Search Results for 'insurance'

Another resource for in-situ eldercare

I ran across this link from the state’s health and human services department. Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about it. The parent website isn’t helpful. It sounds like a health payment manager of some sort; sort of a personal Medicaid manager, maybe, authorized under contract to the state. It would certainly be a useful role for families or individuals looking for individual home health care. It doesn’t sound like it is an employer. It might be useful if a family member wishes to become a caregiver and receive Medicaid or insurance coverage for that service. I know there are other programs to train family members as caregivers (can’t remember the specific programs, sorry. However, the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. once had training for personal care attendants, PCA)

The company homepage is almost no help.

“CDPC performs fiscal intermediary functions for the Consumer, including processing time sheets, billing Medicaid, and caregiver payroll. CDPC provides training for the Consumer and resources for caregiver training and also assists the Consumer in maintaining program compliance.”

The Arizona program description is a bit more helpful–

“What is Consumer-Directed Personal Care?
Consumer-Directed Care is available to individuals who need attendant care services in their home. Self-Directed care puts you in control, allowing you to arrange and direct your own services. You select, train and manage your caregiver who may be a trusted friend, neighbor or relative. Individuals must be capable of directing their own services or arranging for a representative to act on their behalf.”

Contact info for the Alaska program is http://www.consumerdirectonline.net/alaska/ Anyone have any experience with this group?

Invited by the state in 2001 to help develop the Consumer Directed Personal Care Services Program, we are proud to be part of communities across the state of Alaska by supporting and promoting self-directed personal care services. The program is specifically intended to allow individuals with health care needs to remain in their homes and communities avoiding placement in an institution. This program is designed for individuals who are capable of directing their own personal care services or appointing a Personal Representative to act on their behalf.

Alaska program requirements include:
* Eligibility for Alaska Medicaid
* The need for assistance with activities of daily
living such as:
– medication reminders – transfers
– bathing & hygiene – dressing & grooming
– ambulation – eating
– toileting, bowel & bladder care
* Authorization by a health care professional that assistance is necessary
* Completion of an assessment for placement in the program
* There is no age requirement in the state of Alaska

Contact a program coordinator at:
Anchorage
The Emerald Building
615 East 82nd Ave, Suite 101
Anchorage, AK 99518
Phone: (907) 222-2652
Toll free: 1- 888 – 966-8777
Fax: (907) 677-8777
infoAK AT ConsumerDirectOnline DOT net

Wasilla
Kenai
Kodiak


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Liz Taylor takes comments

One of the best reads ever on aging deliberately is Liz Taylor–
Her series has been mentioned previously –

I just discovered that the columns published at Kitsap Sun Stories: Liz Taylor: Aging Deliberately allow comments (registration required) and have an RSS feed . This is so much more convenient and useful than the Seattle Times venue. I’m not sure which is the primary home for Liz’s work, however, and Kitsap may not carry all her columns. At the Seattle Times I have to subscribe by E-mail to their health series (once a week e-mail, all health stories which are interesting) to get notice of her columns. Otherwise I have a Google News Alert for Liz Taylor+ aging, which sometimes brings in notice of National Velvet. [the colors behind some items below mean nothing except straightening out the code remains to be done.]

Liz Taylor began her career as a federal consumer-fraud investigator and was appointed by Elizabeth Dole in 1976 to direct a nationwide investigation of the nursing-home industry. She’s worked in the aging field ever since.

In the 1980s, Liz became one of the first geriatric care managers in the Pacific Northwest, working with thousands of families and older adults to find high-quality services. In 2000, she founded Aging Deliberately, a business that teaches people how to prepare for their aging so they’ll have more control over what happens to them. In 2005, she served as a delegate to the White House Conference on Aging. She’s won the American Geriatrics Society’s 2007 Aging Awareness Media Award and the Washington Association of Homes and Services for the Aging’s Excellence in Media Award. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/growingolder/

It’s relatively easy to age successfully if you’re wealthy. Money can’t buy happiness, but it certainly allows you to buy the things that make life more comfortable at any age. 1/26/2008 11:00 PM
In my last column, I wrote about a growing problem: what to do when an older person who has dementia hasn’t named anyone she trusts to make decisions for her. This week I’ll tackle a tougher issue: what to do when the person she names does a poor job. 11/17/2007 11:00 PM
My e-mail has had a repeated theme recently: An older person with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, isn’t paying bills, preparing meals, bathing, and other important tasks — but refuses to allow anyone to help.
11/3/2007 09:00 PM |
There’s a certain uniformity to finding a physician under Medicare these days. Rich or poor, if you’re 65 or older, you’re likely to have similar slim pickings (more so if you’re poor and on Medicare and Medicaid). 10/20/2007 11:00 PM |
Most of us want to live a long time, but nobody wants to grow old. The irony is, most of us will — live a long time and grow old. It’s easy to do — all it takes is letting the days roll by. As long as you’re healthy, getting old is a piece of cake.
10/6/2007 11:00 PM |
It’s easy as pie to age well when you’re healthy. The friction comes when you become frail. Sometimes it’s self-inflicted, the product of isolation, poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and falls — all common problems for people who age in their homes but don’t plan it correctly. 9/22/2007 11:00 PM |
A woman in her late 70s, a good friend, is pondering her options. Her home is two stories (or three, including the basement), with many stairs to her bedroom, bathroom and the washing machine. 9/8/2007 11:00 PM
Dad is 87, fun and funny, with moderate dementia. He lived “on the edge” in his own home for years while we kids worried sick. 7/28/2007 11:00 PM
When I was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, cars were sort of round and later sort of square. My dad wore a hat to work and took the bus.
7/14/2007 11:00 PM
I’m 75 and have lived in an assisted-living facility for a year.
7/8/2007 02:00 AM
Older people are not simply younger people with wrinkles our bodies change dramatically as we age, both inside and out; some parts wear out before others, sometimes several at once.
6/17/2007 02:00 AM
Whether you live at home, in a retirement community, or in a yurt on top of a mountain, as you age, you want to do it consciously.
6/3/2007 02:00 AM

