Search Results for 'furniture'

furniture [ES&H]

We need furniture which fits the adults in Bethel and isn’t too soft or ill-fitting. Too soft furniture does cause muscle, ligament, and bone injuires as people struggle to get out of the chair or couch. Ideally, we can design our own, we certainly have the skills locally.

[see additional information and resources in the comments section for this post.]

Advertisements

ES&H Avoid dangerous furniture design principles

ES&H Avoid dangerous furniture design principles

I’m having trouble locating design principles or guidelines for making, modifying, or buying furniture suitable to the elderly and frail.

Like many senior centers in rural areas, I’m sure furniture for elders is usually castoffs. (We have an especially niggardly program) But furniture of the wrong design can be dangerous, contributing to fractures, vessel and muscle injuries, stroke, etc.

We also have a population of people of genetically short-stature, unique physique (not average Euro-American) people for whom the typical furniture is not appropriate.

So, if people want to purchase, modify, or build ourselves furniture, what guidelines should we follow?

Thank you.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 10:44:35 -0500
From: ABLEDATA Resource Center on Accessible Housing and Universal Design!
Subject: Re: furniture design principles

Hello Dr. B,

The ABLEDATA project is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), US Department of Education, to provide information resources about assistive devices and rehabilitation equipment products for people with disabilities for the purpose of aiding people in finding needed items. However, we, unfortunately, do not have available the kind of guidelines you are seeking.

You might find some assistance through the following organizations:

Center for Inclusive Design & Environmental Access
378 Hayes Hall, School of Architecture & Planning
3435 Main Street
University at Buffalo
Buffalo, NY 14214-3087
(716) 829.3485 extension 329
(716) 829.3758
(716) 829.3861
idea AT ap.buffalo.edu
http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea/indexwelcome.html

THE CENTER FOR UNIVERSAL DESIGN
College of Design
North Carolina State University
50 Pullen Road, Brooks Hall, Room 104
Campus Box 8613
Raleigh, NC. 27695-8613
toll-free : 800.647.6777
ph. 919.515.3082
fax. 919.515.7330
E-mail: cud AT ncsu.edu
http://www.design.ncsu.edu/cud/

Alaska Assistive Technology Project
Department of Education
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Assistive Technologies of Alaska
1016 West 6th St., Suite 205
Anchorage, AK 99501
V: 800/478-4378 (in state only); 907/269-3570.
TTY: 800/898-0138 (in state only); 907/563-0153.
Fax: 907/269-3632.
E-mail: james_beck AT labor.state.ak.us.
Web: http://www.labor.state.ak.us/at/index.htm

In addition, the following company specializes in products for individuals of short stature:

Adaptive Living
4981 SE Sterling Circle
Stuart, FL 34997
561-781-6153, 561-781-9179 Fax
http://www.adaptive-living.com

Sincerely,
Katherine Belknap
Project Director
ABLEDATA

Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

Senior Center Self-Assessment

The Joint Committee on Senior Centers is comprised of members of the Pennsylvania Association of Senior Centers, the Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. They have a number of other resources, Learn about items of Special Interest

The following checklist has been designed to help you think about your Center from the “first impression” perspective. These are some of the things you could be looking at in your Center to prepare to make a positive, lasting impression on those who come to your Center.

If you are answering “no” to questions, you may want to look at modifying or improving that item. For best results, have a person who is unfamiliar with the Center complete the survey. Problems that we see on a daily basis can sometimes become “invisible” to our eyes.

This checklist can help prepare your Center to be in the best position possible for welcoming the new seniors who respond to the Senior Center Marketing Initiative of June 2002. Prepared by the Joint Committee on Senior Centers, February 2002.

The checklist is available as a pdf file here,

Compare this checklist with the one for the Bethel senior center, When you visit the senior center https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2005/08/06/when-you-visit-the-senior-center/ and try it out, Grabbing public toilets https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/10/24/grabbing-public-toilets/ or Visit Bethel Alaska’s Eddie Hoffman Senior Center

1 OUTSIDE AREAS

1. Is there clear signage identifying the location of the Center from the road?
2. Is a sign posted next to or above the entrance door to the Center so participants can easily find it upon approach to the Center?
3. Is the building exterior free from peeling paint or other repairs?
4. Is the parking lot free from debris and weeds?
5. Is the walkway and parking lot adequately lighted?
6. Are the shrubs, outside plants and lawn well maintained?
7. Are outside walkways free of hazardous objects, including debris, weeds and uneven or broken steps?
8. Is outdoor furniture clean and in good shape?
9. Is there easy access for individuals with disabilities?
10. Are rails leading to the doors secure and well maintained?
11. Are curbs painted to signify distinction of levels?
12. Is the outside of the Center attractive and inviting?

