Search Results for 'boarding school'

Older American Indian women appeared less concerned about elder abuse than older men

http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096411912

American Indian Science and Engineering Society

AISES Science and engineering conference gathers students

Twyla Baker-Demaray, of Grand Forks, N.D., was one of several American Indian graduate students presenting their research at the conference.

Older American Indian women appeared less concerned about elder abuse than older men, said the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara graduate student. She is studying American Indian elder abuse for a master’s degree at the University of South Dakota.

Baker-Demaray conducted a survey of elders at the National Indian Council on Aging conference a year ago in Milwaukee, Wis., where 470 questionnaires were completed by American Indian elders 55 and older.
….

”The trend was basically that as our age groups went up, the older age groups showed less concern for all types of abuse than the younger, 55 years, who showed a little more concern for abuse in the communities.”

Baker-Demaray said people on the reservations or in Indian communities showed more concern for abuse than those off the reservations.

Her survey showed that older-generation females were less concerned about abuse. ”Our review showed that … overall, older-generation females are at the highest risk of abuse,” she said. ”Either they are not really talking about it, [are] not willing to talk about it, or they don’t know what it is.”

Often, that was the case, Baker-Demaray said. ”If nobody hits me, I am not being abused” is what the older women seem to say, she explained.

”It depends on what Indian nation you are talking to, [what] their definition of abuse [is]. It’s different in Alaska than it is in New Mexico. And these are all based on culture,” she said.

Baker-Demaray found that the oldest of Americans Indians studied appeared less concerned about abuse, likely because they are from the generation of government boarding schools. ”Maybe they are a bit more accepting of this type of behavior: ‘This is the status quo. This is how it always has been, and this how it always is going to be.’ They accept it,” she speculated.
….
Baker-Demaray admitted her survey was of older American Indians who were healthy enough to attend conferences. Her survey did not include those in nursing homes or in formal health care facilities, she said.

Advertisements

Pablita Velarde exhibition

Ms Velarde’s work, like Ms Martinez’
https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/09/18/american-indian-linguist/ remained controversial even late into their lives for many people [a sign of living tradition].

David Collins | For The New Mexican, February 19, 2007

A yearlong exhibition that opened Sunday at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture memorializes Santa Clara Pueblo artist Pablita Velarde the way she wanted to be remembered.

“I want the Earth to remember me through my works,” Velarde says in a DVD presentation that offers museum guests a posthumous first-person explanation of her work.

A collection of 58 paintings from the 84 works that Bandelier National Monument officials commissioned Velarde to produce between 1939 and 1945 went on display on Museum Hill. The collection is recognized as a premiere documentation of Pueblo life at that time. …

“It was because of the WPA that many artistic traditions survive today,” museum director Shelby Tisdale said.

Born in 1918 at Santa Clara as Tse Tsan, or “Golden Dawn,” Velarde’s father sent her to St. Catherine Indian School in Santa Fe when she was 5. In the eighth grade, she transferred to Santa Fe Indian School. There, she studied with Dunn, who was renowned for training a generation of American Indians for careers in art.

At the Cerrillos Road school, Velarde’s art developed in a direction that defied tradition, even as she documented and interpreted the traditions she learned from elders. …

Velarde’s work for Bandelier includes traditional motifs but relies on illustration styles and materials typical of the era. Later in her life, Velarde experimented with natural media until she perfected her own rendition of media used in ancient petroglyphs. Velarde called them earth pigments.

By her own account, Velarde battled a stigma as a woman working in a medium traditionally reserved for men until 1953, when she became the first woman to receive the prestigious Grand Purchase Award from the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Okla.

Tisdale said the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture started negotiating an exhibit of Velarde’s work for the Bandelier monument a few months before her death Jan. 10, 2006, at age 87.


Site Search Tags: , , , ,

Technorati Tags: , , , ,


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
September 2019
M T W T F S S
« May    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 195,916 visitors
Advertisements