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Long-term nursing care in Alaska

Alaskans pay the most for long-term nursing home care

SURVEY: Insurer says average of $388 a day is highest in the nation.
November 21, 2006

Aging Alaskans and their families are paying the highest nursing home rates in the country, according to a study by New York Life Insurance Co. Nursing home costs average $388 a day in Alaska. In New York City, by comparison, the average cost of long-term care is $311 a day, according to the insurance survey.

Alaska has a total of 15 long-term care, or nursing homes

Many of the growing number of Alaska residents who need assistance as they age could get similar care at home and pay less, said Margaret Andrews, deputy director of the Center for Community…

CFC is a state-wide provider of home and community-based services for people with disabilities, the elderly and others who experience barriers to community living in Alaska. They have offices in Anchorage, Sitka, Fairbanks, Ketchikan, Juneau

ID theft in medical records

It is likely you may have heard of break-ins to personal data sets, such as the veterans affairs in the US or various banks or universities. In the US, at least, there are frequent TV ads about identity theft, including the two older women who end up buying tricked out motorcycles without their consent.

This LA Times article points out another, possibly deadlier, version of ID theft.

I know it doesn’t even require a theft to have errors in the health system. Our regional health monopoly frequently charges insurance companies (and therefore patients for the remaining excess charges) for treatment never received or for unneccessary procedures. Protests to billing doesn’t clear the charges. The bills are sent out to a collection agency. Protests to the insurance company don’t work; it is cheaper for them simply to process the charges. There is no internal checking mechanism because all charges not billed to insurance are eventually paid by the Federal government as part of their trust responsibility. There is no third party recourse in rural or frontier areas.

  • But until I read this article, I had no idea that erroneous medical information, not just the billing problems, would get passed along. This is truly scary.

The problem of access to one’s medical records predates the HIPAA legislation. Doctors and hospitals have felt patients are unable to understand their records so refused to allow individuals to see their records. I have had a couple of doctors seize X-rays and letters from other physicians, “for my records”, and not return them to me. I had let the doctor see the records for their assistance in my health.

On the other hand I have had excellent primary care physicians who would copy my file for me, when I needed to transfer to another place. Regrettably, there seem to be fewer and fewer instances of genuine medical partnership.

ID Theft Infects Medical Records
Victims face bogus bills and risk injury or death. Privacy laws make such fraud hard to pursue.
By Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer, September 25, 2006

To guard against identity theft, patients should:

• Ask to see their medical files from each provider on a regular basis;
• Scan medical and insurance bills for services, medicine and equipment they didn’t receive;
• Demand an annual list from their health insurance company of benefits that have been provided.

If medical records have been compromised:

• Ask the healthcare providers to delete the incorrect information and contact everyone they have shared that information with, as required by the health insurance act;
• Ask the providers for a list of those recipients, and follow up with them;
• Clean up records with the health insurer and make sure the provider has not passed along improper benefit reports to insurance databases;
• Scrutinize credit reports for unpaid medical bills;
• File a police report;
• Contact the Federal Trade Commission and state health and insurance departments.


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nesting in place

Liz Taylor’s articles are linked on the sidebar. She practices aging in place, too.

By Rebecca Teagarden

LIZ TAYLOR IS a specialist in matters of aging and long-term care…. “Let’s talk about what the boomers need to think about as 77 million of us grow old — in a society that’s not at all prepared,” she says.

“It’s not one thing, but a combination — and more attitude and planning than architectural. When I see older people moving into two- and three-story humongous houses all around me, I think living on one level is probably the most important thing you can do to age in place.

“That, and exercise!”

… I’m almost ready for the rest of my life.”

“Almost” means Taylor wants to make her property available to friends, perhaps building two or three more small houses there so the group can care for each other or possibly share a caregiver.

Taylor would offer part of her house, either the main house or the B&B suite, to the caregiver. She hopes that attractive housing will attract more caregiving candidates. To pay for the help, Taylor bought long-term-care insurance seven years ago. She also serves on an island task force planning for Bainbridge’s growth over the next 20 years. She is working to change island zoning and sewer ordinances to permit such huddled housing….

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