Search Results for 'YKHC'

Alaska day program first national center of excellence (not Bethel)

This is outstanding and goes along with our nationally certified senior center in Kodiak.

Salvation Army center lauded for dementia care program

The Salvation Army Serendipity Adult Day Center in Anchorage has received the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America award as an “Excellence in Care Dementia Program of Distinction.” The Salvation Army center is the first adult day care to receive the national honor. The center offers meaningful activities daily to about 30 adults with special needs, the foundation said. The award “validates what I feel is the culmination of years of hard work constantly trying to be on the cutting edge of new and innovative ideas in working with individuals who live with dementia and their families,” said Jesalyn Stanton, the center’s executive director. […]
Published: January 1st, 2008 http://www.adn.com/money/story/251697.html

Press release

NEW YORK, NY – The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) recently awarded its “Excellence in Care Dementia Program of Distinction” status to the nation’s first adult day center and three more assisted living facilities that have achieved AFA’s nationwide standard of excellence for facilities that provide care to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related illnesses. The Salvation Army Serendipity Adult Day Center, Anchorage, AK, is the first adult day center to receive the distinction. Also awarded Excellence in Care status are the memory care units within these facilities: Warwick Forest, Newport News, VA; The Catholic Care Center, Bel Aire, KS; and The Birches, Clarendon Hills, IL. […]

For more information about Excellence in Care, visit www.excellenceincare.org or call 866-AFA-8484.

In Bethel, we’ve made some progress. Those in the day program are no longer segregated to the loft upstairs. It also seems that older people are no longer forced to enroll in the program (in order to bring in more Medicaid money). The same old puzzles and BINGO are available for everyone.

The assisted living home is still promised by the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. — to open in 2005 next to the assisted living home built in 1997 by AVCP Housing and never used as such (then promised to start construction in 2006 for 2008 opening https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/2007/01/21/bethels-assisted-living-home-construction-2006/) and now promised for 2nnn Bethel senior day center sign

In the meantime, the City of Bethel raised the sales tax by 20% starting next week– not to fund senior programs or public transportation or disaster preparedness or public infrastructure or to keep the utility rates from going up, but for annual maintenance of a not-yet built swimming pool. As one local elite stated, the poor and elders won’t feel the regressive tax because they get food stamps.

The tax increase won’t go towards any improvement in “community policing” either. Bethel relies heavily on the police to do the things neighbors, family, and friends would rather not. There are now 3 police officers, instead of 12. The elder abuse hot line [1-800-478-9996] was forewarned last August when this became obvious. Unfortunately, the State of Alaska elder abuse hotline is just one person, although assisted by one or two field investigators.


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Gladys Jung nonagenarian

5-9-07, by Greg Lincoln, Delta Discovery

Beloved elder Gladys Jung of Bethel celebrated her 90th birthday last week. Many friends and loved ones came to wish her a happy birthday at her comfortable home near the Kuskokwim River.

Gladys was born on April 30, 1917 in St. Michael to parents Oscar and Annie Hall. Her mother was from St. Michael and her father was from West Virginia. … Gladys is a University of Alaska Fairbanks Alumna, graduating from college with a teaching degree. She returned home where she taught in the old village of Nunacuaq, which has long been gone. In Nunacuaq she worked as an apprentice teacher. She remembers burning coal in the stove for heat. The teacher she worked with had the main school and she would send the little ones to Gladys, who was learning how to teach.

“There were no chairs and the kids would stand at the table and do their work,” she said.… Shortly after, she married Henry Jung and together they had nine children. The couple was asked to open the school in Napaskiak, which had not had a school before.

“My husband made little tables, there were no desks,” she recalls. “We traveled by dog team and by […]

Gladys was also an active member of the Senior Center. A few years ago she recorded a radio ad against the use of iq’mik (sometimes ikmik), a mixture of chewing tobacco and “punk” or tree fungus ash, which is used by adults and even children. She then became known to the latest group of schoolchildren as the “Iq’mik Lady”
Gladys Jung iq’mik YKHC ad


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    Bethel’s assisted living home construction 2006

    July 15, 2006
    Assisted living home construction could begin soon
    By Katie Baldwin, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp.

