Search Results for 'assessment'

Senior Center Self-Assessment

The Joint Committee on Senior Centers is comprised of members of the Pennsylvania Association of Senior Centers, the Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. They have a number of other resources, Learn about items of Special Interest

The following checklist has been designed to help you think about your Center from the “first impression” perspective. These are some of the things you could be looking at in your Center to prepare to make a positive, lasting impression on those who come to your Center.

If you are answering “no” to questions, you may want to look at modifying or improving that item. For best results, have a person who is unfamiliar with the Center complete the survey. Problems that we see on a daily basis can sometimes become “invisible” to our eyes.

This checklist can help prepare your Center to be in the best position possible for welcoming the new seniors who respond to the Senior Center Marketing Initiative of June 2002. Prepared by the Joint Committee on Senior Centers, February 2002.

The checklist is available as a pdf file here,

Compare this checklist with the one for the Bethel senior center, When you visit the senior center https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2005/08/06/when-you-visit-the-senior-center/ and try it out, Grabbing public toilets https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2006/10/24/grabbing-public-toilets/ or Visit Bethel Alaska’s Eddie Hoffman Senior Center

1 OUTSIDE AREAS

1. Is there clear signage identifying the location of the Center from the road?
2. Is a sign posted next to or above the entrance door to the Center so participants can easily find it upon approach to the Center?
3. Is the building exterior free from peeling paint or other repairs?
4. Is the parking lot free from debris and weeds?
5. Is the walkway and parking lot adequately lighted?
6. Are the shrubs, outside plants and lawn well maintained?
7. Are outside walkways free of hazardous objects, including debris, weeds and uneven or broken steps?
8. Is outdoor furniture clean and in good shape?
9. Is there easy access for individuals with disabilities?
10. Are rails leading to the doors secure and well maintained?
11. Are curbs painted to signify distinction of levels?
12. Is the outside of the Center attractive and inviting?

2 INSIDE AREAS

1. Is there adequate lighting in rooms, corridors, elevators and stairways?
2. Are guests acknowledged promptly when they enter your Center?
3. Would the atmosphere be characterized as pleasant?
4. Is there a pleasant smell when entering the Center?
5. Is the Center clean enough to meet your personal standards?
6. Is the area inside clutter free, not only on the floor, but also in the space surrounding it?
7. Is the furniture attractive and easy to get in and out of?
8. Is the furniture arranged to promote interaction and conversation?
9. Are magazines, books or other materials for activities neatly stacked and out of the path of travel?
10. Are curtains and window treatments clean and in good condition?
11. Is there an easy to find and easy to read bulletin board with activities, meal schedules and other current information?
12. Is the activity board or other written materials hanging at a readable level for elderly persons of different heights?
13. Are certificates and licenses posted, if required?
14. Is the lighting adequate for older persons?
15. Is the dining area attractive and inviting?
16. Are participants able to sit where they want during meal times without being assigned?
17. Is the kitchen clean and inviting?
18. Is the meal contribution policy, sign-in sheet, and contribution box easy to locate?
19. Does the noise level allow for conversations and quiet activities?

3 SAFETY

1. Are changes in floor levels or coverings distinct enough to prevent tripping?
2. Are carpets free from wear and frayed ends?
3. Are small rugs and runners slip-resistant and non-moving?
4. Are lamp, extension and telephone cords placed out of the flow of traffic?
5. Are chairs sturdy and not easily tipped?
6. Are there handrails in hallways and grab bars in bathrooms?
7. Are written emergency evacuation plans with center floor plans posted throughout the Center?
8. Is a fire extinguisher easy to find and do participants know how to use one?
9. Are emergency numbers posted near the phone?
10. Are smoke detectors properly located and in working condition?
11. Are hallways, passageways between rooms, and other heavy traffic areas equally well lit?
12. Are exits and passageways free from clutter?
13. In the kitchen area, are towels, curtains, and other things that might catch fire located away from the range?
14. Are all extension cords and appliance cords located away from the sink or range areas?
15. Are emergency exits clearly marked?
16. Is emergency lighting functional and adequate?

