Search Results for 'culture'

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press writer

LOS ANGELES — Wilda Little speaks Creole with her cousin two or three times a week and listens to her favorite zydeco bands on aging vinyl records, but that’s about as close as the Louisiana transplant gets these days to the Creole culture of her youth.
‘My children never learned Creole,’ said Little, 80. ‘They were never interested in that.’

Her culture has been in a long decline here, as zydeco dance halls shut down and native Creole speakers died. And now, Hurricane Katrina has dealt these remote outposts of shrimp gumbo and the zydeco two-step a devastating blow.

Creoles who live thousands of miles from the bayous of southern Louisiana suddenly find themselves uncertain ambassadors for a city — and a way of life — that is endangered.

‘We’re a part of that culture of New Orleans and now it’s gone,’ said Norwood Clark Jr., the owner of Uncle Darrow’s Creole and Cajun restaurant in Marina del Rey.

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Words of wisdom about academic culture

Once upon a time at Far West Big U., for instance, a search-committee member wondered aloud: “Can job candidate Venerable, who seems to have a little arthritis, get around this campus fast enough? Maybe we need his medical reports.” Once told that asking for medical reports was illegal and that Mr. Venerable was the same age as Mick Jagger, the member retreated, harrumphing. (A decade later, Mr. Venerable was still hiking and cross-country skiing, Mick Jagger had had a hip replacement, and the committee member was dead.)

Walter Soboleff, Tlingit linguist 1908-2011

2011-05-22
“Tlingit Elder Walter Soboleff Dies at 102” http://www.ktuu.com/ktuu-walter-soboleff-obituary-052211,0,4639306.story

Noted Tlingit elder Walter Soboleff dies from the Juneau Empire.

http://aprn.org/2011/05/23/tlingit-leader-walter-soboleff-passes-away/

2009-11-14 Celebrating 101 years Juneau Empire – Juneau,AK,USA
In the summer, he’d return to Alaska and work on the seine boats out of Sitka or the cold storage. The price of salmon then included humpies selling for 4 …
http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/111309/loc_516060703.shtml

2008-11-14 nonagenarian centenarian Tlingit linguist

Dr Soboleff was a main speaker at the Elders and Youth Conference and at AFN in Anchorage this year. Elders and Youth is the convention which precedes the statewide Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention. Soboleff is important in anthropological linguistics but better known for his contributions to Alaska as reverend, teacher, organizer, archivist.

Walter Soboleff, AFN 2008

1908 was the year that the 88 million Americans living at the time heard about a “ball” dropping in New York’s Time Square to celebrate the coming of a New Year; it was the first year that Americans would honor their mothers (Mother’s Day). Teddy Roosevelt was president, a postage stamp cost 2 cents, and Henry Ford was developing the Model T, which would sell for $850.
….
Kajakti, “One Slain in Battle,” was born November 14, 1908, to Alexander Ivan Soboleff, the son of a Russian Orthodox priest, and his wife, Anna Hunter of Killisnoo, Alaska. Kajakti (also spelled Kha’jaq’tii) was born into a world where his mother’s Tlingit culture was being forever changed by his father’s European one. He was named after an Angoon Clan leader to whom he was related.

As a 7 year old, Kajakti was taken to an Iicht (shaman) by his mother and was treated for reasons he never understood. He also experienced being sent to the “Russian school” in Sitka as an 8-year-old, only to be sent home again because it closed due to the overthrow of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, its benefactor (1917). A year later, the 10-year-old served as an interpreter for a doctor who visited Killisnoo during the 1918 flu epidemic that brought many Alaska Native tribes to the edge of extinction.

JUNEAU — More than 1,000 papers documenting Alaska Native history by Tlingit elder Walter Soboleff have been posted on the Internet by Sealaska Heritage Institute in what officials are calling a unique and priceless collection.

