Search Results for 'can you help'

2008 free tax help for some in Alaska

Free Tax Help – 2008 Tax-Aide and VITA sites. The VITA program is a federal grant that rural senior programs can apply for.

This program is designed to prepare basic tax returns for most low and middle income taxpayers, with an emphasis on senior citizens and disabled taxpayers. Sites are staffed by volunteers trained by the IRS to prepare basic tax returns. E-file means it’s fast, accurate AND it’s absolutely FREE. Volunteers receive training on the Earned Income Credit and other personal tax credits. If your income is below $39,783 you MAY qualify for an Earned Income Credit, up to $4,716.

*** You must file a 2007 tax return to receive the Economic Stimulus Payments. To be eligible for this payment, you must have a tax liability, or at least $3000 of earned income, Social Security benefits, or certain VA benefits. If you had at $3,000 of qualifying income, you should file a tax return even if you are not required.

AARP TaxAide sites may offer priority service to taxpayers age 60 and older.

As all locations are staffed by volunteers using donated space, these dates and times may change. To get the most current information, please call the Alaska 211 referral line by dialing 2-1-1, or 1-800- 478-2221. [try this and see if it works. There were problems last week or so– the software couldn’t figure out rural Alaska zip codes.]

NO COST ELECTRONIC FILING AVAILABLE

WHAT TO BRING
Social security cards or current record of SSN’s for you, spouse and all dependents.
Form W-2 (Wage and Tax Statement) from each employer.
All income information (such as Forms 1099-INT, 1099-DIV, SSA-1099 or RRB-1099 and 1099R).
Record of VA benefits received
Property tax and mortgage interest statements.
List of your medical, interest, contributions, and miscellaneous expenses (to itemize your deductions).
Copies of last year’s tax return (helps volunteer prepare this year’s return).
Child care payment information and name, address and SSN/EIN of your child care provider.

The rest of the document is written in a way to make it difficult to re-post so I’ll only list the names of places. Contact them for hours and dates.

  • Anchorage Senior Center Tax-Aide
  • Northeast Anchorage Tax-Aide
  • First Free Methodist, Anchorage
  • Spenard Rec Center
  • Crosspoint Church Tax-Aide, Anchorage
  • University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Palmer Senior Center
  • Mid-Valley Senior Center
  • Wasilla Senior Center
  • Upper Susitna Senior Housing
  • Glacier View Bible Church
  • Willow Senior Housing
  • Fairbanks Senior Center Tax-Aide
  • North Pole Library Tax-Aide
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Noel Wien Library Tax-Aide
  • North Pole Senior Center Tax-Aide
  • Nikiski Senior Citizens, Inc.
  • Homer Senior Center
  • Seward Senior Center
  • AVTEC Library (Seward)
  • Soldotna Tax-Aide Site
  • University of Alaska, SE
  • Swan Lake Senior Center
  • United Methodist Church, Sitka
  • Tongass Credit Union
  • Rendesvous Senior Center
  • Ketchikan Parks & Rec Center
  • Metlakatla Tongass Credit Union
  • Craig City Youth Center
  • Juneau Mendenhall Library
  • Wrangell Senior Center
  • Kodiak College
  • Valdez Tax-Aide
  • Kodiak Senior Citizen Fair
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Reverend David Salmon, Athabascan nonagenarian

The first link to the audio story is quite good. Father Salmon and Peter John (another nonagenarian) were extraordinarily accomplished.
Rev. David Salmon

Flags are at half-staff across Alaska today, following the death of an Athabascan elder and leader. The Reverend David Salmon died yesterday. He was the first traditional chief for the Tanana Chief’s region, and the first Athabascan ordained to the Episcopal ministry.
Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks
http://aprn.org/2007/10/12/alaska-remembers-tanana-elder-david-salmon/

  • The 95-year-old cherished Gwich’in elder has been first traditional chief since August 2003, following the passing of Chief Peter John of Minto. The position is … held in high esteem.