4 PROGRAM AND SERVICES

1. Are the Center hours and days of operation posted for participants?
2. Can Center hours be changed or altered if requested?
3. Is access to computers and the internet available?
4. Does the Center offer a wide variety of activities for different interests?
5. Are fitness activities offered regularly?
6. Are participants involved with planning activities?
7. Are costs for activities known to individuals?
8. Are other community groups or non-profits involved with Center activities?
9. Are you conducting marketing/advertising activities in your local area?
10. Are you making use of internet technology for advertising?
11. Are newsletters listing activities and menus given or sent to participants on a regular basis?
12. Is there a posted calendar of activities or a newsletter available for people who enter the Center?
13. Are new participants given an orientation to the Center?
14. Is there a welcoming committee made up of current participants to help make newcomers feel comfortable?


Technorati Tags: , , ,
Site Search Tags: , , ,

Nursing Resources Assessment Tools

Geriatric Nursing Resources for Care of Older Adults: Assessment Tools [pdf]

For nurses interested in keeping up to date with developments in geriatric treatment, this set of resources created by expert practitioners will be quite a find. The entire site was developed as part of the Nurse Competence in Aging initiative created by the American Nurses Association. Here, visitors can read over twenty-five two-page assessment tools that include such helpful titles as “Assessing Nutrition in Older Adults”, “Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk”, and “Immunizations for the Older Adult”. Written in clear and direct language, these resources will also be of assistance for nursing educators and those who are responsible for professional development workshops. It is also worth mentioning that these short tools are designed as screening tools, and are not for diagnosis. [KMG]

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2007.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

Try This, a publication of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, is a series of assessment tools where each issue focuses on a topic specific to the older adult population. The goal of the Try This: Best Practices in Care for Older Adults series of assessment tools is to provide knowledge of best practices in the care of older adults that is:

* easily accessible
* easily understood
* easily implemented, and
* to encourage the use of these best practices by all direct care nurses


Site Search Tags: ,

EPA community self-assessment

The EPA and its partners have developed a self-assessment tool for communities to build healthy communities for active aging. The tool provides resources for communities to create a healthy community for active aging.

Click on the hyperlink to each question to get to the more useful parts. For example, http://epa.gov/aging/bhc/smart/ question01.htm Otherwise, the “self-assessment” isn’t useful as a workbook.

powered by performancing firefox


Site Search Tags: , , ,

SNAQ Assessment Tool

Here is the quick survey referred to in news reports.

http://www.slu.edu/readstory/newslink/6349

“Four Questions That May Save Your Grandma?s Life: SNAQ Screening Tool Predicts Weight Loss

ST. LOUIS — A four-question screening tool can predict which older patients with appetite problems are likely to lose weight, placing them at greater risk of death, according to Saint Louis University research.

The questionnaire is called the SNAQ (pronounced snack), the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire, and takes less than two minutes to answer.

?This tool tells us whether a poor appetite is likely to kill you. It identifies the patients who have problems with their appetite and will go on to lose weight,? says Margaret-Mary Wilson, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine and geriatrics at Saint Louis University and lead author.

?The watch-and-wait approach is dangerous when it comes to weight loss in older adults. We?re dealing with a problem that can be fatal.? ”
http://www.slu.edu/readstory/more/6348

December 13, 2005 SNAQ Assessment Tool
My appetite is
1. very poor
2. poor
3. average
4. good
5. very good

When I eat
1. I feel full after eating only a few mouthfuls
2. I feel full after eating about a third of a meal
3. I feel full after eating over half a meal
4. I feel full after eating most of the meal
5. I hardly ever feel full

Food tastes
1. very bad
2. bad
3. average
4. good
5. very good

Normally I eat
1. less than one meal a day
2. one meal a day
3. two meals a day
4. three meals a day
5. more than three meals a day

Tally the results based on the following numerical scale: a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, e = 5. The sum of the scores for the individual items constitutes the SNAQ score. SNAQ score ?14 indicates significant risk of at least 5 % weight loss within six months.

