Search Results for 'environmental change'

Gov Sarah Palin call-in KYUK

Last Friday there was a brief news story about the governor maybe coming to Bethel. An even briefer notice on the radio today (but not in the news) said there would be a call-in program with the Governor on Thursday, January 10, 2008 from 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM [deadline]

Call early as I’m sure there will be a number of people trying to get in.

local numbers for Bethel 543-KYUK (543-5985) and state-wide 1-800-478-5985 (double-check this)

Questions to ask–

  • why did elders not get their flu shots until the week before Thanksgiving? Older people are on the priority list. The state had vaccine available from mid-September.
  • why was all that huge state block grant money spent on reducing the size of the workshop at the senior center, a partial rain shelter for the bus, siding, but no accessible toilets and no way for anyone with a walker or wheelchair to get from the parking lot to the door?
  • why is the nearest nursing home or assisted living home 500 miles away? why must we continue to have elders die unattended (for hours sometimes) at these places?
  • why is there only one intake screener for the elder abuse “hot” line?
  • why don’t state grants for senior services require an active, effective, local senior advisory board at the recipent?
  • why aren’t elders involved in emergency, pandemic, and disaster preparedness, including emergency shelters? (that’s because there is no emergency shelter in Bethel)
  • what are the state’s plans for community relocation (environmental change) and how are elders involved?
  • why are there no housing standards so elders don’t have to spend their limited income on extra heating fuel?
  • why are there public water supplies with water so discolored and distasteful that elders spend their limted income on bottled water?

What’s your question to ask?


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Nonagenarian passion for solar

The problem with being ahead of one’s time is that it isn’t conducive to ever getting caught up. There must be a better way.

By Elizabeth Douglass, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
November 10, 2007

Forty years ago, Harold Hay came up with a way to heat and cool homes using water and the sun….

Now 98, Hay is making what he knows will be his final push.

The retired chemist promotes his cause by funding research. He vents his frustration in letters, e-mails, phone messages to anyone who will listen, and on his own website,

“The main point that he’s trying to make now is that all of our hopes are pinned on all of these complicated technologies, and it’s not that complicated. We could solve a lot of the problems by building our buildings correctly.”

Hay calls his invention the Skytherm system, and it was a wonder in the 1960s because it used the sun to heat and cool a home. The earliest version operated without any electricity, making it a purely passive solar technology.

Skytherm was the first of what’s known today as a roof-pond system….

Hay says he spearheaded the creation of the St. Louis Progressive Party, which helped get him labeled a communist. He came up with a chemical to purify drinking water, and he found a way to chemically toughen fiberboard to broaden its use. During World War II, the self-proclaimed pacifist worked on the development of synthetic rubber to avoid military service and jail. Along the way, almost as a hobby, Hays did groundbreaking research in the origins of medicine. […]

Read the very interesting article here
http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-haroldhay10nov10,0,3607880.story

His website is
This series of Needles is written by Harold R. Hay, Trustee, H.R. & E.J. Hay Charitable Trust, Los Angeles, CA. at the age of 97. Fifty years of dedicated research in solar energy, plus prior successes in government, industry and academia permit a broad evaluation of reasons why solar energy (not renewable energy – a culprit) is not more uniformly accepted. The fault is with all involved – including me.


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Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

How to calculate hazardous materials exposure for older adults

EPA Releases Report on Development of an Exposure Factors Handbook for Aging

Older adults may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of environmental contaminants due to differential exposures arising from physiological and behavioral changes with age, as well as the body’s decreased capacity to defend against toxic stressors. To address these issues and discuss practical considerations of the utility of an Exposure Factors Handbook for the Aging in conducting exposure assessments, a panel of experts in the fields of exposure assessment, risk assessment, physiology, and behavioral science were convened at a national workshop in February of 2007. This report summarizes the discussions held during the workshop, highlights several sources of existing data, and provides recommendations for additional research. Panelists included national and international experts in the fields of gerontology, physiology, exposure assessment, and behavioral science.
The workshop panelists discussed practical issues related to evaluating and protecting against environmental health risks posed to older adults. A summary report of the workshop is now available online […]

http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/CFM/recordisplay.cfm?deid=171923

from Aging Initiative” Listserver! The “Aging_Initiativ” Listserver [sic] is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to raise awareness about the susceptibility of older persons to environmental hazards and to share information on strategies to reduce or prevent exposure. We use the listserver to send email to you, to let you know about important news and updated information.

see earlier, Aging and Toxic Response (EPA review)

Lead and Older Adults

Long-term lead exposure linked to cognitive decline in older adults

The Association between Blood Lead Levels and Osteoporosis among Adults – Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) Campbell JR, Auinger P. 2007. Environ Health Perspect: doi:10.1289/ehp.9716.