  • Last Modified: October 12, 2007 at 02:43 PM
    Athabascan traditional chief Salmon dies at 95

    FAIRBANKS — The first traditional chief for the Athabascan people of the Interior died Thursday at his home in Chalkyitsik. The Rev. David Salmon was 95. “He was sitting in his favorite chair when he passed,” Salmon’s granddaughter, Patricia Salmon”

    http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/story/9374481p-9287881c.html

    Father Salmon’s biography is here, from the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments,

  • http://www.catg.org/gallery/elders/DavidSalmon.html
  • and another one is here, Tanana Chiefs Conference–

  • Chief Salmon, who was first made Chief of Chalkyitsik at the age of 29, helped shape the community and was instrumental in building a school and starting a store. He introduced the first Christmas tree and potlatch, and built the church by hauling 90 logs at the age of 70, using only a chainsaw.
  • Chief David Salmon – “My father saved my life”
  • He received an honorary degree from the University of Alaska.

    “Athabascan elder Rev. David Salmon, traditional chief of Chalkyitsik and second chief of Interior Alaska villages with the Tanana Chiefs Conference, just celebrated his 90th birthday, was the first Gwich’in to be ordained as a priest in the Episcopal Church where he served for more than 42 years.

    Salmon has had a life-long interest in education and sharing his cultural knowledge with others through programs such as UAF’s Elder in Residence program and the Academy of Elders, an intense immersion program for certified teachers intent on developing K-12 curriculum and teacher training programs. Salmon has collaborated extensively with UAF’s anthropology department and has been a Geist lecturer at the University of Alaska Museum for the past five summers. Salmon is considered a master toolmaker and his tools, fish traps and canoes are on display at the museum and in other university buildings. Salmon is a founding member of Denakkanaaga nonprofit elders’ organization. In January, the David Salmon Tribal Hall was opened in Fairbanks and dedicated by TCC in recognition of a lifetime of service. Salmon will receive an Honorary Doctor of Laws.”
    http://www.uaf.edu/commencement/2002/hdr.html

    Chief David Salmon 2006
    Chief David Salmon Traditional Athabascan Tool Collection, a new art acquisition purchased jointly by Doyon, Limited and the Doyon Foundation.

    “I knew that if I didn’t make the tools, that they would just stay back there to be forgotten… How can the young people learn without seeing the tool? The Athabascan way is to teach by showing you; then when you see, you will learn. That is why when I speak about a tool, it must be in my hand. That is how it always was; that is how it should be.” — Chief David Salmon

    … in the summer of 1994, Chief David Salmon began to craft a collection of tools, illustrating the pre- and early post-contact technology of theAthabascans of Alaska’s Interior. Most of these tools were used in the Athabascans’ subsistence lifestyle into the 1920s.

    http://www.doyon.com/pdfs/news_august04.pdf

    Both Chief Salmon and Chief Peter John spoke widely about their religious faith.
    “The history of this country is not known,” Salmon explains his reasons for doing that book, plus another on the oral history of his people. “Young people do not know it. Old people die with it. Well, I don’t want to die with it. I want the young people to have it.”O’Brien, Thomas A. 1997. Athabaskan implements from the skin house days as related by Reverend David Salmon. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1997. OCLC: 42066842

    The Gospel according to Peter John
    # Publisher: Alaska Native Knowledge Network (1996)
    # Language: English
    # ASIN: B000BSFGQY

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    More on computer accessibility: let your uvula do the browsing

    The notice of the Vocal Joystick for accessibility comes from

    Opera browser uses voice commands. Now I’ll have to actually test it to see how well it works. The Vocal Joystick would work on all software that uses a mouse device. I thought something like Dragon Naturally Speaking can command more than the voice recognition software? Somewhere in the back of my mind is a little piece of software I’ve seen that also does voice commands ➡ not a mouse substitute but nevertheless slick and free (for Firefox) (originally noted at Paul Hamilton’s FREE online resources and downloadable programs for learners and their teachers.