Running from 1929 to 1995, the documents provide insight into the Native land claims struggle and the Alaska Native Brotherhood, institute president Rosita Worl said. … “He begins at a real pivotal time in our history,” she said.

from APRN.org
Web Extra: Dr. Soboleff at 100 (extended version)

Tue, October 21, 2008 At the Elders and Youth gathering that precedes the AFN convention, First Alaskans Institute trustee Byron Mallot spoke about the incredible legacy of Tlingit elder Dr. Walter Soboleff. Soboleff will turn 100 years old in November and Mallot said introducing him was humbling. Here is an extended interview with Dr. Soboleff.

[revised 2008-11-14] The Anchorage Daily Newsreader provides additional links to his birthday celebration.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY-OLD NATIVE LEADER: The tributes continue for Walter Soboleff of Juneau – a Tlingit scholar and Presbyterian pastor – who turns 100 years old today, reports the Juneau Empire. In a speech Thursday at the Southeast Alaska Native Summit, Soboleff said that as white culture overtook Alaska, he “tried to take the best of both worlds.”

His son Ross Soboleff, 57, said that pluralist attitude was novel in his father’s time. “It certainly was presented to us, and to his generation, ‘The Native ways are old. We’ve got to put those aside and take on the new life.’ He was someone who pioneered the idea that, well, no, you don’t have to put those aside, those things are part of who you are. … I can make it in this greater society we live in, but I’m still a Native. Things that are part of our way of life have validity and value. Someone had to come up with that idea. This guy was one of the first to see that it’s possible – not just see that it was possible, but to actually do it.”

The article includes photos from Soboleff’s life. Soboleff gave a dramatic keynote speech at the Elders and Youth Conference last month in Anchorage. You can hear it at the Alaska Public Radio Network site. More than 1,000 papers by Soboleff documenting Alaska Native history are being archived by the Sealaska Heritage Institute. Many can be seen here.


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Slate magazine issue on old people

Here at Slate, we take the subject of growing old more seriously. Heck, it’s going to happen to all of us someday—if we’re lucky. And so we have commissioned a series of articles on aging and the aged. We wanted to see the world through the eyes of our elders, to explore the ways in which old folks influence our economy, politics, and culture. To walk a mile in their Rockports.

Wednesday

Pimp My Buick: Will new technologies make old people safer on the road?” by Farhad Manjoo. Posted Sept. 10, 2008.

What’s the Best Adult Diaper? That depends,” by Justin Peters. Posted Sept. 10, 2008.

The Senior-Citizen Cookbook: How your food needs will change as you get older,” by Sarah Dickerman. Posted Sept. 10, 2008

Diary of a 100-Year-Old Man: Dreams of My Mother, and a Visit From My Grandson,” by Leon Despres. Posted Sept. 10, 2008

Recycled:Naughty Nursing Homes: Is it time to let the elderly have more sex?” by Daniel Engber. Posted Sept. 10, 2008

Tuesday

Is Grandpa Bad for the Environment? Climate change and the aging population,” by Jacob Leibenluft. Posted Sept. 9, 2008.

Best Friends Forever: Grumpy Old Men, The Bucket List, and the undying appeal of the old-buddy movie,” by Jessica Winter. Posted Sept. 9, 2008.

A Visit to My Future: What happens when I try to live like a senior citizen,” by Emily Yoffe. Posted Sept. 9, 2008.

The Oldest Profession: Why don’t architects ever retire?” by Witold Rybczynski. Posted Sept. 9, 2008.

Notes for the WWII Aleutians Alaska NM project

Thursday, September 02, 2004
Bataan Prisoners’ Returned to SFe’s Bruns Hospital http://tinyurl.com/j3yak

When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II or http://tinyurl.com/l49ay

Book review of Dean Kohlhoff’s When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II. Lydia T. Black, Ph.D. / Reprinted from: Pacific Historical Review v65, n4 (Nov 1996)

This book about the experience of a small group of indigenous Native American inhabitants of the Aleutian Archipelago during and after World War II. One of the villages was Atka — where the Chapel of St. Nicholas was damaged. […]


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