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Quick notes

Legislature doubles elderly aid in special session Published: June 27, 2007
JUMPS TO $250 A MONTH: Legislature also increases maximum qualifying income. …
The Legislature voted to increase the aid so that it ranges from $125 to $250 from the current $120 a month for the year that starts Sunday. They also boosted the number of seniors eligible to an estimated 10,700, from the current 7,000, by raising the maximum qualifying income level to $22,347 for individuals and $29,960 for couples… Lawmakers called for the special session just weeks after adjourning for the year in Juneau on May 16. The senior-aid legislation died after becoming ensnared in end-of-session politics.

Several lawmakers argued Tuesday that increasing the amount of cash assistance would create an unsustainable amount of state spending for an entitlement that overlapped other state-sponsored programs for seniors.
http://www.adn.com/news/government/legislature/story/9084438p-9000510c.html
See earlier post, Alaska Senior Care special session – https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2007/06/04/alaska-senior-care-special-session/

Vote for Your Favorite Essay, Poems and Photographs Contest to Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Rachel Carson’s Life

Vote for your favorite finalist from the many intergenerational teams that submitted photos, essays, or poems for the Rachel Carson “Sense of Wonder” contest. You may vote for your favorite in each of the five categories. The contest commemorates the 100th anniversary of environmentalist Rachel Carson’s life. Finalists were chosen from the entries submitted by teams in twelve states, including children as young as 15 months and some older adults over 90 years old.
http://www.epa.gov/aging/resources/thesenseofwonder/contest/

The deadline to vote is Friday, July 20, 2007. Winners will be announced at the annual meeting of Generations United, July 24-27 in Washington, DC.

Visit Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub to see that Rachel Carson is still making folks think.

Excellence in Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging

The EPA is accepting applications from municipalities, counties and tribes for an award which recognizes outstanding community planning and strategies that support active aging. Awards for “Excellence in Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging” will be presented to communities that demonstrate the best and most inclusive overall approach to implementing smart growth and active aging at the neighborhood, tribe, municipality, county, and/or regional levels.

Applicants must be public-sector entities in the United States and coordinate with their local Area Agency on Aging. Public-sector entities include all levels of elected governments, from city councils to state legislatures and their constituent parts such as planning departments and other executive branch divisions. Application, Award Guidelines and Entry Rules on the Excellence Awards for Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging can be found at http://www.epa.gov/aging/bhc/awards/

Applications are due October 17, 2007. Winners will be announced at the 7th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth: Building Safe, Healthy and Livable Communities Conference in Washington, DC, February 2008. For more general information on Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging please see http://epa.gov/aging/bhc/index.htm

New Web Site Supports Active Aging
The Learning Network for Active Aging recently launched their website, http://www.lnactiveaging.org, which will serve as one of the focal points for information exchange on the Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging Initiative. The Learning Network is affiliated with the Active for Life initiative, headquartered at the School of Rural Public Health at Texas A&M Health Science Center. Active for Life ( http://www.activeforlife.info) is one of several Active Living projects funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
The Learning Network receives technical support from the Healthy Aging Research Network at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, and is coordinated with the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA).

Mapping Older America
The Brookings Institute has recently released “Mapping the Growth of Older America: Seniors and Boomers in the Early 21st Century,” by William H. Frey (June 2007). This report highlights how the aging boomers, who constitute this decade’s fastest growing age group, are expanding nearly 50 percent in size from 2000 to 2010. This group-more highly educated, with more professional women, and more diverse than its predecessors-will add new stresses to suburban and Sun Belt locations where they are predominantly “retiring in place” with demands for health, transportation, and other services.
For full report see http://www3.brookings.edu/views/articles/200705frey.pdf

Fact sheets for Caregivers and Older Adults
The EPA Aging Initiative has developed fact sheets on environmental hazards that can worsen common chronic conditions. These brief fact sheets are available at no cost and can be downloaded at our website http://epa.gov/aging/resources/factsheets/index.htm#fs . The fact sheets have been translated into 11 languages. A low vision version is available on the website too. To request copies please send an email to: aging.info AT epa DOT gov

Most of the above is from June 2007 Aging Initiative List Serve published by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Sort of amazing as just a few years ago the current White House agency was promoting that older people were worth less when calculating environmental impacts.

The list serv is worth subscribing to. Unfortunately, they are not following the convention of putting their contact info on each issue so I’ll have to track down the info for you.


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