    University of Washington researchers are developing a new “Vocal Joystick” interface to make software more accessible for people who don’t have use of their hands or arms. The software converts simple vowel sounds and other intonations into cursor movement. The louder the sound, the faster the cursor moves. Saying “K-Ch” represents a mouse click and release….

    “A lot of people ask: ‘Why don’t you just use speech recognition?'” (electrical engineering professor Jeffrey) Bilmes said. “It would be very slow to move a cursor using discrete commands like ‘move right’ or ‘go faster.’ The voice, however, is able to do continuous commands quickly and easily.” Early tests suggest that an experienced user of Vocal Joystick would have as much control as someone using a handheld device…

    “The tool’s latest developments will be presented this month in Tempe, Ariz. at the Assets Conference on Computers and Accessibility.

    Vocal Joystick detects sounds 100 times a second and instantaneously turns that sound into movement on the screen….

    Versions of Vocal Joystick exist for browsing the Web, drawing on a screen, controlling a cursor and playing a video game. A version also exists for operating a robotic arm, and Bilmes believes the technology could be used to control an electronic wheelchair.” […] http://uwnews.org/article.asp?articleID=37134

    Video demonstrations and publications are available on the group’s Web site,


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    Bath falls common among older adults, but can be prevented

    This isn’t new news but the use of videotape for actual “ethology” (observation of behavior) is a good idea. It is most worthwhile to remind everyone that ordinary bathroom fixtures are not suitable for those needing assistance and are not appropriate for older people; frequently not even appropriate for anyone, tall or short, lithe or lazy. See the Bethel Senior Center for what should be banned in public facilities (When you visit the senior center). Emphasis added.

    Public release date: 13-Sep-2006,

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-09/uomh-bfc091306.php

    Installation of proper equipment essential

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Getting in and out of the bathtub or shower can be a perilous journey for older adults, even when they have bathrooms already equipped with safety features, according to research by the University of Michigan Health System.

    Researchers videotaped people ages 60 and older who demonstrated (while fully clothed) how they normally climbed in and out of the shower or tub. One-third of the 89 participants in the study had difficulty, such as plopping onto a tub seat or hitting the side of the tub or the shower threshold with their legs.

    “We found that there are a lot of independently bathing older adults who have trouble or are unsafe getting into and out of the tub or shower stall,” says lead author Susan L. Murphy, ScD, OTR, an occupational therapist and research assistant professor with the University of Michigan Medical School’s Division of Geriatric Medicine, part of the Department of Internal Medicine. The study appears in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

    “For older adults, losing the ability to bathe is associated with having falls, fracturing bones, and even being admitted to a nursing home. It is important that we take steps to help to prevent bathing disability before it occurs,” Murphy says.

    One of the major problem areas the researchers found involved sliding glass doors in showers. Three-quarters of participants who used shower stalls with sliding glass doors tried to utilize the door for stability or balance.

    “This is extremely unsafe because shower doors were not designed to support a person’s weight,” Murphy says. “This problem could be easily remedied by educating older adults not to use the door as a support or possibly replacing it with a shower curtain, which was used only rarely by older adults in this study.”

    Participants in the study were residents of two congregate housing facilities and had no cognitive impairment. They were videotaped as they demonstrated how they used their environment while getting into and out of the shower or tub – that is, whether they used grab-bars, towel bars, shower curtains, glass doors, tub seats, and other parts of the tub to assist themselves.

    The videotapes were also evaluated for the participants’ fluidity of movement and whether they had difficulty negotiating the environment. While the majority of people using both tubs and shower stalls used safe environmental features such as grab bars, many used unsafe features in addition to the safe ones. Nineteen percent of participants using a tub were evaluated as using unsafe features, and more than 70 percent of those with shower stalls used unsafe features, such as the glass door, towel bar or a tub seat. One participant had a plastic lawn chair as a tub seat, a particularly dangerous device given curved shape of the tub floor.

