Search Results for 'Alaska Native'

Gathering of Alaska Native Wisdom Bearers

I wish there were more extensive notes on the talks. But the audio/video and maybe a transcript will eventually be available.

Ethel Lund said she was a bit taken back about being called a “Wisdom Bearer.” “I feel that with gray hair, wisdom doesn’t come automatically, so I’m still in the stage of learning myself. My grandmother said you’re always learning until the day you leave and I find that to be true,” she said.

Words of Wisdom
By Robinson Duffy, Published October 25, 2007

Since 1968, the University of Alaska has awarded honorary doctorates to 43 Alaska Natives. At a meeting Wednesday morning, dubbed the Gathering of Alaska Native Wisdom Bearers, many of the surviving holders of honorary doctorates spoke in the Davis Concert Hall to an audience of high school students, visiting Alaska Natives in town for the Alaska Federation of Natives annual conference, and other community members.

The nearly four-hour meeting was recording on audio and video and will be archived by the university… More than a dozen elders spoke during the meeting. What follows are brief gems of wisdom gleaned from some of those speeches.

…The Rev. Walter Soboleff, the first Alaska Native to receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Alaska… was born in 1908 in Killisnoo.

At least two are nonagenarians. Unfortunately, Rev. David Salmon did not live long enough to give his address.


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , ,

Advertisements

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

ELDERCARE@LISTSERV.IHS.GOV

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE LONG TERM CARE CONFERENCE 2006

Honoring our Elders: Best Practices in Long Term Care

Come join us in Tulsa, Oklahoma in Honoring our Elders, Second Annual American Indian and Alaska Native Long Term Care Conference on September 18 & 19, 2006. [deadline]

Native Americans have strong family ties, traditions and a desire for independence. The rural environments where many Native Americans live are not conducive for traditional home health care models. (C. Jameson, 2006 Abstract)

This conference highlights best practices in long term care for American Indians and Alaska Natives, come and learn from the people that are making long term care work in urban and reservation communities for AI/AN Elders. Find out how to develop comprehensive services for Elders and the Disabled.

LTC Conference offers an opportunity to: form new partnerships; get new ideas; learn about Aging services and how to make it accessible for Elders; start a long term care program in your community; get family members together to plan for the well-being and safety of their Elders; or when Elders require care in urban settings due to proximity of hospitals, incorporating cultural practices and communication in the health care setting to alleviates homesickness, while assisting the Elder to become more accepting of the needed care.

The founding philosophy of the American Indian and Alaska Native Long Term Care Conference is: To honor our Elders, by learning from each other to successfully make long term care a reality in Indian Country.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers: Dr. Charles Grim, IHS Director, Ms. Carol Kelly, CMS, Chief Chad Smith, Cherokee Nation, Bill Thomas, Eden Alternative/Green House Project, Connie Bremner, Eagle Shield Senior Center,

Attend the virtual site visit for the Cherokee Nation s Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly, (PACE), Luncheon Network Sessions and much, much more.

For more conference information and registration materials please visit,

www.aianlongtermcare.org


Site Search Tags:

First Neighborhood Networks Center in Native Alaskan Community Opens

Look for this in a senior center near you! (it never opened at the Senior Center, of course. Was moved to another organization for a year or so and hasn’t been seen since.)

First Neighborhood Networks Center in Native Alaskan Community Opens

02/16/2001

Bethel, Alaska — Neighborhood Networks celebrated the dedication of the Bethel Neighborhood Networks Center, its first center to open in a Native Alaskan community, Jan. 19.

The Neighborhood Networks center also is the third to open in a Native American community, following the Santo Domingo Pueblo Library/Learning Center in Santo Domingo Pueblo, N.M., and the Akwesasne Neighborhood Networks Computer Learning Center in Hogansburg, N.Y. The first two centers opened in Oct. 2000.

The center, located in the Eddie Hoffman Senior Center near several schools and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) housing developments, will be used for computer, academic and employment training, and cultural activities. Bethel will serve over 100 people.

HUD prioritized the development of the Bethel Neighborhood Networks Center in response to a severe decline in the fishery industry, a major source of food and commercial activity, which created a hardship for those living and working in the area.

HUD presented certificates of achievement to local organizations supporting the center, including:

* The Orutsaramuit Native Council, which led the effort to establish the center
* The City of Bethel, which provided space for the center
* The AVCP Housing Authority, which contributed $25,000 in start-up funds
* AVCP, Inc., which provided technical support
* The Eddie Hoffman Senior Center, which provided staff
* The Bethel Native Corporation, which facilitated the development of the business plan and agreement for the space

For more information about Neighborhood Networks centers in Alaska, contact:

Tarrie Cooper
U.S. Department of HUD – Seattle Office
Neighborhood Networks Coordinator
Seattle Federal Office Building
909 First Avenue, Suite 190
Mailstop 0AHM
Seattle, WA 98104-1000
Phone: (206) 220-5228, ext. 3250
Fax: (206) 220-5206

Notes for the WWII Aleutians Alaska NM project

Thursday, September 02, 2004
Bataan Prisoners’ Returned to SFe’s Bruns Hospital http://tinyurl.com/j3yak

When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II or http://tinyurl.com/l49ay

Book review of Dean Kohlhoff’s When the Wind Was a River: Aleut Evacuation in World War II. Lydia T. Black, Ph.D. / Reprinted from: Pacific Historical Review v65, n4 (Nov 1996)

This book about the experience of a small group of indigenous Native American inhabitants of the Aleutian Archipelago during and after World War II. One of the villages was Atka — where the Chapel of St. Nicholas was damaged. […]


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Picturing Alaska history : USA territory to statehood

Turner Publishing (http://www.turnerpublishing.com) asked if I would consider reviewing a new book. I’m glad I agreed. Historic Photos of Alaska has just been published, a large format book of black and white photographs from the period 1867 to 1979. Dermot Cole, long-time columnist for the Fairbanks Daily Newsminer, provides the text and captions.