2 INSIDE AREAS

1. Is there adequate lighting in rooms, corridors, elevators and stairways?
2. Are guests acknowledged promptly when they enter your Center?
3. Would the atmosphere be characterized as pleasant?
4. Is there a pleasant smell when entering the Center?
5. Is the Center clean enough to meet your personal standards?
6. Is the area inside clutter free, not only on the floor, but also in the space surrounding it?
7. Is the furniture attractive and easy to get in and out of?
8. Is the furniture arranged to promote interaction and conversation?
9. Are magazines, books or other materials for activities neatly stacked and out of the path of travel?
10. Are curtains and window treatments clean and in good condition?
11. Is there an easy to find and easy to read bulletin board with activities, meal schedules and other current information?
12. Is the activity board or other written materials hanging at a readable level for elderly persons of different heights?
13. Are certificates and licenses posted, if required?
14. Is the lighting adequate for older persons?
15. Is the dining area attractive and inviting?
16. Are participants able to sit where they want during meal times without being assigned?
17. Is the kitchen clean and inviting?
18. Is the meal contribution policy, sign-in sheet, and contribution box easy to locate?
19. Does the noise level allow for conversations and quiet activities?

3 SAFETY

1. Are changes in floor levels or coverings distinct enough to prevent tripping?
2. Are carpets free from wear and frayed ends?
3. Are small rugs and runners slip-resistant and non-moving?
4. Are lamp, extension and telephone cords placed out of the flow of traffic?
5. Are chairs sturdy and not easily tipped?
6. Are there handrails in hallways and grab bars in bathrooms?
7. Are written emergency evacuation plans with center floor plans posted throughout the Center?
8. Is a fire extinguisher easy to find and do participants know how to use one?
9. Are emergency numbers posted near the phone?
10. Are smoke detectors properly located and in working condition?
11. Are hallways, passageways between rooms, and other heavy traffic areas equally well lit?
12. Are exits and passageways free from clutter?
13. In the kitchen area, are towels, curtains, and other things that might catch fire located away from the range?
14. Are all extension cords and appliance cords located away from the sink or range areas?
15. Are emergency exits clearly marked?
16. Is emergency lighting functional and adequate?

4 PROGRAM AND SERVICES

1. Are the Center hours and days of operation posted for participants?
2. Can Center hours be changed or altered if requested?
3. Is access to computers and the internet available?
4. Does the Center offer a wide variety of activities for different interests?
5. Are fitness activities offered regularly?
6. Are participants involved with planning activities?
7. Are costs for activities known to individuals?
8. Are other community groups or non-profits involved with Center activities?
9. Are you conducting marketing/advertising activities in your local area?
10. Are you making use of internet technology for advertising?
11. Are newsletters listing activities and menus given or sent to participants on a regular basis?
12. Is there a posted calendar of activities or a newsletter available for people who enter the Center?
13. Are new participants given an orientation to the Center?
14. Is there a welcoming committee made up of current participants to help make newcomers feel comfortable?


Technorati Tags: , , ,
Site Search Tags: , , ,

Ideas to exercise in small cold places

The first story uses a computer game and the second uses school corridors. Both instances, require little funding, enhance neighborliness, and beats the old “jigsaw puzzle = elders” baloney [ Jigsaw puzzles Stave off ageism ].

The bowling story has great possibilities, especially for smaller communities or those without funding or space for analog infrastructure. It can also involve the entire family. Even though the little controller isn’t weighty, the need to control one’s swing and other movements should improve balance, hand-eye coordination, and muscle tone, as well as be fun.

Too bad Bethel never wanted the computer center that was granted, First Neighborhood Networks Center in Native Alaskan Community Opens (not)

[Look at the decent furniture! — furniture [ES&H] and ES&H Avoid dangerous furniture design principles ]


revised–2007-10-02 Boing-boing.com has very interesting stuff they find on the Internet. Here’s a photo of the use of Nintendo Wii in England. The Wii games are not only social but give immediate feedback for hand-eye control, balance, flexibility. I suppose the next trick would be to have the power for the TV and console generated by spectators. Whatever happened to shuffleboard? In England and New Zealand they play lawn bowls. I wonder if Nintendo designs other types of games?

Oldsters Help Propel Wii to Number 1
Elder gameplayers using Nintendo Wii console

Wii bowling knocks over retirement home

By Dave Wischnowsky, Tribune staff reporter
Published February 16, 2007, http://tinyurl.com/2a6nt2

At the Sedgebrook retirement community in Lincolnshire, where the average age is 77, something unexpected has been transpiring since Christmas. The residents, most of whom have never picked up a video game controller in their life, suddenly can’t put the things down.

“I’ve never been into video games,” said 72-year-old Flora Dierbach last week as her husband took a twirl with the Nintendo Wii’s bowling game. “But this is addictive.”

…With an easy-to-use wireless controller that translates a player’s motions onto the screen, Nintendo believes it has found the answer with the Wii…. “This is pretty realistic. You can even put English on the ball,” Hahn said after connecting on a strike with the Wii. “I used to play Pac-Man a little bit, but with this you’re actually moving around and doing something.

“You’re not just sitting there pushing buttons and getting carpal tunnel.”