    Some safety problems researchers observed can be fixed easily such as the installation of a shower curtain in place of a door, and proper instruction about built-in bathroom safety features (such as grab bars designed for weight-bearing) for new residents of senior housing facilities. A focus on better designs of bathrooms in senior housing facilities was also suggested by the researchers.

    “We think the results from this study demonstrate the need for healthcare professionals to become involved in helping to prevent bathing disability, instead of just treating people in the hospital after they have had a fall in the bathroom,” she says. “While bathrooms in senior housing facilities are designed to be safe, we have found that older adults often do not know the difference between a grab bar and a towel bar. They also have unsafe strategies of getting into and out of their shower or tub. Occupational therapists often see older adults for bathing problems and would be ideal to intervene with older adults before they start to lose the ability to bathe.”

    ###

    In addition to Murphy, the authors on the paper were Neil B. Alexander, M.D., professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and director of the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System; Linda V. Nyquist, Ph.D., senior research associate-social sciences, Institute of Gerontology; and Debra M. Strasburg, M.S., P.T., research physical therapist, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System.

    The research was supported in part by grants from the AARP Andrus Foundation, the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research & Development, and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Claude Pepper Older Adults Independence Center. Murphy is a recipient of a K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and Alexander is a recipient of a K24 Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research from NIA.

    Citation: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Aug. 2006, “Bath Transfers in Older Adult Congregate Housing Residents: Assessing the Person-Environment Interaction.”

    Contact: Katie Gazella, kgazella AT umich DOT edu
    734-764-2220
    University of Michigan Health System


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    Comments on Al-Can and Aleutians photos

    I think this may be a way for people to more easily add their knowledge about the Aleutians War and building the Alaska-Canada Highway. Easier than what was originally posted on the Special Projects page Al-Can Highway and the Aleutians War, Alaska in WWII

    The photos are hosted at Flickr, but only those with an account can comment there. Fortunately, a “newsreader” such as http://www.curiostudio.com/ Great News feed reader, can collect the comments on Flickr, along with the tiny images to which the comments are attached. This means anyone can comment here, but one can see the full-size photos there. I would advise you to open the links (click on the thumbnail pictures below) to the pictures on Flickr in a separate tab or window. In some cases, tech support has re-arranged the original comment or changed the titles, but the photos should still be there.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    revised 2007-10-10
    There is another way to view the photos as a set (but not the comments as posted below). Flickrleech.net provides a really nice way to view Flickr photos (please support his bandwidth). Any small picture can then be clicked on to view the actual Flickr hosted image and comments. Here’s the link

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



    Comment about Shemya Attu Agattu NGeo

    Gruscana has posted a comment:

    “National Geographic map, can be purchased. Attu and Shemya can be viewed in “more views”, all the way to the west in the margin”
    theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/07/12/charlie-king-builds…

    Shemya Attu Agattu NGeo

    8/27/2006 07:23 PM


    Comment about River camp

    csking has posted a comment:

    The exposed barren slope on the right may be the same slope shown in the later photo titled “blasting.” If so, that picture may be incorrectly noted as having possibly been at the 1,040-foot Slim’s River crossing. On the other hand, this could be the same crossing which from this distant perspective makes the width of the river seem less than a thousand feet. Quien sabe?

    River camp

    8/27/2006 10:24 AM


    Comment about Scan7281

    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    Scan7281

    8/24/2006 05:31 PM


    Comment about plank bridge, finished
    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects. This appears to be at the time of “draggin’ up” and on to the next camp.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    plank bridge, finished

    8/24/2006 05:27 PM


    Comment about Plank bridge, side view
    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects. This would appear to have been taken upon completion.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    Plank bridge, side view

    8/24/2006 05:23 PM


    Comment about plank bridge
    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    plank bridge

    8/24/2006 05:05 PM


    Comment about blasting, csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    blasting

