Search Results for 'aging in place'

HEALTHY COMMUNITIES FOR ACTIVE AGING GRANTS

I would love to help develop this, but grants aren’t made to individuals.

from WHAT’S UP – October 15, 2008
Compiled Weekly by Peg Tileston On behalf of the Alaska Women’s Environmental Network (AWEN), Alaska Center for the Environment (ACE), and Alaska Conservation Alliance (ACA)

*November 21
Deadline for proposal submission for THE EPA BUILD HEALTHY COMMUNITIES FOR ACTIVE AGING GRANTS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to award in early 2009, two grants for $100,000 each to train older adults to be environmental leaders and demonstrate how greenways and sustainable streets can improve the environment, human health and the quality of life for persons of all ages. Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging Training and Demonstration Projects must include a strategy that either 1) trains older adults to be environmental leaders on local planning decisions that affect their community’s built environment; or 2) demonstrates how greenways and sustainable streets can improve the quality of life for persons of all ages while improving environmental quality. For purposes of this RFP Greenways and Sustainable Streets are defined as follows: Greenways are linear corridors of open space. They include natural corridors (e.g., along a stream, river, or ridge), canals, rail road rights of way converted to recreational use, and trails. They link places together, inviting city and community residents to experience a connection with the natural environment. Greenways connect neighborhoods, downtowns, schools, community centers, and other important public places. They can include waterfront walkways, stream corridors and other natural ecological reserves, as well as off-street biking and walking paths. Sustainable Streets are a multimodal rights-of-way designed and operated to create benefits to mobility, community and ecology. They are streets that use sustainable design principles that promote safe, least-polluting ways to connect people and incorporate natural, landscape-based methods that infiltrate, reuse, or evaportranspirate (allow water to evaporate back into the air) stormwater runoff, and mitigate the “urban heat island effect” (the additional heating in the air over a city as the result of replacement of vegetated surfaces with those composed of heat-retaining, man-made materials such as asphalt and dark colored roofing). Eligible entities include States, or state agencies, the District of Columbia, territories, American Indian Tribes (federally recognized), and possessions of the U.S. It is also available to public and private universities and colleges, hospitals, laboratories, other public or private nonprofit institutions, and 501(c)(3) organizations. For more information, go to http://www.epa.gov/aging/grants/index.htm#2008_1121_grant_1.


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Winners 2007 Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging

Seven winning communities and government agencies from around the country are the recipients of the first-ever Building Healthy Communities for Active Aging awards. The award program recognizes outstanding community planning and strategies that support active aging and smart growth, thereby improving the quality of life of older adults.

By adopting smart growth principles, communities can design places that increase mobility and improve quality of life for older adults. Pedestrian-friendly, level walkways also increase access to these amenities and encourage older residents to walk to the doctor’s office or local stores. By providing a range of housing opportunities, communities can enable residents to move within their neighborhood as their housing needs change. Such life-long residents help to establish a strong sense of place within a community. The benefits of building healthy communities for active aging are being realized in communities across the country.

There are two award categories: the Commitment Award recognizes communities that have developed and begun to initiate a specific plan to implement smart growth principles and active aging concepts; the Achievement Award recognizes overall excellence in building healthy communities for active aging.

The 2007 Achievement Award winners are the Atlanta Regional Commission and the City of Kirkland, Washington. The 2007 Commitment Award winners included: City of Rogers Adult Wellness Center, Arkansas; Carver County Public Health, Carver County, Minnesota; Town of Scarborough, Maine; Queen Anne’s County Housing and Community Development, Maryland; Brazos Valley Council of Governments, Texas. For information about the winners see awards booklet at: http://www.epa.gov/aging/bhc/awards/2007/index.html

from February 2008 U.S. EPA Aging Initiative List Serve, http://www.epa.gov/aging/resources/

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nesting in place

Liz Taylor’s articles are linked on the sidebar. She practices aging in place, too.

By Rebecca Teagarden

LIZ TAYLOR IS a specialist in matters of aging and long-term care…. “Let’s talk about what the boomers need to think about as 77 million of us grow old — in a society that’s not at all prepared,” she says.

“It’s not one thing, but a combination — and more attitude and planning than architectural. When I see older people moving into two- and three-story humongous houses all around me, I think living on one level is probably the most important thing you can do to age in place.

“That, and exercise!”

… I’m almost ready for the rest of my life.”

“Almost” means Taylor wants to make her property available to friends, perhaps building two or three more small houses there so the group can care for each other or possibly share a caregiver.

Taylor would offer part of her house, either the main house or the B&B suite, to the caregiver. She hopes that attractive housing will attract more caregiving candidates. To pay for the help, Taylor bought long-term-care insurance seven years ago. She also serves on an island task force planning for Bainbridge’s growth over the next 20 years. She is working to change island zoning and sewer ordinances to permit such huddled housing….

Aging and Toxic Response (EPA review)

from the list-serv, EPA Aging List Serve, August 2006

Aging and Toxic Response: Issues Relevant to Risk Assessment
Continue reading ‘Aging and Toxic Response (EPA review)’

new life-course for an aging society

There needs to be an adjustment of living to fit the lifespan, but this seems an incomplete assessment. For example, if older workers weren’t discriminated against in hiring and in employment quality, I doubt there would be so few participating in work. The other bizarre aspect of changing demography, at least in the USA, is the voiced-in-public wondering Where is the educated workforce (and the post-bachelors educated)? I’d believe more in this “brains deficit” if I didn’t know so many bright people who are under- and un-employed against their will.

Of particular significance to western Alaska or any other small island developing state or rural province is the need as well to adjust social living to fit space. That is, many people, traditionally or as a “modern” adaptation, have seasonal residences. People work in one location, sleep in another or visit relatives and friends throughout an annual or multi-annual round. Remittances are sent around; children are sent around; knowledge is sent around. (Global kula ring)
Continue reading ‘new life-course for an aging society’

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Old age isn't a disease.

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