North Pole’s senior citizens invited to take a walk
Published February 24, 2007
http://newsminer.com/2007/02/24/5468/

The … North Pole Middle School … has offered the use of their upstairs hallway for the seniors to walk while classes are in session. The classes are an hour long, giving walkers ample time to complete several rounds.

The reason for the offer is twofold: to give seniors a place to get some exercise and also to have a senior citizen presence in the school… Walkers need to check in at the front desk. There are elevators to the walking area and any student can give directions. School starts at 8 a.m. and ends at 2:30 p.m. Classes end on the hour and lunch is from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • Georgia Ann Navratil, age 97, of Temple, died Monday. - Temple Daily Telegram
    Temple Daily TelegramGeorgia Ann Navratil, age 97, of Temple, died Monday.Temple Daily TelegramGeorgia Ann Navratil. Georgia Ann Navratil, age 97, of Temple, passed away on Monday, October 15, 2018 at a local care center. A graveside service will take place on Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11:00am at the Floca Memorial Pavilion at Hillcrest ...
  • Renowned conservationist Margaret Thorsborne AO dies at age 91 - The Cairns Post
    The Cairns PostRenowned conservationist Margaret Thorsborne AO dies at age 91The Cairns PostHinchinbrook Island's Thorsborne Trail is named in honour of the former Cardwell resident who passed away on Tuesday night, aged 91. Mrs Thorsborne and her husband Arthur began visiting Hinchinbrook Island in 1964 before moving to the region in 1972.and more »
  • Former Kentucky senator dies at age 92 - messenger-inquirer
    messenger-inquirerFormer Kentucky senator dies at age 92messenger-inquirerLOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Walter "Dee" Huddleston, a former two-term U.S. senator who lost his re-election bid in 1984 to Republican Mitch McConnell in one of Kentucky's most storied and pivotal political campaigns, died Tuesday. He was 92. The ex ...Walter 'Dee' […]
  • Q&A with Trailblazing Composer Thea Musgrave, Still Going Strong at Age 90 - WRTI
    WRTIQ&A with Trailblazing Composer Thea Musgrave, Still Going Strong at Age 90WRTIQ&A with Trailblazing Composer Thea Musgrave, Still Going Strong at Age 90 ... At 90, Thea is busy travelling the world, hearing performances of her work. .... Finally, what projects are you looking forward to taking on as you head toward 91 years strong?
  • Former Ohio First Lady and Marietta native, Betty O'Neill, dies at age 97 - The News Center
    The News CenterFormer Ohio First Lady and Marietta native, Betty O'Neill, dies at age 97The News CenterMarietta, Ohio (WTAP) - Marietta native and former Ohio First Lady, Betty O'Neill, passed away on Saturday at age 97. Her husband and fellow Marietta native, C. William O'Neill, was the Buckeye State's governor from 1956 to 1958, and lat […]
  • Legendary Istanbul Photographer Ara Guler Dies at 90 - Voice of America
    Voice of AmericaLegendary Istanbul Photographer Ara Guler Dies at 90Voice of AmericaLegendary Turkish photographer Ara Guler, famed for iconic images of Istanbul that captured almost three-quarters of a century of the city's history, has died at age 90, state media said. Guler passed away after being rushed to hospital in Istanbul for ...In pictures: […]
  • Drinks Executive Tom Jago Dies Age 93 - FFT.ie
    FFT.ieDrinks Executive Tom Jago Dies Age 93FFT.ieTom Jago, the drinks executive best known for facilitating the development of what became Baileys Irish Cream, died on October 12th. He was 93. Jago began his career in International Distillers & Vintners (IDV - which eventually became part of Diageo ...and more »
  • Longtime 'Days of Our Lives' star Peggy McCay dies at age 90 - ABC Action News
    ABC Action NewsLongtime 'Days of Our Lives' star Peggy McCay dies at age 90ABC Action NewsThe woman who portrayed the matriarch of the Brady family on "Days of Our Lives" has died. Peggy McCay played Caroline Brady on the soap opera for more than 30 years. She was 90 years old and died of natural causes on Sunday, Oct. 7, TVLine.com ...Pe […]
  • Phil Jackson's 'Triangle' guru dead at age 96 - New York Post
    New York PostPhil Jackson's 'Triangle' guru dead at age 96New York PostMANHATTAN, Kan. — Tex Winter, the innovative “Triangle Offense” pioneer who assisted Phil Jackson on 11 NBA championship teams with the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers, has died. He was 96. Kansas State University said Winter died ...Former Bulls, Lakers Coach Fred […]
  • Delegate Frank Deem, 48-year legislative veteran, dies at age 90 - Charleston Gazette-Mail
    Charleston Gazette-MailDelegate Frank Deem, 48-year legislative veteran, dies at age 90Charleston Gazette-MailDelegate Frank Deem, R-Wood, a West Virginia legislative institution whose first term in the House of Delegates was the year the Brooklyn Dodgers won the World Series and “The Honeymooners” premiered on the Dumont television network, died ...UPDATE: […]
October 2018
M T W T F S S
« May    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 189,855 visitors
Advertisements