    8/24/2006 05:04 PM |


    Comment about major river crossing

    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    major river crossing

    8/24/2006 04:59 PM |


    Comment about major river crossing

    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    major river crossing

    8/24/2006 04:58 PM


    Comment about major river crossing, blasting

    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    major river crossing, blasting

    8/24/2006 04:57 PM


    Comment about major river crossing, staging

    csking has posted a comment:

    One of several pictures that seem to be of the same construction project which may be the 1,040-foot Slim’s River Bridge noted in the record as one of the more time consuming projects.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Engineers during the construction of the AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    major river crossing, staging

    8/24/2006 04:56 PM


    Comment about Plane crash 1-a

    csking has posted a comment:

    From other reading I’ve done on how the route was determined, a lot of the flying was done by a guy personally contracted by the General in charge who flew along…one General Hoge (sp?) till he went on to notable successes in Europe after having been replaced. This pilot is described in the most stellar terms by the general. I didn’t read the whole narrative but I didn’t see any reference to his plane ever having crashed.

    Plane crash 1-a

    8/24/2006 04:46 PM


    Comment about Plank bridge

    csking has posted a comment:

    Gruscana has added several more to the original two. I sent when I realized that they were almost certainly of the same project and would provide an interesting progression from the picture showing where they had decided to cross and the final convoy crossing the bridge and on to the next camp and project.

    I can’t help but wonder what was next and remember the picture of the North River project (many miles and bridges later) in another picture that was done in the dead of winter. In line with that I remember the first time I heard Dad convey the universal sentiment contained in the saying, “things can always get worse.” I think his actual words were, “Things are never as bad as they seem,” as he tried to assuage some silly childhood concern.

    Plank bridge

    8/24/2006 11:15 AM


    Comment about Plank bridge

    csking has posted a comment:

    Some of the pictures in this sequence, and out of sequence, could be of the construction of the 1,040 foot Slim’s River Bridge mentioned on page 12 of “Building the Road to Alaska.” Quoting from the document, “Few obstacles slowed construction except the major water courses, such as Slim’s River which required the 18th Engineers to build a 1,040-foot pile stringer bridge and the 340th’s bridge over the Rancheria River.”

    Plank bridge

    8/24/2006 11:09 AM


    Comment about Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

    csking has posted a comment:

    Picture #10 labeled “Canyon Creek Bridge” at another Internet site is apparently the same bridge.

    Pictures are a subset of this site and accessible by clicking on the “Pictures” button:

    www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/9977/

    Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

    8/24/2006 10:46 AM


    Comment about equipment, road grader

    csking has posted a comment:

    All the other pictures of abandoned equipment and ordinance are also interesting.

    equipment, road grader

    8/24/2006 07:16 AM


    Comment about Bridges

    csking has posted a comment:

    Subsequent to my note above I found an authoritative reference to the number of bridges the 18th Engineers constructed in a U.S. Army historical called, “Building the Road to Alaska.” Page 128 of that document (page 12 of 19 by the Acrobat Reader page counter) states the following:

    “The effort expended on bridges and culverts was significant — in the 95 miles fom the Aishihik River to Kluane Lake, the 18th Engineers built 225 stringer bridges, an A-frame at Aishihik, 2 pile stringer bridges, and 138 timber box culverts.” Quote is from the follwing (pdf file):

    www.usace.army.mil/publications/eng-pamphlets/ep870-1-42/…

    This, of course, is only the number of bridges and culverts constructed over that stretch of the highway.

    Bridges

    8/23/2006 06:54 AM


    Comment about equipment, road grader

    Gruscana has posted a comment:

    There’s a picture of one of these, 60 years later on the Aleutians, Attu040601-024.jpg

    equipment, road grader

    8/21/2006 11:58 PM


    Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

    Gruscana has posted a comment:

    There’s a photo of the Marston matting used for the airstrips (importance discussed in thesis), here
    static.flickr.com/33/48492349_59c8572ed3.jpg?v=0
    from the entire set of contemporary photos of Aleutians war sites.
    WWII in the Aleutians (Set)

    The Williwaw Wail page 5

    8/21/2006 11:42 PM


    Comment about Joe Longo

    csking has posted a comment:

    This barracks photo of another GI cleaining his M1 Garand was probably taken near the end of the war at Ft. Belvoir, VA after 18th Engineers returned to the states from Alaska and The Aleutians.

