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Summer 2008 New Mexico Geriatric Institute

from ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV– 2008-04-25 mentioned earlier, I see. So this becomes a reminder 😉

https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=486
Information below about the New Mexico Geriatric Summer Institute – a favorite course of many over the years, with no registration fees for Indian Health professionals.
Bruce Finke, MD
IHS / Nashville Area Elder Health Consultant
Chronic Care Initiative
(413) 584-0790

[deadline] June 19-21, 2008 Summer 2008 Geriatric Institute The New Mexico Geriatric Education Center (NMGEC) is pleased to announce the Summer 2008 Geriatric Institute to be held on June 19-21, 2008, at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center, 2500 Carlisle Blvd. NE, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with CME/CEUs offered. The title this year is Better Outcomes, Healthier Elders: Collaboration in Management of Chronic Disease. The last half day of the Institute will be on Health Literacy which can be applied toward a Certificate in Health Literacy of 25 credit hours. Additional sessions for the certificate will be announced soon.

Tuition waivers will be available to Tribal and Indian Health Service health care professionals to attend the Summer Geriatric Institute.

Please visit the NMGEC website at http://hsc.unm.edu/som/fcm/gec for more information on upcoming events. If you should require additional assistance, you can reach
Cly Clytemnestra Davison, Program Coordinator cdavison AT saludDOTunmDOTedu New Mexico Geriatric Education Center UNM Health Sciences Center, Dept. FCM MSC09 5040
1001 Medical Arts Ave NE, Room 244 Albuquerque, NM 87102-2708
505-272-4934 phone
505-272-4962 fax


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Geriatric Summer Institute 2008

ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV

deadline June 19 – 21, 2008

The New Mexico Geriatric Education Center was re-funded this past year and will resume their highly popular Geriatric Summer Institute as well as an interdisciplinary geriatric certificate program. These programs are targeted to Indian Country. See below for details.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The University of New Mexico Geriatric Education Center (NMGEC) is happy to announce a grant award from HRSA Bureau of Health Professions through 2010. NMGEC has been funded for the past 17 years by a HRSA grant in five-year cycles (latest cycle 2001-2006). Thanks to everyone for the letters and support during the period of Congressional budget cuts.

Under the grant goals, the NMGEC provides geriatric continuing education and training to health care professionals with an emphasis on providers in Tribal and Indian Health Service clinics. NMGEC education and training programs concentrate on fostering an appreciation of the richness of Indian culture and traditions, and an awareness of the use of traditional healing practices. In the past five years, the NMGEC has trained over 3,800 interdisciplinary health care professionals and paraprofessionals on elder care in culturally appropriate geriatric educational workshops, trainings and collaborations.

The NMGEC is please to announce the return of training and educational offerings. The Summer Geriatric Institute will be taking place in Albuquerque on June 19 – 21, 2008, with CME/CEUs offered. The title this year is Better Outcomes, Healthier Elders: Collaboration in Management of Chronic Disease. The last half day of the Institute will be on Health Literacy which can be applied toward a Certificate in Health Literacy of 25 credit hours. Additional sessions for the certificate will be announced soon.

Tuition waivers will be available to Tribal and Indian Health Service health care professionals to attend the Summer Geriatric Institute, please call NMGEC at 505-272-4934 for waiver request application. A reduced fee of $100 is available for CHRs wishing to attend.

The Interdisciplinary Geriatric Certificate Program (40 credit hours) will resume this year with four Saturday sessions. The first session will start March 29, 2008 with following sessions on July 12, September 27 and November 15. The Interdisciplinary Geriatric Certificate Program is for all health care professions with an interest in Geriatrics. The certificate requires 20 hours of core courses in geriatrics and 20 hours of elective courses/workshops to complete the program. Four sessions of core courses (20 hrs) will be offered in Spring and Fall 2008 and will repeat each year with CME and CEUs available.

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

American Academy of Nursing Seeks Applications for Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards Program

Deadline: January 9, 2007

The John A. Hartford Foundation (http://www.jhartfound.org/) recognizes the centrality of nurses to the care of older adults. In 2000, and in partnership with the American Academy of Nursing (http://www.aannet.org/ ), JAHF launched a multi-million-dollar Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Scholars Award Program to produce expert researchers, academicians, and practitioners who will lead the field of gerontology nursing and ultimately improve the care of the elderly. The program includes the distinguished Scholar & Fellow Awards Program.

The Scholar & Fellow Awards Program seeks applicants for the following scholarships and fellowships:

The Predoctoral Scholarship program is designed to support two years of doctoral work for nurses committed to careers in academic geriatric nursing. The program offers support at the
level of $30,000 in stipend and up to $20,000 in tuition and fee support for each of two years.