Elder Abuse and Neglect Assessment

NOTE: To view the article with Web enhancements, go to:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/493951

Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, GNP, FAAN
Dermatol Nurs 16(5):473, 2004. &#A9; 2004 Jannetti Publications, Inc. Posted 12/17/2004

….
Elder abuse and neglect is a serious and prevalent problem that is estimated to affect 700,000 to 1.2 million older adults annually in this country. Only one in ten cases of elder abuse and neglect are reported and there is a serious underreporting by clinical professionals, likely due to the lack of appropriate screening instruments. Abuse, neglect, exploitation and abandonment are actions that can result in elder mistreatment (EM).

Best Tools
The Elder Assessment Instrument (EAI),[1,2,3] a 41-item Likert scale assessment instrument that has been in the literature since 1984. This instrument is comprised of seven sections that reviews signs, symptoms and subjective complaints of elder abuse, neglect, exploitation and abandonment. There is no “score”. A patient should be referred to social services if the following exists:

1. if there is any evidence of mistreatment without sufficient clinical explanation
2. whenever there is a subjective complaint by the elder of EM
3. whenever the clinician believes there is high risk or probable abuse, neglect, exploitation, abandonment

Target Population
The EAI is appropriate in all clinical settings and is completed by clinicians that are responsible for screening for elder mistreatment.

Validity/Reliability
The EAI has been used since the early 1980’s. The internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha) is reported at 0.84 in a sample of 501 older adults who presented in an emergency department setting. Test/retest reliability is reported at 0.83 [P less than 0.0001].

The instrument is reported to be highly sensitive and less specific. Strengths and Limitations The major strengths of the EAI are its rapid assessment capacity (the instrument takes approximately 12-15 minutes) and the way that it sensitizes the clinician to screening for elder mistreatment. Limitations include: no scoring system and weak specificity….

I. General Assessment
Very Good// Good// Poor// Very Poor// Unable to Assess
1. Clothing
2. Hygiene
3. Nutrition
4. Skin integrity
5. Additional Comments:

II. Possible Abuse Indicators
No Evidence Possible// Evidence Probable// Evidence Definite// Evidence Unable to Assess
6. Bruising
7. Lacerations
9. Various stages of healing of any bruises or fractures
10. Evidence of sexual abuse
11. Statement by elder re: abuse
12. Additional Comments:

III. Possible Neglect Indicators
No Evidence Possible// Evidence Probable// Evidence Definite// Evidence Unable to Assess
13. Contractures
14. Decubiti
15. Dehydration
16. Diarrhea
17. Depression
18. Impaction
19. Malnutrition
20. Urine burns
21. Poor hygiene
22. Failure to respond to warning of obvious disease
23. Inappropriate medications (under/ over)
24. Repetitive hospital admissions due to probable failure of health care surveillance
25. Statement by elder re: neglect
26. Additional Comments:

IV. Possible Exploitation Indicators
No Evidence Possible// Evidence Probable// Evidence Definite// Evidence Unable to Assess
27. Misuse of money
28. Evidence of financial exploitation
29. Reports of demands for goods in exchange for services
30. Inability to account for money/ property
31. Statement by elder re: exploitation
32. Additional Comments:

V. Possible Abandonment Indicators
No Evidence Possible// Evidence Probable// Evidence Definite// Evidence Unable to Assess
33. Evidence that a caretaker has withdrawn care precipitously without alternate arrangements
34. Evidence that elder is left alone in an unsafe environment for extended periods of time without adequate support
35. Statement by elder re: abandonment
36. Additional Comments:

VI. Summary
No Evidence Possible// Evidence Probable// Evidence Definite// Evidence Unable to Assess
37. Evidence of abuse
38. Evidence of neglect
39. Evidence of exploitation
40. Evidence of abandonment
41. Additional Comments:


Technorati Tags: , , ,

Next Page »


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
November 2019
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 196,686 visitors