Search Results for 'New Zealand'

Painful result with new reycling bin

The wheelie bin in New Zealand is the same as the US huge Rubbermaid-type with two back wheels which many places use for curb-side pick-up of garbage.
Wheelie bin
23 July 2005 By LEIGH van der STOEP

An 87-year-old Browns Bay man has been left with permanent damage to his elbow and a ruptured artery after taking out his recycling wheelie bin, despite North Shore City reassurances the bins are safe for the elderly.

Tony Creasey spent a week in North Shore Hospital after falling two weeks ago while taking out the recycable waste in his new blue wheelie bin, issued by the city earlier this month.

“I had to get the bin up on the pavement and there was very little to put in it. When there’s very little to put in it, it’s very unstable. When I pushed it up on to the edge of the pavement it fell over and took me with it,” he says.
….
But North Shore City maintained the bins were safer than the old blue recycling crates.
…steps have been taken to ensure the safety of the bins and various groups such as Grey Power were consulted before the new system was launched.

“As far as I’m concerned these pose less of an occupational and safety issue than carrying a heavy crate filled with glass bottles.”


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Man who rediscovered the takahe, nonagenarian

The man who refused to believe the takahe was extinct died in Dunedin on Tuesday at the age of 98.

It was assumed, when Dr. Geoffrey Orbell rediscovered the takahe in Fiordland’s Murchison Mountains in 1948, that the bird had been extinct for over 50 years. Dr. Orbell described the magical moment this way: “Suddenly I saw in a clearing in the snow grass a bird with a bright red beak and a blue and green colouring. And there, no more than twenty metres away from us stood a living Notornis, the bird that was supposed to be extinct.”

I saw takahe at Mt Bruce. It is a wonderful place to visit. The birds are about a large chicken in size.
Takahe Maungaclick to enlarge

The Associated Press, Published: August 15, 2007

WELLINGTON, New Zealand: New Zealand doctor Geoffrey Orbell, who rediscovered a flightless bird that was believed extinct almost 60 years ago, has died in the southern city of Dunedin, his family said Wednesday. He was 98.

No one had seen a live takahe — a unique blue-green, hen-like bird with a bright red bill — since the late 1890s, when Orbell and three companions found a small colony in Fiordland on South Island in November 1948. The discovery stunned the world of ornithology and made front-page news across the globe.

Geoffrey Buckland Orbell was born Oct. 7, 1908, at Pukeuri on South Island… He graduated in medicine and chemistry in 1934, then went to Moorfields Eye Hospital in London where he received a Diploma in Ophthalmic Medicine and Surgery… Orbell didn’t retire from medicine until he was 70….

Almost 300 takahe (Notornis mantelli) now live in Fiordland and other sanctuaries thanks to careful husbandry and breeding programs…. Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II made him a Member of the British Empire (MBE) in 1953

Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Chordata • Classis: Aves • Ordo: Gruiformes • Familia: Rallidae • Genus: Porphyrio

Geoffrey Orbell, a doctor who was happiest in the outdoors where he found the “extinct” takahe in 1948, has died in Dunedin just a few weeks short of his 99th birthday. Orbell was a man of many talents – ophthalmologist, cabinet maker, boat and house builder, skilled shot (founder of the NZ Deerstalkers Association), tramper, fisherman and local body politician. But above all he will be remembered for his rediscovery of the takahe, the unique and flightless blue-green, hen-like bird with the bright red bill in the depths of Fiordland. […]

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Preventive health care in elderly people needs rethinking

This sounds like it could be an interesting think-piece. Unfortunately, BMJ no longer gives free access to articles the first year. [this article was subsequently made available to the public for discussion.]

I don’t know what they mean by elderly, the oldest olds? The age group was 70-82. See comments.

BMJ 2007;335:285-287 (11 August), doi:10.1136/bmj.39241.630741.BE1
Analysis by
Dee Mangin, senior lecturer in general practice1, Kieran Sweeney, honorary clinical senior lecturer in general practice2, Iona Heath, general practitioner3

1 Christchurch School of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch New Zealand, 2 Peninsula Medical School, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter EX2 5DW, 3 Caversham Group Practice, London NW5 2UP

Dee Mangin, Kieran Sweeney, and Iona Heath argue that, rather than prolonging life, preventive treatments in elderly people simply change the cause of death—the manner of our dying

The first 150 words of the full text of this article appear below.

Summary points

* Single disease models should not be applied to preventive treatments in elderly people
* Preventive treatments in elderly people may select cause of death without the patient’s informed consent
* Preventive use of statins shows no overall benefit in elderly people as cardiovascular mortality and morbidity are replaced by cancer
* A more sophisticated model is needed to assess the benefits and harms of preventive treatment in elderly people

Preventive health care aims to delay the onset of illness and disease and to prevent untimely and premature deaths. But the theory and rhetoric of prevention do not deal with the problem of how such health care applies to people who have already exceeded an average lifespan. In recent years, concerns about equity of access to treatments have focused on ageism. As a result, preventive interventions are encouraged regardless of age, and this can be harmful to the patient and expensive for the health . . .

