Search Results for 'Katrina'

Pets and Katrina

There has been a lot of discussion since Katrina about the role of companion animals in disaster preparation and evacuation. Animals have demonstrated advantages for the health of older people, even the very old and frail (and even as visitors than live-in companions).

Here is another aspect to the discussion.

Lost in Katrina and in new homes – whose pet now? By Patrik Jonsson, The Christian Science Monitor

…The lawsuits are efforts to reunite family members – even fuzzy ones – who have been separated by Katrina. They also raise troubling questions about whether animals should be treated as property or as members of the family – and which homes they belong in.

“We’re trying to distinguish between dog-nappers and good-faith finders, and that’s a huge gray area right now from hurricane Katrina,” says David Favre, a law professor at Michigan State University in Lansing and an animal law expert….

In many cases, overwhelmed shelters were forced to find new homes for pets that had not been claimed even after pictures were posted on the Internet….

State laws, so far, are on the side of the original owners because pets are considered property, not family, law experts say. “Finders, keepers” laws state that property must be abandoned for at least a year before original owners lose their rights to it unless the finders can prove they made a good-faith effort to find the owner. In Louisiana, the requirement is three years. In January, a New Jersey judge ordered a family to return a dog adopted after Katrina to its owner in New Orleans….

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0721/p01s03-ussc.html?s=hns


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Environmental Impacts of Hurricane Katrina

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2006. http://scout.wisc.edu/ (a most excellent resource)

Environmental Impacts of Hurricane Katrina [pdf]
http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/hurricane_katrina/

Over the past few months, a number of government agencies have worked diligently to assist those affected by Hurricane Katrina, often working in tandem with other units of government throughout the region. One agency that is working to assess the marine environmental impacts of Katrina is the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The site is fairly simple to navigate, as it essentially contains a number of links to some of the projects they are currently working on throughout the region. Some of these projects include assessments of the marine mammal and turtle health and monitoring the area for harmful algal blooms. Visitors may also wish to learn about the currently deployed vessels that are out working in the area, or they may also want to take a look at their links section. [KMG]

Katrina hit the old of all races

The Times February 18, 2006
Katrina hit the old of all races

American Association for the Advancement of Science
by Mark Henderson

THE main victims of Hurricane Katrina were not black people but older people of all races, according to research showing that almost two thirds of those who died were over 60.

Although the floods that struck New Orleans after the hurricane last August hit mainly African-American neighbourhoods, the disaster was not a disproportionate killer of black people, figures released by the St Gabriel mortuary in the city have suggested. Of 768 bodies examined so far, 64 per cent were those of people over 60. Only one was a child under 5, and among white people none of the confirmed dead was under 40.

“The truly unique signature of Katrina is the selectivity for the oldest members of the population,” said John Mutter, the deputy director of the Earth Institute, at Columbia University, in New York. “People older than 60 died in numbers about three times greater than their representation in the population. Katrina may be the first natural disaster in history to be so selective for the elderly. When it comes to deaths, this was an age-selective disaster far more than it was raceselective.”….

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Chron.com | Katrina’s toll on the sick, elderly emerges

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/3484843.html

All told, the dead from nursing homes account for about 10 percent of Louisiana deaths from the storm. Most died not as floodwaters rose or even in the immediate hours after the storm, according to interviews, but instead succumbed after days in brutal conditions. Their deaths and the effects on survivors represent the worst medical catastrophe for the elderly in recent U.S. history.

It isn’t just a medical catastrophe, but a social one if we all assume that the elderly are doing fine because they have “nice place” to live and none of us have to deal with them.

After Katrina, transplanted Creoles vow to keep culture alive

By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press writer

LOS ANGELES — Wilda Little speaks Creole with her cousin two or three times a week and listens to her favorite zydeco bands on aging vinyl records, but that’s about as close as the Louisiana transplant gets these days to the Creole culture of her youth.
‘My children never learned Creole,’ said Little, 80. ‘They were never interested in that.’

Her culture has been in a long decline here, as zydeco dance halls shut down and native Creole speakers died. And now, Hurricane Katrina has dealt these remote outposts of shrimp gumbo and the zydeco two-step a devastating blow.

Creoles who live thousands of miles from the bayous of southern Louisiana suddenly find themselves uncertain ambassadors for a city — and a way of life — that is endangered.

‘We’re a part of that culture of New Orleans and now it’s gone,’ said Norwood Clark Jr., the owner of Uncle Darrow’s Creole and Cajun restaurant in Marina del Rey.

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