Search Results for 'gerontology'

Supercentenarians January 2009

Ms Baines is featured in the LATimes article, Gertrude Baines may be 114, but she’s not counting

http://www.latimes.com/news/local January 11, 2009 Oldest on Earth
1. Gertrude Baines, 114, Los Angeles; born April 6, 1894
2. Beatrice Farve, 113, Georgia; April 30, 1895
3. Kama Chinen, 113, Japan; May 10, 1895
4. Mary Josephine Ray, 113, New Hampshire; May 17, 1895
5. Olivia Patricia Thomas, 113, New York; June 29, 1895
6. Neva Morris, 113, Iowa; Aug. 3, 1895
7. Chiyo Shiraishi, 113, Japan; Aug. 6, 1895
8. Tomoji Tanabe, 113, Japan; Sept. 18, 1895 9. Maggie Renfro, 113, Louisiana; Nov. 14, 1895 10. Yoshino Ide, 113, Japan; Jan. 1, 1896
Source: Inglewood-based Gerontology Research Group


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Older, more able

This is an interesting summary of trends in aging in the US. Part of the reason for less disabling aging is the involvement of people in their medical and health decisions [see also Preventive health care in elderly people needs rethinking], technology (from microwave ovens to walkers), smokers died before now and quitters started quitting awhile ago, availability of surgery from eyes to knees, older people exercise more than in the past, changes in attitude towards aging capabilities (changing expectataions of older people by older people and others. Off those rockers!), better availability of foods, etc.

Frank Greve of McClatchy Newspapers says, “The remarkable thing about National Public Radio senior news analyst Daniel Schorr, 91, who only recently gave up tennis, and Landrum Bolling, 94, the globe-trotting director at large for the relief agency Mercy Corps, is the same: They aren’t as remarkable as you’d think they are.

A surprising decline in disability rates among older Americans since the 1980s is enabling millions more to lead longer, richer, spryer lives. … older Americans typically are disability-free for the roughly 10 months of life expectancy that were added from 1992 to 2003.

…According to Dr. Eileen Crimmins, a professor of gerontology and sociology at the University of Southern California, 25 percent of Hispanic and black Americans older than 65 need help with basic tasks. For whites, the rate is 17 percent. Differences in disability rates linked to income and education also persist, Crimmins and others have found, and while women live longer than men, they endure more disabilities. […]

Growing Older May Be Getting Easier, Tuesday 11 December 2007

http://www.truthout.org/issues_06/121107HB.shtml


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Tolstoy’s Bicyclist nonagenarian George Dawson and brain fitness

“Some people say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” Edwards said. “So I always like to mention George Dawson. He died a couple of years ago at age 102 or 103. What’s remarkable about George Dawson is that he learned to read at age 98.”

Dawson, of Texas, who was the grandson of slaves, then collaborated with co-author Richard Glaubman to write his autobiography, “Life is So Good,”‘ published in 2000 by Random House.

2011-05-28 Oprah recently posted this video about Mr Dawson’s legacy, George Dawson’s Legacy May 13, 2011

According to this entry, Mr Dawson published his first book at 102 years.

African American Read-In has a more detailed biography, “George Dawson also received two Doctorates of Humane letters from Texas Weslyan University and New School of New York City. In 2002, George Dawson Middle School was named in his honor in Southlake, Texas.” Click the photo to visit. George Dawson reading at 102

Mr Dawson’s accomplishments came up in a news summary of what the latest studies say about retaining or improving mental agility (caffeine in women. not men, is another finding). The summary is pretty good about the types of “neurobics” (stupid term, IMO) which are recommended more and more frequently. They also note the relationship between physical exercise and mental ability, “The general concept is: what’s good for your heart is good for your brain,” Mirza said.

In Bethel, they will probably just hide another jigsaw piece I hear they still won’t let the elderlies run the place.

Work your way to brain fitness
Posted by Linda S. Mah/Gazette August 21, 2007 17:14PM

…Physical exercise, social involvement, challenging activities and new experiences are all recommended as ways to help keep our brains in top-notch condition.

“The analogy may be trite, but the brain is like a muscle,” said Morry Edwards, a licensed clinical psychologist with Neuropsychology Associates in Kalamazoo. “The circuits strengthen when you use your brain. If you don’t, the circuits fade.”…

“Some more-recent research shows it’s not just the exercise but the type of exercise or variety of exercise that you do which is important,” Mirza said.
[…]

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Preventive health care in elderly people needs rethinking

This sounds like it could be an interesting think-piece. Unfortunately, BMJ no longer gives free access to articles the first year. [this article was subsequently made available to the public for discussion.]

I don’t know what they mean by elderly, the oldest olds? The age group was 70-82. See comments.

BMJ 2007;335:285-287 (11 August), doi:10.1136/bmj.39241.630741.BE1
Analysis by
Dee Mangin, senior lecturer in general practice1, Kieran Sweeney, honorary clinical senior lecturer in general practice2, Iona Heath, general practitioner3

1 Christchurch School of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch New Zealand, 2 Peninsula Medical School, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter EX2 5DW, 3 Caversham Group Practice, London NW5 2UP

Dee Mangin, Kieran Sweeney, and Iona Heath argue that, rather than prolonging life, preventive treatments in elderly people simply change the cause of death—the manner of our dying

The first 150 words of the full text of this article appear below.

Summary points

* Single disease models should not be applied to preventive treatments in elderly people
* Preventive treatments in elderly people may select cause of death without the patient’s informed consent
* Preventive use of statins shows no overall benefit in elderly people as cardiovascular mortality and morbidity are replaced by cancer
* A more sophisticated model is needed to assess the benefits and harms of preventive treatment in elderly people

Preventive health care aims to delay the onset of illness and disease and to prevent untimely and premature deaths. But the theory and rhetoric of prevention do not deal with the problem of how such health care applies to people who have already exceeded an average lifespan. In recent years, concerns about equity of access to treatments have focused on ageism. As a result, preventive interventions are encouraged regardless of age, and this can be harmful to the patient and expensive for the health . . .

[Full text of this article via paid subscription only] The full text is now available.
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/335/7614/285?etoc

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How to calculate hazardous materials exposure for older adults

EPA Releases Report on Development of an Exposure Factors Handbook for Aging

Older adults may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of environmental contaminants due to differential exposures arising from physiological and behavioral changes with age, as well as the body’s decreased capacity to defend against toxic stressors. To address these issues and discuss practical considerations of the utility of an Exposure Factors Handbook for the Aging in conducting exposure assessments, a panel of experts in the fields of exposure assessment, risk assessment, physiology, and behavioral science were convened at a national workshop in February of 2007. This report summarizes the discussions held during the workshop, highlights several sources of existing data, and provides recommendations for additional research. Panelists included national and international experts in the fields of gerontology, physiology, exposure assessment, and behavioral science.
The workshop panelists discussed practical issues related to evaluating and protecting against environmental health risks posed to older adults. A summary report of the workshop is now available online […]

http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/CFM/recordisplay.cfm?deid=171923

from Aging Initiative” Listserver! The “Aging_Initiativ” Listserver [sic] is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to raise awareness about the susceptibility of older persons to environmental hazards and to share information on strategies to reduce or prevent exposure. We use the listserver to send email to you, to let you know about important news and updated information.

see earlier, Aging and Toxic Response (EPA review)

Lead and Older Adults

Long-term lead exposure linked to cognitive decline in older adults

The Association between Blood Lead Levels and Osteoporosis among Adults – Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) Campbell JR, Auinger P. 2007. Environ Health Perspect: doi:10.1289/ehp.9716.

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