The Masters in Business Administration Scholarship program is designed to support one year of work toward a Masters in Business Administration or related degree. The program provides a total of $50,000 in support.

The Postdoctoral Fellowship program provides $60,000 of support for each of two years of advanced research training and mentorship designed to assist doctorally prepared nurses
committed to faculty careers in geriatric nursing.

The Mayday Fund provides an additional $5,000 award to selected candidates whose research includes the study of pain in the elderly.

Visit the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Web site for complete program guidelines and application information.

RFP Link:

http://fconline.foundationcenter.org/pnd/10003411/geriatricnursing

For additional RFPs in Aging, visit:

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/rfp/cat_aging.jhtml


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Geriatric care managers

Geriatric care managers work privately with older adults and their families to create a plan of care that meets the needs of the older adult. They will meet with you to help you understand your loved one’s needs and to learn what resources and options are available to meet those needs.
http://www.caremanager.org/index.cfm

Liz Taylor takes comments

One of the best reads ever on aging deliberately is Liz Taylor–
Her series has been mentioned previously –

I just discovered that the columns published at Kitsap Sun Stories: Liz Taylor: Aging Deliberately allow comments (registration required) and have an RSS feed . This is so much more convenient and useful than the Seattle Times venue. I’m not sure which is the primary home for Liz’s work, however, and Kitsap may not carry all her columns. At the Seattle Times I have to subscribe by E-mail to their health series (once a week e-mail, all health stories which are interesting) to get notice of her columns. Otherwise I have a Google News Alert for Liz Taylor+ aging, which sometimes brings in notice of National Velvet. [the colors behind some items below mean nothing except straightening out the code remains to be done.]

Liz Taylor began her career as a federal consumer-fraud investigator and was appointed by Elizabeth Dole in 1976 to direct a nationwide investigation of the nursing-home industry. She’s worked in the aging field ever since.

In the 1980s, Liz became one of the first geriatric care managers in the Pacific Northwest, working with thousands of families and older adults to find high-quality services. In 2000, she founded Aging Deliberately, a business that teaches people how to prepare for their aging so they’ll have more control over what happens to them. In 2005, she served as a delegate to the White House Conference on Aging. She’s won the American Geriatrics Society’s 2007 Aging Awareness Media Award and the Washington Association of Homes and Services for the Aging’s Excellence in Media Award. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/growingolder/

It’s relatively easy to age successfully if you’re wealthy. Money can’t buy happiness, but it certainly allows you to buy the things that make life more comfortable at any age. 1/26/2008 11:00 PM
In my last column, I wrote about a growing problem: what to do when an older person who has dementia hasn’t named anyone she trusts to make decisions for her. This week I’ll tackle a tougher issue: what to do when the person she names does a poor job. 11/17/2007 11:00 PM
My e-mail has had a repeated theme recently: An older person with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, isn’t paying bills, preparing meals, bathing, and other important tasks — but refuses to allow anyone to help.
11/3/2007 09:00 PM |
There’s a certain uniformity to finding a physician under Medicare these days. Rich or poor, if you’re 65 or older, you’re likely to have similar slim pickings (more so if you’re poor and on Medicare and Medicaid). 10/20/2007 11:00 PM |
Most of us want to live a long time, but nobody wants to grow old. The irony is, most of us will — live a long time and grow old. It’s easy to do — all it takes is letting the days roll by. As long as you’re healthy, getting old is a piece of cake.
10/6/2007 11:00 PM |
It’s easy as pie to age well when you’re healthy. The friction comes when you become frail. Sometimes it’s self-inflicted, the product of isolation, poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and falls — all common problems for people who age in their homes but don’t plan it correctly. 9/22/2007 11:00 PM |
A woman in her late 70s, a good friend, is pondering her options. Her home is two stories (or three, including the basement), with many stairs to her bedroom, bathroom and the washing machine. 9/8/2007 11:00 PM
Dad is 87, fun and funny, with moderate dementia. He lived “on the edge” in his own home for years while we kids worried sick. 7/28/2007 11:00 PM
When I was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, cars were sort of round and later sort of square. My dad wore a hat to work and took the bus.
7/14/2007 11:00 PM
I’m 75 and have lived in an assisted-living facility for a year.
7/8/2007 02:00 AM
Older people are not simply younger people with wrinkles our bodies change dramatically as we age, both inside and out; some parts wear out before others, sometimes several at once.
6/17/2007 02:00 AM
Whether you live at home, in a retirement community, or in a yurt on top of a mountain, as you age, you want to do it consciously.
6/3/2007 02:00 AM

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