    Notice what appears to be a shiney steel butt plate on the rifle which could indicate an upcoming parade review…possibly the last one.

    Joe Longo

    8/21/2006 08:49 AM


    Comment about Pack Train Inn, Skagway

    csking has posted a comment:

    “Skagway is … considered the northern most point in Southeast Alaska, 80 air miles from Juneau and 110 road miles from Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada.”

    From a history of Skagway as found on the Internet:

    “1942 – Skagway is literally invaded by U.S. Army troops, who take over the railroad for a major supply route to build the Alcan Highway. The tracks are moved off Broadway and as many as 20 trains a day climb the pass. Over the next three years as many as 3,000 troops are stationed here. Vacant lots sprout rounded Quonset huts and H buildings. A pipeline is constructed along railway for fuel shipments.”

    Pack Train Inn, Skagway

    8/21/2006 08:38 AM


    Comment about 60 below

    csking has posted a comment:

    Based on other photographs with notations, the guy on left appears to be William (Bob) E. Porter from Yazoo City, Mississippi and the other Stanwood A. Murphy from San Francisco.

    Dad spoke a few times of the danger associated with even the most brief exposure of bare flesh to these temperatures. For my Brother and me the most frightening and memorable was his description of the dangers associated with going to the latrine.

    A historical narrative I’ve seen recently stated that there was a low temperature recorded somewhere along the Al-Can during its construction of seventy below zero.

    60 below

    8/21/2006 07:11 AM


    Comment about G McCalla, YT

    csking has posted a comment:

    G. McCalla, Yukon Territory, somewhere along the AlCan Highway during W.W. II. Photo taken my Father, Charles King.

    I’ve gone back and looked in Dad’s photo album and found this man’s bold signature on the first page of three containing twenty-seven signatures and hometowns (some addresses and prepended four-digit phone numbers also…i.e., Mayfair 9139 for one Harry R. Nagel) of friends. The “G” is for George and his hometown is stated as “Phila – Penna.”

    Interestingly, every signature is legible and in keeping with the standard handwriting techniques taught in school at that time…and probably to this day for that matter. I’d bet that sixty years later any such list of twenty-seven different signatures of men of this age group (in or out of the service and of any demographic) might reveal the actual names of fifteen to twenty.

    G McCalla, YT

    8/21/2006 06:12 AM


    Comment about Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

    csking has posted a comment:

    First of two pictures of the same bridge. Note the log cabins in the background of this one.

    Canyon Creek Bridge, 1942

    8/21/2006 05:15 AM


    Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

    Gruscana has posted a comment:

    Williwaw. Williwaw is the [NOT] Aleut word for the violent, hurricane force winds in the region which can exceed 100 miles per hour.”

    Weather as the Decisive Factor of the Aleutian Campaign, June 1942 – August 1943
    A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE, 1993
    CAROL A. WILDER, LCDR, USN
    tinyurl.com/zmbs4

    Not an Aleut word, according to Dr Lydia Black who knows.

    The Williwaw Wail page 5

    8/20/2006 09:33 PM


    Comment about The Williwaw Wail page 5

    csking has posted a comment:

    The following is a short contextual definition of WILLIWAW as taken from what I believe is a U.S. Army historical narrative of the a landing on the Aleutian Island of Amchitka:

    “Just surviving the weather on Amchitka was a challenge. During the first night ashore, a “willowaw” (a violent squall) smashed many of the landing boats and swept a troop transport aground.”