[Full text of this article via paid subscription only] The full text is now available.
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/short/335/7614/285?etoc

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Malietoa Tanumafili II, nonagenarian

Malietoa Tanumafili II, GCMG, CBE, (January 4, 1913 – May 11, 2007)
Head of state who guided Samoa’s journey to independence

Malietoa Tanumafili II

Malietoa had ruled the nation since it gained independence from New Zealand in 1962…. He was the world’s third-longest serving head of state, after King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand and Queen Elizabeth II….

Malietoa, who was appointed for life, was the world’s oldest head of state when he died.

He was the architect of Samoa’s constitution, under which the country’s next head of state will be selected by the legislature for a five-year term.

The Times has a more complete biography and a history of Samoa. [They call Samoa a backwater which is hardly the case in Polynesia and in contributions to science (human biology), literature, and even to Alaska and Los Angeles.]

A tribal chief, Malietoa Tanumafili II was the head of state of the tiny Pacific country of Samoa from its independence in 1962 to his death, making him the world’s third-longest serving ruler. Malietoa’s quiet dignity and reassuring presence helped to spare Samoa the political turbulence to which many other Pacific nations have succumbed. He was thought to be the world’s oldest head of state when he died…. Susuga Malietoa Tanumafili was born in 1912 and educated at the government-run Leifiifi School, then in New Zealand at St Stephen’s College, Auckland, and Wesley College, Pukekohe. When his father died in 1940, he succeeded to the Malietoa title, and was appointed an adviser to the New Zealand colonial administration…

Under the Treaty of Berlin, Samoa had passed into German hands in December 1899, while the US gained what is now called American Samoa. But at the outset of the First World War, New Zealand took control of Western Samoa, replacing Germany as the colonial master. Until 1997 it was known as Western Samoa.

See also


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Ideas to exercise in small cold places

The first story uses a computer game and the second uses school corridors. Both instances, require little funding, enhance neighborliness, and beats the old “jigsaw puzzle = elders” baloney [ Jigsaw puzzles Stave off ageism ].

The bowling story has great possibilities, especially for smaller communities or those without funding or space for analog infrastructure. It can also involve the entire family. Even though the little controller isn’t weighty, the need to control one’s swing and other movements should improve balance, hand-eye coordination, and muscle tone, as well as be fun.

Too bad Bethel never wanted the computer center that was granted, First Neighborhood Networks Center in Native Alaskan Community Opens (not)

[Look at the decent furniture! — furniture [ES&H] and ES&H Avoid dangerous furniture design principles ]


revised–2007-10-02 Boing-boing.com has very interesting stuff they find on the Internet. Here’s a photo of the use of Nintendo Wii in England. The Wii games are not only social but give immediate feedback for hand-eye control, balance, flexibility. I suppose the next trick would be to have the power for the TV and console generated by spectators. Whatever happened to shuffleboard? In England and New Zealand they play lawn bowls. I wonder if Nintendo designs other types of games?

Oldsters Help Propel Wii to Number 1
Elder gameplayers using Nintendo Wii console

Wii bowling knocks over retirement home

By Dave Wischnowsky, Tribune staff reporter
Published February 16, 2007, http://tinyurl.com/2a6nt2

At the Sedgebrook retirement community in Lincolnshire, where the average age is 77, something unexpected has been transpiring since Christmas. The residents, most of whom have never picked up a video game controller in their life, suddenly can’t put the things down.

“I’ve never been into video games,” said 72-year-old Flora Dierbach last week as her husband took a twirl with the Nintendo Wii’s bowling game. “But this is addictive.”

…With an easy-to-use wireless controller that translates a player’s motions onto the screen, Nintendo believes it has found the answer with the Wii…. “This is pretty realistic. You can even put English on the ball,” Hahn said after connecting on a strike with the Wii. “I used to play Pac-Man a little bit, but with this you’re actually moving around and doing something.

“You’re not just sitting there pushing buttons and getting carpal tunnel.”

North Pole’s senior citizens invited to take a walk
Published February 24, 2007
http://newsminer.com/2007/02/24/5468/

The … North Pole Middle School … has offered the use of their upstairs hallway for the seniors to walk while classes are in session. The classes are an hour long, giving walkers ample time to complete several rounds.

The reason for the offer is twofold: to give seniors a place to get some exercise and also to have a senior citizen presence in the school… Walkers need to check in at the front desk. There are elevators to the walking area and any student can give directions. School starts at 8 a.m. and ends at 2:30 p.m. Classes end on the hour and lunch is from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.


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