    Construction on an Assisted Living Home in the YK Delta for elders and adults with disabilities may be just beyond the horizon….

    Currently, elders who need this type of comprehensive health care are forced to move to facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks….

    In November of 2001, several local agencies met to discuss the establishment of an assisted living home in Bethel. … Preliminary drawings were made and the City of Bethel approved a 30-year land lease at a site located south of the Lu-Lu Herron Building [sic] on Ptarmigan street.

    YKHC has obtained $8.3 million to fund the project. However, the funding requires a 30 percent match. …

    The 18-bed facility will be a congregate residential setting with personal and health care services, including 24-hour supervision and assistance.

    At the request of the Denali Commission, Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation resubmitted their business plan on Friday, June 30. Construction plans will be made later this summer, pending the Denali Commission’s final analysis.

    The anticipated completion of the project is 2008.

    Lulu Heron Congregate Home was opened in 1997, and is built and run by AVCP Regional Housing Corp. It was supposed to be the long-awaited assisted living housing. For some reason, it was never deemed as meeting regulations for an AL facility. It is currently just rental housing, although the elderly and low-income get first crack. To the left in the photo is the location of the assisted living home to be built by Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. and the City of Bethel. It was promised to open Sept 2005!!

    [The Betty Guy Memorial Nursing Home Fund is an entirely separate project of volunteers, deliberately NOT affiliated with the city or other local institutions. People have been collecting money for this much needed facility for over 10 years. The effort is locally run, organized, and will be controlled by the elderlies themselves. Those wishing to, may contribute to the fund at First National Bank in Bethel, Alaska.]

    38 0109 front

    Ethnic stereotyping and ageism

    The post office box this week held an issue of the New Yorker which generated mixed feelings. Many New Yorker cartoons (http://www.cartoonbank.com/) are funny because they skewer our fallacies and foibles using the stereotypes we all have about each other. Most of the stereotypes protrayed are of rich white folk.

    This recent cartoon is funny because it reveals the biased attitude many employers have towards older workers. Unfortunately, the medium of expressing a worthy idea is based upon an ethnic stereotype which is problematic, at the best.


    by Lee Lorenz

    Hold it—we almost forgot his benefits package.” (Two eskimos sending a third out to sea on a small slab of ice.)

    ID: 122851, Published in The New Yorker September 11, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/fzgsq

    The stereotype underlying the cartoon’s point about ageism is false. Recently we had a physician lie about just such a scenario, up north. People were quite hurt by the accusation.

    JAMA falls foul of fabricated suicide story [JAMA is Journal of the American Medical Association]

    by Deborah Josefson, San Francisco

    An essay published in JAMA’s Piece of my Mind section, has stirred controversy after it was revealed that the events depicted in it were fictional.

    The essay was written by a medical student, Shetal Shah, and appeared last October (JAMA 2000;284:1897-8). In his essay, Mr Shah described an encounter with a 97 year old Inuit [sic. Eskimo people live in Alaska and Inuit people live in Canada.] man, a toothless elderly member of the Siberian Yupik tribe, who, feeling useless, came to say goodbye to the young medical student before committing suicide by walking off into a frozen tundra in the morning fog.

    In a letter to JAMA, Dr Michael Swenson, a physician with Norton Health Sound in Nome, Alaska, and Shah’s tutor during his elective, denied the existence of such a patient. Moreover, Dr Swenson charged that Mr Shah’s false account promulgates false stereotypes about the Inuit people and perpetuates ancient myths…. Dr Swenson said that he understood Mr Shah’s tweaking of events to make them more of a story but said that the account was entirely fictional and as such reflected more of our culture’s prejudices towards elderly people than those of the Siberian Yupik….