    Internet address for the whole well written pictorial narrative entitled “Aleutians – The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II is as follows:

    Aleutians – The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II

    The Williwaw Wail page 5

    8/20/2006 09:55 AM


    Comment about Shemya2 (back)

    csking has posted a comment:

    Back side of the next photograph in series. I’ve recently seen a photograph posted by the son of another AlCan vet at another site that shows the hooch looking little ramshackle place that was the Shemya photo shop where this was no doubt developed and stamped.

    photo and script by Tec V, Charles King, 18th Combat Engineers

    Shemya2 (back)

    8/19/2006 11:15 AM


    Comment about White River, YT winter

    csking has posted a comment:

    I don’t know how wide or deep The White River is but it seems to me it would be difficult to overstate the difficulty of constructing almost any size bridge in what appears to be the dead of a Yukon winter.

    Photo and script by Tec V, Charlie King, 18th Combat Engineers, AlCan Highway, W.W. II.

    White River, YT winter

    8/19/2006 11:05 AM


    Comment about Handling logs for bridge

    csking has posted a comment:

    To the extent I ever wondered why Dad knew so much about this kind of equipment (winches, gin-pole trucks, cranes, etc.), these pictures answer the question.

    Photo by Tec V, Charlie King, AlCan Highway construction, W.W. II

    Handling logs for bridge

    8/19/2006 10:54 AM


    Comment about River camp

    csking has posted a comment:

    Judging from what appears to vehicles or an encampment on the other side of the river, this is no doubt a view of the point at which a bridge was to be constructed.

    Photo by Tec V, Charles King, AlCan Highway construction, W.W. II.

    River camp

    8/19/2006 10:43 AM


    Comment about Scan754

    csking has posted a comment:

    Picture one of two in a series — herewith showing the bridge under construction and then finished (or at least passable to vehicular traffic) in the second picture (next in this series…as it is now).

    Photo by Tec V Charlie King, Alcan Highway construcion, W.W. II

    Scan754

    8/19/2006 10:37 AM


    Comment about Scan7161

    csking has posted a comment:

    Not visible in this picture is what is likely chains connecting this series of vehicles together as they’re being pulled through the muck by the Caterpillar D-9 up front. I’ve zoomed in on this picture to see if the driver of the cat is my Dad, Charlie King. It’s indeterminable but it probably is with the photo taken by a friend in the truck…somewhere on AlCan Highway during W.W. II.

    Scan7161

    8/19/2006 10:29 AM


    Comment about Scan7321

    csking has posted a comment:

    From a recently read a transcription of an interview of Brigadier General William M. Hoge (one of the Commanding Generals of the Alaska Highway project), he states that their original road cutting methodology that called for a 100 foot wide clearing through the forests for the roadway was too wide because it let too much sunlight in which allowed the muskeg or permafrost to melt. The problem wasn’t immediately apparent and discovered only after the road was found to be impassable on a return trip days or weeks later. Even after the road clearing width had been reduced to twenty-five feet they still had to lay the cleared trees down in a corduroy fashion in some places.

    The Hoge interview address is: (pdf file)
    www.usace.army.mil/publications/eng-pamphlets/ep870-1-25/…

    Scan7321

    8/19/2006 10:19 AM


    Comment about Shemya3

    csking has posted a comment:

    Dad spoke of Agatu also but I think only as an island he saw from a distance.

    Shemya3

    8/14/2006 09:29 AM


    Comment about Shemya2 1944

    csking has posted a comment:

    Backside noted by Tec V Charlie King:

    Shemya, Aleutian Island, 1944
    8/14/06 (Dad’s birthday)

    Shemya2 1944

    8/14/2006 09:27 AM


    Comment about California Training

    csking has posted a comment:

    Tec 5 Charlie King 18th Engineers in training or on maneuvers in Calfornia before deployment to Canada and Alaska for construction of the AlCan Highway. Date would be between late 1941 to 5 April 1942 which his papers say was departure date for Canada (arrived 13 April). From other photos I know that one camp where training took place was Camp Hunter Ligget in California.

