Search Results for 'WordPress tips'

Tips for events managers working with older people

There are limitations within various web log software (especially if one can only afford the free sites) to identify what people are interested in when they stop by. I don’t care if there are meganumbers**, but I do find it really useful to check every now and again to see what information visitors might be interested in on this site; whether they found bad links; whether they found useful information (maybe I’ve used the wrong terminology; maybe they have used the wrong terminology); etc. The readership information is useful to remind me that people from diverse backgrounds stop by so I shouldn’t use colloquialisms (or I should define them), etc.

[**Ok, the numbers matter in that once there were more than just my friends and relatives stopping by, my responsibility to keep things up-to-date, tidy, and clear increased.]

But I also like to know what else is out there that may be relevant or to find better information than what I have run across by checking out other people’s searches. Here’s a great example from someone who used http://www.google.com.au/ to search for “seating for older people” (thank you)—

“[PDF] Tips for events managers working with older people
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – View as HTML
for people with vision impairment. • Is there adequate seating for older people during. intervals? Does seating have arm-rests and a. suitable height? …
www.maca.nsw.gov.au/pdf/including_us_too!.pdf -”

Including Us Too: Tips for events managers working with older people. January 2001. Free
How do you ensure your event is designed so that older people will be able to attend and enjoy it? This is a handy guide to with practical ideas of what to do and not do to make your event popular and successful with older people. By Margaret Tucker. 16pp. ISBN 0 7313 9829 7. New South Wales [Australia] Ministerial Advisory Committee on Ageing

The tips / checklist is in pdf format, unfortunately. But it has specific questions to ask (hooray!), e.g., How many stairs do participants have to climb? and some not so specific, e.g., Is there adequate seating for frail older people to wait in comfort? Overall it is an excellent resource and really exciting to see the thought and consideration put into it.

[The html version is available from Google here, but get the original if possible. http://tinyurl.com/gxe5g]

Check out their discussion papers and other publications, too.

    A fair go, a fair share, a fair say, for older people in NSW

The NSW Ministerial Advisory Committee on Ageing regularly publishes discussion papers, reports, fact sheets and brochures. They are written for a range of audiences. Some are for community education – either for older people or for others working with older people. Other publications are discussion papers, with the aim of widening debate on a particular topic. Some are research papers, with or without recommendations to government.

http://www.maca.nsw.gov.au/publications.htm


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Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)

2003 what the City’s intentions are

2004 Nursing Homes: what LTC providers learned from battling four hurricanes

2004- Elderly in Florida at risk in every hurricane season

2006 AI/AN data report from US Census 2000

2006 National Adult Day Services Week

A push for stay-at-home healthcare

A say in one’s or other’s life?

AARP Bulletin: Blogosphere 101

AGS Foundation for Health in Aging

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Awards

Activism At All Ages

Activity and exercise

Administration on Aging Pandemic Preparation

Administration on Aging Region X: AK, ID, OR, WA

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

Age at retirement and long term survival of an industrial population BMJ

Age by decade

Continue reading ‘Alphabetical listing (mas o menos)’

Nonagenarian painter still fights for Minamata patients

Painter, 91, still fights for Minamata patients
07/20/2007, BY AYAKO TSUKIDATE, THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Kikue Wakatsuki, moved by the plight of the mercury-poisoning victims, decided to bill her customers specifically for “fund-raising,” saying their “donations” would be sent to help the patients in Minamata, Kumamoto Prefecture. No one complained.

Wakatsuki retired from the bar called Noa Noa long ago. She is now 91 years old and uses a wheelchair. But she continues to help Minamata disease victims.

Last month, Wakatsuki, who is also a painter, held her first private art exhibition in her hometown of Niigata, bringing her together with mercury-poisoning victims in the city for the first time….

Kikue Wakatsuki, 91, at her art exhibition in Niigata, greets former patrons of her bar in Tokyo’s Shinjuku district. (AYAKO TSUKIDATE/ THE ASAHI SHIMBUN)

Sanji Watanabe, 91, a Japanese folk singer who is also a victim of industrial mercury poisoning, sang in front of Wakatsuki.

Many of Wakatsuki’s fans, including former patrons of her bar in Shinjuku, showed up and danced to the music….

Minamata disease is a neurological syndrome first discovered in 1956. It is caused by consumption of marine products tainted with methyl mercury discharged from a Chisso Corp. plant into Minamata Bay. Although certified Minamata disease patients are entitled to payments for medical treatment, the standards for certification are rigid, and many sufferers have been left out.

Hideto Hatano… is also a key figure in managing the Niigata Eya art gallery, and he said he remembered hearing about Noa Noa’s manager who continued to support Minamata disease victims. When Hatano learned that Watatsuki had never held a private showing in her hometown, he invited her–and her paintings–to Niigata. […]

See also
A Case Study of a Documentary Portrait (the article discusses the impact of the Eugene Smith photo on the family under a discussion of ethics in photography)

Editor’s Note: If you wish to view the photograph discussed in this article, it is still viewable online at www.masters-of-photography.com. Click on Smith, then click through the slides to the last one, which is “Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath.”

Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thursday, Sept. 12, 2004 THE ASIAN BOOKSHELF MINAMATA DISEASE Exploring a cautionary tale By STEPHEN HESSE

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Why blog? Who, me?

Lorelle VanFossen who advocates for blogs as accessible tools (and not as look-at-me! toys) tells this interesting story of another Tolstoy’s Bicyclist. Click below to read the entire post and then visit her other work.

When a friend turned 80, she announced that she was going to buy her first computer. I asked her what she was going to do with it. She didn’t know. “Everyone was talking about it, so I thought I should get one to see what all the fuss is about. Now that I have one…” I could see her mind grinding away at the possibilities as she confronted this more-than-a-television thing….

A woman who once traveled by horse and buggy and lived the first 10 years of her life without electricity wasn’t going to let anything stop her now, not even the learning curve of new technology. […]
http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2007/06/04/are-you-blogging-your-passion-or-blogging-to-blog/

[see earlier posts, Blog readers feedback needed]

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Commenting, categories on blogs

All comments are moderated. E-mail address is NOT required; it does NOT get public. However, it sometimes helps clarify your inquiries if you leave one. Also, choose a name you are comfortable leaving for the world to view. If you leave info in the comment that is private, please indicate that. Otherwise tech support has to guess.

If you have a blog or website, include that in the form (URL) for others to find (and for us to check). Not everyone has E-mail, so that can be left blank. If you want other readers to contact you, leave a mailing address in the comment but mark it as public information.

Sometimes readers have left questions as comments or which contain information that might be inadvertently personally identifiable. Tech support deals as best as possible with these or routes them to me.

Here’s an image of a WordPress comment form (click on the rhumbnail image to get a larger view). The appearance changes depending on the theme. For other blogging platforms the comment boxes may look differently. I think the general rules apply as to “name” visibility in public (what you put is what the world sees). If the blog requires an email address, generally that is kept private by the moderator (blog owner) but one has to trust their blogger. Some comment forms allow you to get replies and further comments via E-mail (as below).

comment.jpg

Categories attached to individual entries or posts will direct the reader to other WordPress.com blogs using that category. The categories in the sidebar will show only posts from this site. The site search tags in each post or page (see below for examples) will search for those terms at this site.


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For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

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