    Read the story in the British Medical Journal, on-line here

    http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/323/7311/472/a

    I’m not sure there is any evidence for any such a scenario in the past, except maybe under extreme conditions of long ago.

    Certainly, such a slur against a large group of US citizens should not have been printed in the New Yorker. As the response to the BMJ article said,

    When will medical journals learn to leave anecdotes for Cosmopolitan and fictionalized accounts for the New Yorker? The author’s explanatory note is lame in the extreme. BMJ 2001;323:472 ( 1 September )

    On the other hand, I am not as troubled by Sam Gross’ cartoon at the bottom, in part because he skewers every stereotype and in part because it highlights so well the predominant establishment attitude around here about caring and valuing older people.

    This is 2006. We have no nursing home; we had an assisted living residence, which was never used as such. Another assisted living residence was promised to open September 2005. After several people inquired publicly, the health corp. finally announced it might open in 2008.

    July 15, 2006, Assisted living home construction could begin soon

    Construction on an Assisted Living Home in the YK Delta for elders and adults with disabilities may be just beyond the horizon.

    “Establishing an assisted living home is important because we have an aging population in our region and we don’t have a facility where we can take care of them properly,” said Gene Peltola, CEO of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation.

    Despite the fact that the elderly make up one of the fastest growing populations in the YK Delta, the region remains as the only area in Alaska that has no long-term assisted living facility.

    http://www.ykhc.org/1253.cfm

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    by Danny Shanahan

    “Remember, son, it’s never too early to start saving for retirement.” (Father talking to son as he pushes an elderly Eskimo out to sea on an ice floe.)

    ID: 46757, Published in The New Yorker November 26, 2001, http://tinyurl.com/gqwvu

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    by Christopher Weyant

    “It’s your mother. She’s floated back.” (Two eskimos watch a third float back on his ice floe.)

    ID: 122883, Published in The New Yorker September 18, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/znx2s

    I have never appreciated mother-in-law jokes as they are inherently misogynist. The above is next week’s New Yorker take on Eskimos.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    by Sam Gross

    “Are you sure this ice floe is going to pass by the nursing home?” (Elderly Eskimo on ice floe shouts back to family who are waving good-bye.)

    ID: 42864, Published in The New Yorker November 22, 1999, http://tinyurl.com/j6soq

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ann Fienup-Riordan, Ph.D. has explored Alaska Eskimo stereotypes and other portrayals in the movies—
    Freeze Frame book jacket

    http://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/FIEFRP.html

    “Freeze Frame, Alaska Eskimos in the Movies” by Ann Fienup-Riordan, Pub Date: August 2003,
    ISBN:Paper: 0-295-98337-X


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    Neglect of Bethel Elders again

    October 2005

    We’ve just had the third instance (at least) of an elder denied senior services (transportation) because of neglect. Adult Protective Services has been contacted each time. Cold weather is here and the elder is unable to walk home. The only two cabbies who would have conveyed him can no longer accept him (they are usually not near the senior center when the call comes in and the elder must remain outdoors waiting.) The situation is known to the senior director, who has in the past refused to speak to the cabbies reporting the neglect. The local paper Tundra Drums refused to assist in this latest instance when the cabbie went to them for information.

    Aside from APS, where do people go to change the situation? Individuals on the Senior Advisory Board have been attacked by senior services personnel when bringing the issues to public attention (even at a City Council meeting.)

    This is why older people must be active in their own lives. These are your services. When the senior services program itself denies services to elders, it is up to the rest of us to protest. We just need ideas to overcome the local news media reluctance to act; the City of Bethel’s refusal to act; and the ONC tribal government’s inaction.

    [It should also be noted that the neglect was also reported to the regional health corp. with trust responsibility, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp. (YKHC), which runs the personal care program. YKHC was supposed to have an assisted living home opened last month, too, but which doesn’t even have a footprint staked out.]


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