org.uk).

The Resuscitation Council (UK) now recommends:

For adults:

* CPR with a chest compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2
* no initial ventilations before starting compressions
* when professional help is delayed for more than 4-5 minutes, one option is to give compressions for up to three minutes before attempting defibrillation
* compressions for two minutes after defibrillation
* if coordinated rhythm is not restored by defibrillation, second and further shocks should be given only after additional cycles of chest compressions

For children:

* solo lay rescuers should give CPR with a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2
* two rescuers (usually healthcare professionals) should use a ratio of 15:2

For neonates:

? will almost certainly be anoxic, so still need a ratio of 3:1″

Help Age International

A significant resource.

www.helpage.org/
Welcome to HelpAge International

…a global network of not-for-profit organisations with a mission to work with and for disadvantaged older people worldwide to achieve a lasting improvement in the quality of their lives.

New elderblog available

New to me, at least. WordPress.com now has options for the corporate server to add links to other websites that it thinks may be relevant to a particular post. We bloggers have no control over what those links are, except to turn them off. However, an incoming visitor to here came from a linked web log that is interesting. Check it out. Global Ageing Network Blog http://iahsa.wordpress.com/

The International Association of Homes and Services for the Ageing, http://www.iahsa.net IAHSA is an NGO in Special Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations.
2519 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20008-1520
iahsa/AT/aahsa/DOT/org
Phone (202) 508-9468
Fax (202) 220-0041

IAHSA is an affiliate of AAHSA American Association of Homes and Services for the Ageing


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Nonagenarian autobiographies

Ruth Gruber, woman of letters, tells her own story.
The Truro Daily News

Witness: One of the Great Correspondents of the 20th Century Tells Her Story by Ruth Gruber

With her perfect memory (and plenty of zip), 95-year-old Ruth Gruber – adventurer, international correspondent, photographer, maker of (and witness to) history, responsible for rescuing hundreds of thousands of Jewish refugees during the Second War II and after – tells her story in her own words and photographs.

Gruber’s life has been extraordinary and extraordinarily heroic. She received a B.A. from New York University in three years, a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin a year later, and a Ph.D. from the University of Cologne (magna cum laude) one year after that, becoming at age 20 the youngest Ph.D. in the world (it made headlines in The New York Times; the subject of her thesis: the then little-known Virginia Woolf).

At 24, Gruber became an international correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune and travelled across the Soviet Arctic, scooping the world and witnessing, firsthand, the building of cities in the Siberian gulag by the pioneers and prisoners Stalin didn’t execute … and when she was 33, Ickes assigned another secret mission to her – one that transformed her life: Gruber escorted 1,000 Holocaust survivors from Italy to America, the only Jews given refuge in this country during the war. […]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Somewhere Towards the End by Diana Athill 192pp, Granta Books, £12.99

http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2239306,00.html
It’s a relief to find an amusing look at getting old, says Katharine Whitehorn
Saturday January 12, 2008, The Guardian

Diana Athill is 90 and has almost no regrets, despite having lived a life which most women of her class and era might have thought regrettable in the extreme.

And she still thinks so; that’s the joy of it. Although she sees with grim clarity the drawbacks and horrors of old age, illness, death, what comes across most is her acceptance and interested curiosity about the condition. She knows she has to be a carer for Barry, who has become diabetic and has other health problems and won’t control his diet. She dislikes being a carer very much and grumpily asks herself: “If a life so severely diminished is shortened by eating doughnuts what will it matter?” But she accepts it.

From The Times, January 11, 2008
Reflections on the gravity of growing older, Jane Shilling
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/jane_shilling/article3166519.ece
I’ve just been reading Somewhere Towards the End, Diana Athill’s memoir of old age

From The Times, http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article3168331.ece

January 11, 2008
Sleepwalking into a crabbit old age– What are we doing introducing more health screening to allow us to live even longer? Valerie Grove

As Jane Shilling wrote, reviewing Somewhere Towards the End, by 90-year-old Diana Athill, Athill is cheered that women in her family “make old bones and good deaths”. But there is a chilly coda to this. Athill looked after her own dying mother.

…Athill has observed that good deaths tend to require the presence not merely of the principal actor, who is too busy dying to take charge of the manner of his or her demise, but also a producer and director, in the person of a daughter.

“But I have no daughter… And I haven’t got the money to pay for care of any kind. If I don’t have the luck to fall down dead while still able-bodied, it will be the geriatric ward for me.”

Even her redoubtable mind shrinks from this. “Fortunately, if a prospect is bleak enough, the mind jibs at dwelling on it,” she stoically adds.

We all jib at it: but for most the geriatric ward is the reality,

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2008/01/11/boath106.xml

Paul Tibbets, nonagenarian

Reuters | Friday, 2 November 2007
Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the US bomber that dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan on Aug 6, 1945, died on Thursday at age 92, a newspaper reported.

Tibbets, who died at his home in Columbus, Ohio, had suffered strokes and was ill from heart failure, the Columbus Dispatch said in its online edition.

An experienced pilot who had flown some of the first bombing missions over Germany during World War 2, Tibbets was a 30-year-old colonel commanding the Enola Gay, a B-29 Superfortress bomber named for his mother <http://www.stuff.co.nz/4259151a12.html

Pilot Who Dropped A-Bomb on Hiroshima Dead at Age 92 – Cleveland Leader

and others,
http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/story/0,,2203557,00.html

General Paul Tibbets, pilot of the Enola Gay, dies at 92International Herald Tribune
Hiroshima bomb pilot dies aged 92BBC News
Hiroshima bomber dies at 92 TV3 News
Bloomberg

all 292 news articles

Tibbets was just the pilot, but certainly a more approachable person than the massive Manhattan Project. Unfortunately, the Hiroshima airdrop has to be put into the historical context of the Tokyo air raids and the Dresden air raids, as well as the Bataan campaign, Nankin, the Aleutians, etc. No wonder the 20th century experienced the worst mass disasters, maybe even given the smaller world population of earlier times, such as the Black Death. Maybe excepting whatever the Africa bottleneck was that supposedly reduced all humankind to just a handful of mothers.


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