Search Results for 'checklist'

Alaska Planning Checklist

The checklists aren’t well-presented but do offer some good ideas. Even though the web address (URL) is a dot com, this is a state of Alaska website. Here’s some ideas for pet preparedness.

http://www.ak-prepared.com/plans/mitigation/dogs_cats.html

[see previous Older people in disasters and humanitarian crises: Guidelines for best practice]

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Getcare.com Checklist Summary

http://www.getcare.com/learn/checklistsummary.shtml

Our checklists are designed to help you select care providers that best meet your needs. You can view the checklist for any service type simply by clicking on ‘checklist’ in the table below. You may also click on any service type to learn about it.

Print the checklists before you visit or speak with potential care providers and they’ll remind you what to look for and what to ask. Your completed checklists will make it easier to compare providers and make informed decisions.

In-Home Care
Home Care Services checklist
Home Health Care checklist
Hospice checklist
Home-Delivered Meals checklist
Community Health and Social Services
Adult Day Services checklist
Meal Programs checklist
Senior Center checklist
Transportation checklist
Medical Services
Rehabilitation Services checklist
Residential Facilities
Assisted Living checklist
Board and Care Home checklist
Congregate Housing checklist
Hospice checklist
Independent Living Community checklist
Nursing Home checklist
Care Coordination and Other Services
Care Manager checklist
Elder Law Attorney checklist
Long-Term Care Insurance checklist


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CHECKLIST FOR STAIRWAYS, ESPECIALLY FOR HOMES

This comes from the National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modification, which has lots of other nifty resources in their library for Strategies for Aging in Place

Their main site is featuring

Our vision is to create a Center of excellence to ensure the independence, safety, and well being of older persons through fall prevention. Our mission is to provide leadership, create new knowledge, and develop sustainable programs for seniors and their families, professionals, program administrators, and policy makers.

CHECKLIST FOR STAIRWAYS, Recommended by Jake Pauls, CPE

GENERAL

[ ] Locate steps only where they are necessary and logical.
[ ] Avoid small changes of levels, especially single steps.
[ ] Use safety glazing for glass that could be impacted in a fall on a stairway.
[ ] Arrange for any doors adjacent to steps not to swing over any steps.
[ ] Install gates to prevent infant and toddler use.
[ ] Avoid sudden changes of views and visual distractions from stairways.
[ ] Make steps visually prominent so that their presence is obvious.

STEPS

[ ] Build step riser dimensions no higher than 180 mm or 7 inches.
[ ] Build step tread dimensions at least 280 mm or 11 inches front to back.
[ ] Keep risers and treads consistent in size (to within 5 mm or 3/16 inch).
[ ] Conspicuously mark flights having inconsistently sized steps; e.g. paint a contrasting stripe (25 to 50 mm, 1 to 2 inches wide) on all stepnosings (right at the leading edges of the treads) so that the nonuniformity stands out.
[ ] Remove thick (10 mm, 3/8 inch, or more) carpets and underpads on treads.
[ ] Fix tread coverings securely; coverings must be tight against the nosings.
[ ] Remove/repair tripping surfaces and projecting screws or nails on treads.
[ ] Provide slip-resistant (rough) finish on stair treads subject to wetting.
[ ] If stairs are subject to wetting, slope treads approximately 1 percent (1/8 inch per foot) to drain water away from nosings.
[ ] If nosings project (and they do not need to if treads are 280 mm, 11 inches, deep), keep nosing projections uniform in the flight and configure them so that there is no tripping hazard to persons with poor foot control.

VISIBILITY

[ ] Provide slightly rounded nosings (maximum radius 13 mm, 0.5 inch) for visibility and injury reduction.
[ ] Avoid tread materials and coverings with visually distracting patterns.
[ ] Mark nosings permanently (not with tape) if they are not distinctly visible. Note that a painted stripe even works very well, and looks good, on carpet.
[ ] Provide lighting that makes tread nosings distinctly visible.
[ ] Provide lighting that does not cause glare or strong shadows.
[ ] Illuminate stairs with no less than two bulbs (especially if incandescent).
[ ] Have light levels on stairs at least as high as on adjacent areas.
[ ] Unless continuously lit or automatically switched on, provide light switches at each point of stairway access.
[ ] Install permanently illuminated, small light sources (e.g., night lights) on stairs.

HANDRAILS

[ ] Provide at least one handrail on each stair regardless of the number of steps.
[ ] On wide, monumental stairways provide at least one handrail at the normal path of travel. If used by crowds, space handrails 1525 mm (60 inches) apart.
[ ] Continue handrails between stair flights at the shortest path of travel.
[ ] Extend the handrail, without a break, the full length of the stair between floors.
[ ] Augment any decorative stair railing system with a functional handrail.
[ ] Install a handrail around which fingers and thumb can encircle. If you wrap a measuring tape around the railing, the loop should be shorter than 160 mm (6 1/4 inches) for adult hands. A smaller railing is desirable for children.
[ ] Maintain adequate hand clearance between the handrail and nearby surfaces.
[ ] Position handrails at about adult elbow height, 900-1000 mm or 36-39 inches.
[ ] Provide handrails that are visually prominent.
[ ] Repair or replace broken handrails.
[ ] Fix handrails securely to walls and posts. You should be able to bear your entire weight on the handrail without damaging the handrail.

Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

Senior Center Self-Assessment

The Joint Committee on Senior Centers is comprised of members of the Pennsylvania Association of Senior Centers, the Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. They have a number of other resources, Learn about items of Special Interest

The following checklist has been designed to help you think about your Center from the “first impression” perspective. These are some of the things you could be looking at in your Center to prepare to make a positive, lasting impression on those who come to your Center.

If you are answering “no” to questions, you may want to look at modifying or improving that item. For best results, have a person who is unfamiliar with the Center complete the survey. Problems that we see on a daily basis can sometimes become “invisible” to our eyes.

This checklist can help prepare your Center to be in the best position possible for welcoming the new seniors who respond to the Senior Center Marketing Initiative of June 2002. Prepared by the Joint Committee on Senior Centers, February 2002.

The checklist is available as a pdf file here,

Compare this checklist with the one for the Bethel senior center, When you visit the senior center https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2005/08/06/when-you-visit-the-senior-center/ and try it out, Grabbing public toilets https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/10/24/grabbing-public-toilets/ or Visit Bethel Alaska’s Eddie Hoffman Senior Center

1 OUTSIDE AREAS

1. Is there clear signage identifying the location of the Center from the road?
2. Is a sign posted next to or above the entrance door to the Center so participants can easily find it upon approach to the Center?
3. Is the building exterior free from peeling paint or other repairs?
4. Is the parking lot free from debris and weeds?
5. Is the walkway and parking lot adequately lighted?
6. Are the shrubs, outside plants and lawn well maintained?
7. Are outside walkways free of hazardous objects, including debris, weeds and uneven or broken steps?
8. Is outdoor furniture clean and in good shape?
9. Is there easy access for individuals with disabilities?
10. Are rails leading to the doors secure and well maintained?
11. Are curbs painted to signify distinction of levels?
12. Is the outside of the Center attractive and inviting?

2 INSIDE AREAS

1. Is there adequate lighting in rooms, corridors, elevators and stairways?
2. Are guests acknowledged promptly when they enter your Center?
3. Would the atmosphere be characterized as pleasant?
4. Is there a pleasant smell when entering the Center?
5. Is the Center clean enough to meet your personal standards?
6. Is the area inside clutter free, not only on the floor, but also in the space surrounding it?
7. Is the furniture attractive and easy to get in and out of?
8. Is the furniture arranged to promote interaction and conversation?
9. Are magazines, books or other materials for activities neatly stacked and out of the path of travel?
10. Are curtains and window treatments clean and in good condition?
11. Is there an easy to find and easy to read bulletin board with activities, meal schedules and other current information?
12. Is the activity board or other written materials hanging at a readable level for elderly persons of different heights?
13. Are certificates and licenses posted, if required?
14. Is the lighting adequate for older persons?
15. Is the dining area attractive and inviting?
16. Are participants able to sit where they want during meal times without being assigned?
17. Is the kitchen clean and inviting?
18. Is the meal contribution policy, sign-in sheet, and contribution box easy to locate?
19. Does the noise level allow for conversations and quiet activities?

3 SAFETY

1. Are changes in floor levels or coverings distinct enough to prevent tripping?
2. Are carpets free from wear and frayed ends?
3. Are small rugs and runners slip-resistant and non-moving?
4. Are lamp, extension and telephone cords placed out of the flow of traffic?
5. Are chairs sturdy and not easily tipped?
6. Are there handrails in hallways and grab bars in bathrooms?
7. Are written emergency evacuation plans with center floor plans posted throughout the Center?
8. Is a fire extinguisher easy to find and do participants know how to use one?
9. Are emergency numbers posted near the phone?
10. Are smoke detectors properly located and in working condition?
11. Are hallways, passageways between rooms, and other heavy traffic areas equally well lit?
12. Are exits and passageways free from clutter?
13. In the kitchen area, are towels, curtains, and other things that might catch fire located away from the range?
14. Are all extension cords and appliance cords located away from the sink or range areas?
15. Are emergency exits clearly marked?
16. Is emergency lighting functional and adequate?

4 PROGRAM AND SERVICES

1. Are the Center hours and days of operation posted for participants?
2. Can Center hours be changed or altered if requested?
3. Is access to computers and the internet available?
4. Does the Center offer a wide variety of activities for different interests?
5. Are fitness activities offered regularly?
6. Are participants involved with planning activities?
7. Are costs for activities known to individuals?
8. Are other community groups or non-profits involved with Center activities?
9. Are you conducting marketing/advertising activities in your local area?
10. Are you making use of internet technology for advertising?
11. Are newsletters listing activities and menus given or sent to participants on a regular basis?
12. Is there a posted calendar of activities or a newsletter available for people who enter the Center?
13. Are new participants given an orientation to the Center?
14. Is there a welcoming committee made up of current participants to help make newcomers feel comfortable?


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