    California Training

    8/10/2006 07:02 AM


    Comment about Plane crash 1-c

    csking has posted a comment:

    Thrid of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

    Plane crash 1-c

    8/1/2006 06:16 AM


    Comment about Plane crash 1-b

    csking has posted a comment:

    Second of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

    Plane crash 1-b

    8/1/2006 06:15 AM


    Comment about Plane crash 1-a

    csking has posted a comment:

    First of three pictures of this scene taken by Charlie King during the construction of the Al-Can Highway or in the Aleutians during W.W. II. I was never told anything about these photos and they weren’t annotated in any way. The plane was probably used as an observation or survey platform for determining the course the highway construction would take.

    Plane crash 1-a

    8/1/2006 06:14 AM


    Comment about Bishop’s Lodge wedding

    csking has posted a comment:

    Bishop’s Lodge is north and east of Santa Fe, New Mexico. I believe the other couple is the soon to be married Joe and Mary Staley.

    Bishop's Lodge wedding

    7/24/2006 06:13 PM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

    csking has posted a comment:

    Unknown location in the building of the Al-Can Highway. My Dad, Charlie King, may be driving the cat or he may be the one taking the picture. I believe I’ve seen this very location recently in a documentary or another picture set of the times. Location is probably easily identifiable by anybody highly familiar with the highway. It could be on Lake Kluane.

    Charlie's photos (a couple more)

    7/20/2006 06:17 AM


    Comment about CKing, The Williwaw Wail page 5

    csking has posted a comment:

    One page from an 18th Engineers news sheet. It is readable if you click on the “All Sizes” button at top and view at the “Original Size.”

    From Charlie King’s W.W. II momentos discovered by me in 2005.

    CKing, The Williwaw Wail page 5

    7/19/2006 12:41 PM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

    csking has posted a comment:

    War time grim humor during construction of the Al-Can Highway…dehumanizing / disparaging / humiliating the enemy. Not, however, the enemy they would face later on Attu in the Aleutians. Kinda’ makes you wonder if they even knew which enemy the highway was intended to defend against.

    Charlie's photos (a couple more)

    7/19/2006 12:13 PM


    Comment about Charlie King

    csking has posted a comment:

    Charlie King – photo from about 1957 or 1958.

    Charlie King

    7/19/2006 11:57 AM


    Comment about Jean Roseberry (King)

    csking has posted a comment:

    My Mother, Wanda Jean Roseberry King, in either her Junior or Senior year of High School. Only a couple of years before meeting my Father, Charlie King.

    Jean Roseberry (King)

    7/19/2006 11:55 AM


    Charlie's photos (more 9...)

    7/19/2006 11:52 AM


    Charlie's photos (more 9...)

    7/19/2006 11:51 AM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 2)

    csking has posted a comment:

    From Charles King’s war time photo album. On the left is probably from maneuvers in Calfornia before going to Alaska and the on right probably in Washington DC just prior to separation.

    Charlie's photos (more 2)

    7/19/2006 11:46 AM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (a couple more)

    csking has posted a comment:

    Sled dog – Al-Can Highway during W.W. II. Photo by Charlie King, 18th Engineers. Judging from the dog’s tail he’s not all that pleased.

    Charlie's photos (a couple more)

    7/19/2006 10:07 AM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 3)

    csking has posted a comment:

    Either Les ? or Stanwood Murphy writing letter, duty sheet, or the like during W.W. II on Alcan Highway or Aleutians.

    Charlie's photos (more 3)

    7/19/2006 10:02 AM


    Comment about Fwd: Charlie’s photos (more 3)

    csking has posted a comment:

    Duck Hunting – Stan is Stanwood Murphy from San Francisco. Dad said he was from a wealthy family. I did a search for him for Dad on the Internet and was able to find out an impassive and disinterested family member that he had passed away many years ago. Somewhere in Alaska during W.W. II. Photo by Charlie King – 18th Engineers.

    Charlie's photos (more 3)

    7/19/2006 09:56 AM


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