As a journalist, Dermot also has an interest in history (apart from his twin brother, Terrance, history professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks). Dermot Cole is the author of Amazing Pipeline Stories published by Epicenter Press in 1997, about the people and Fairbanks during the Alaska oil pipeline construction.

The perspective of Historic Photos of Alaska, is for those readers outside Alaska. That is, this is a pictorial history of Alaska as part of “America”. [Through no fault of this book, many in the US will still consider Alaska as a foreign body, along with New Mexico.]

The photos are arranged by time periods, from purchase to statehood– 1867-1905, 1906-1919, 1920-1940, and 1941-1979. These periods represent significant periods of US and Alaska relations. The orientation is a deliberate effort to stand apart from the usual Alaskana picture books. Another significant difference in this book is the choice of rarely seen photos and not the ubiquitous ones. The photos are reproduced with sufficient quality to review again and again and see something new each time.

Readers can follow themes such as regional changes (southeast Alaska also known as the Northwest Coast compared to Nome in northwest Alaska) and transportation. However, other themes can be chosen by readers according to personal interest.

    Dogs
    Most of the dogs are Alaska huskies (freight variety), such as ones on pages 44 and 55 and in harness, page 58. However, the team on page 67 is actually part of a Saami family (reindeer herders originally from Scandinavia. Note the hats and boot toes.) The harness setup is very different from that of the Eskimo family team on page 128. There are also sporting dogs (early 20th century conformation) such as the one on page 92 belonging to Jim Haly. Look carefully. The dog has just spotted another dog out of view, and kicked up a cloud of dust with his hind legs.

    Electric trees
    Even on the frozen tundra of Nome (page 111) and sprouting ever more branches over time in populated areas such as Cordova page 120 and Fairbanks page 151.

    Military
    One way to trace the influence of the military in Alaska is through men’s hats in the photos. Since Territorial days, the military has been a significant economic and development force in Alaska. Much of the early geological studies and geodetic surveys were military. World War II and then the Cold War continued the inflow of money and people. Photos from pages 168 to 180 show differing aspects of building the Al-Can or Alaska Highway and the later battles of Attu and the Aleutians. (see related posts here on the Al-Can and the Aleutians, https://theelderlies.wordpress.com/special-projects/photo-index-cking-wwii/)

    Miscellany
    Everywhere. The curiosity of Edwardian women’s fashion in open-air fish camp (useful against mosquitoes I suppose); the plank streets (for cars and horses) 400 miles from the nearest highway; even a Piggly-Wiggly store outside of the South.

Dermot Cole avoided the shop worn stash of Alaska photos. However, the next to last photo, page 197, is of the oil pipeline’s zigzagged engineering (to avoid temperature stresses) up the North Slope and over the Brooks Mountain Range. It’s a clever homage to the iconic Klondike gold rush photo of the future miners traipsing up the Chilkoot Pass.

I do have some quibbles with the book. There is an amazing variety of horses depicted but no photos of cows at Creamer’s Dairy in Fairbanks (I like the image of the wood stove chimney peeking out the milk truck to keep contents from freezing at 40 below).

More importantly, an outline map of Alaska is needed, with the places of photos identified.

The southwest of Alaska is mostly excluded. Considering that most folks in or outside Alaska believe everyone lives in an Eskimo igloo, it would also be helpful to include a map of languages/cultural regions in the state. Most readers will not be aware of the significance of the temporary, river going, hide boat depicted on page 44 built by the Athabascan Indian trapper to bring his skins to market. Compare with the more permanent skin boat built by Iñupiat Eskimo marine hunters on page 103. I already noted the Saami family.

The period of the first half of 1919 is missing although extremely important in the demography and history of non-urban Alaska. Upwards of 80% to 100% of people in some communities died during the pandemic of the “Spanish Flu”. The Jesse Lee Home (I ran across this recently published history) was one of several that cared for orphans left behind (those that survived long enough for help to reach them).

A suggested reading list would be nice, including Steven Langdon’s 1993. The Native People of Alaska. Anchorage, AK : Greatland Graphics. ISBN: 0936425172 9780936425177 OCLC: 27405205

A great companion volume would be John S. Whitehead’s 2004. Completing the Union: Alaska, Hawaii, and the Battle for Statehood. Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press. ISBN: 0826336361 9780826336361 082633637X 9780826336378, OCLC: 55665367

This book is not supposed to be a comprehensive pictorial history. Cole did an amazing job just to make a selection from all the possibilities and put together such an enjoyable book.


——————-
[Dermot Cole. 2008 Historic Photos of Alaska. Nashville: Turner Publishing Co.
# ISBN-10: 1596524243
# ISBN-13: 978-1596524248
# LoC 2007938665
Hardcover: 216 pages, Language: English, Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 10.1 x 1 inches, list price $39.95]


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »


O’Folks (off their rocker)

Old age isn't a disease.

Arctic sunset

© header image

Comments how-tos

For those new to blogs, check out this post *commenting on blogs* Recent comments, on the sidebar blogroll, often have additional or complementary information. Recent revisions of posts themselves may be found by using the search box for "revised". Tech support says spam (ads or worse) is hitting WordPress heavily so if you don't see your comment in 24 hours, send an E-mail and TS will check the spam trap.

RSS BHIC Bringing Health Info to the Community

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

RSS Nonagenarian news

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
September 2019
M T W T F S S
« May    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Haeremai Camai Bula Bepuwave Bienvenidos

  • 195,979 visitors
Advertisements